The NBA is worth the wait

first_imgPlease don’t go. I know USC “expects to return all its starters,” but in this world of one-and-done and million dollar rookie contracts, who could blame a 19-year-old for jumping ship?I am a wholehearted supporter of collegiate basketball players staying in school and not leaving early for the NBA. The NBA and the NCAA should be supporting this as well for many reasons.The quality of basketball at both the collegiate and NBA level would improve — that is something that benefits both organizations as well as the players. In the world of college athletics where perennial powerhouses Duke and Kentucky are pumping out lottery picks in every draft, there is something endearing about watching a team like Virginia or Oklahoma who have fostered a superstar over the course of time and are now reaping the benefits.The debate this year turns to LSU’s freshman Ben Simmons versus Oklahoma’s senior Buddy Hield, both near locks for the lottery. Perhaps Simmons has more potential to be a LeBron-esque superstar, but Hield is a senior and with three more years of experience, training and maturity, thus poses the safer pick for teams this summer. This debate is all without even knowing who will be injured when and not accounting for the development that each player will put in with their respective team throughout the offseason to improve, but the same debate happens at nearly every college once the season ends — should our guys stay or go?The answer is almost always: They should stay.There is the possibility for USC to build a sustainable success that goes beyond just one year with marginal postseason results and develop the talent and chemistry of this group to make more than one deep run into March — this doesn’t happen if players start leaving for the NBA.Sure none of our players are lottery picks, but that doesn’t mean someone wouldn’t draft them in one of the later rounds. However, that prospect is especially inadvisable for the player. Why risk not making a team and floating around in the D-League for a few years when you can stay at USC in the glorious sunshine of Los Angeles, go to class four or five days a week and play basketball with a group of guys who you share the Trojan ties with?The benefit that comes from staying in college and improving over the course of one or two more seasons can translate to millions of dollars and an elongated period of success for these prospects.The team also benefits from the players sticking around longer. The intangibles that are developed over the course of time for a team are something that make Oklahoma more appealing to the eye than Kentucky. The team chemistry is there. The dedication is there. The connection to the players is there.Last summer, the men’s basketball team traveled to Italy to play summer basketball. Not only is that a trip that those guys are going to remember for the rest of their lives, but the experiences both on and off the court that the team shares are what make a difference on the court in the long run. Baylor’s team imploded during their first round loss to Yale last weekend. Cameras showed teammates shoving each other and verbally fighting during a huddle. That does not translate to a winning culture on the court. Chemistry, friendship and camaraderie are what prevent these types of events from happening, and that can only happen when the whole team is all in over the course of their four-year stay at the University.So please don’t leave for the NBA if you are considering it. Give USC a little more time. I know you don’t owe anyone here anything, but imagine what you and the rest of your teammates could build together with the Trojan Family rooting you on.Another season is going to give you a whole new batch of stories and memories to share the rest of your life, not to mention the accolades that you and the team will be able to earn.This season was great. It was a breakout year for USC, but let’s keep building on that. I’ll see you all at the Galen Center in November.Hailey Tucker is a sophomore majoring in broadcast and digital journalism. She is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. Her column, “Tucker Talks,” runs every other Wednesday.last_img read more

Read More →

COLUMN: Successful hockey boycott is promising

first_imgOn Monday, the U.S. women’s hockey team reached the semifinals of the World Championships, knocking out Finland 5-3 to earn a top seeding. The win wasn’t necessarily a surprise for the Americans, who entered ranked No. 6 in the world against their unranked opponents. But its occurrence so close to Equal Pay Day was a moment of symbolic resonance that didn’t go unnoticed by the team or its fans.On the heels of a historic boycott at every level of the entire women’s hockey program, the victory was another symbolic step forward for a team that has long lived in the shadow of its male counterparts.The team announced its intention to boycott the IIHF Women’s World Championship in early March after failing to agree to an increase in player salaries with the governing body of USA Hockey. The decision was bold and risky, especially for a group of players who barely make a sustainable income off paltry salaries from their spots on national and NHWL teams.But it was a risk that the team felt was necessary. After 13 days, and only three nights before the first game of the world championship, USA Hockey released a joint statement detailing a new compromise. The deal might seem insufficient to some — salaries were raised from $1,000 a month to only $4,000 a month — but it was a far cry from the former stubbornness of USA Hockey in regard to equal treatment of its female players.The ultimate lesson of the players’ boycott was simple — equality of treatment comes quickly with solidarity in protest.The solidarity of the movement started with the women. Every single American women’s hockey player refused to suit up for the world championship. Starters, benchwarmers, third-stringers — not a single player broke rank. USA Hockey approached members of youth squads, reaching out all the way to the U16 athletes. Even the youngest stolidly refused to participate.This level of cooperation in a boycott was shocking. It was quickly followed by other staples of women’s athletics in America, with legends like Billie Jean King and Mia Hamm lending their support. But the most surprising and moving support of the movement came from the men’s side.Within a week, statements released by the NHL, NBA, NFL and MLB stood behind the women’s team. Mike Eruzione, the famous captain of the “Miracle on Ice” squad that won the 1980 Olympics, defended the players, demanding that USA Hockey provide all of its players with livable wages. Twenty U.S. senators signed a letter in support of the team. And in a final back-breaking movement, starting members of the men’s team threatened to join the women in their boycott of the world championships if changes weren’t made.It was a stunning show of support, one that is rare in the discussion of equitable wages between men’s and women’s teams. When the U.S. soccer team launched similar efforts last year, members of the men’s team openly voiced their distaste for the movement in interviews and social media posts. The reaction to the hockey team’s boycott was starkly different and displays the importance of cross-program and cross-sport support for any type of movement toward equality.Perhaps it’s a sad reflection of the fact that male voices often echo more loudly. Or maybe it just fits the hierarchical importance of men’s and women’s sports, with the men’s hockey team bringing in significantly higher revenue than the women’s team. But nonetheless, the support given by male athletes and organizations helped to drive the women’s movement home, benefiting a team that has struggled for decades.Without the national popularity that women’s sports such as soccer and gymnastics are afforded, women’s hockey is typically relegated to the back burner of American attention. Because of this, most Americans aren’t aware that players are forced to pick up part-time jobs to pay the bills and buy equipment, since the team doesn’t receive enough funding to buy sticks or gloves.But the attention the team earned in the last two weeks is an important move forward in creating equal opportunities for female hockey players. The boycott’s hashtag (#BeBoldForChange) became a rallying cry for feminists throughout the country, and its results will lay the groundwork for a continuation of support for women who want to play the game.And by standing with the women’s hockey team, each of these male organizations put itself on the right side of history. It’s a pattern that should serve as an example for the future. Female athletes have battled for the right to play for generations, and they will continue to move mountains in their fight for equality. But when athletes stand together, male and female, in the fight for progress, change will be made more swiftly and athletics as a whole will continue to grow and flourish.Julia Poe is a sophomore studying print and digital journalism. She is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. Her column, “Poe’s Perspective,” runs on Wednesdays.last_img read more

Read More →

Baseball to open the 2020 season at Dedeaux Friday

first_imgIn relief, the Trojans will have the luxury of bringing in the likes of sophomore righty Carson Lambert — who tied with Clarke for the team lead with 27 appearances — and junior lefty John Beller out of the pen.  The bullpen will hope to minimize the impact of losing closer Chris Clarke to the Major Leagues. Clarke led all USC relievers last season with 52.1 innings pitched and a stellar ERA of 1.03.  Gill will look to guide the Trojans above .500 on the season for the first time since 2015. USC won’t leave Southern California until 15 games into the season, when it will visit the Oregon Ducks  March 20. “I’m excited to finally play someone in a different uniform,” senior utility John Thomas said. “It’s been a lot of intrasquads against each other. But getting to play somebody else will be pretty cool.  Between those three and infielders Chase Bushor and Brandon Perez, USC lost a combined  21 of the team’s 32 home runs from last season.  On the mound, USC will be expecting increased contributions from starting juniors righty Kyle Hurt and lefty Isaac Esqueda, both of whom started more than 10 games for the Trojans last season.  USC hopes to build on last season’s 25-29-1 campaign. Without significant contributors like outfielder Matthew Acosta, catcher CJ Stubbs and outfielder Blake Sabol — all of whom departed following last season after being selected in the MLB Draft — the Trojans have a few holes to fill.  Head coach Jason Gill speaks to his team during practice Wednesday. (James Wolfe | Daily Trojan) Acosta was the only Trojan to finish the season with a batting average over .300 last season, posting a team-high mark of .319.  He also owned the team’s highest OPS at .899.  “There’s really no limit to this team,” junior outfielder Bart West said. “There’s so much talent. We’re under such a great coaching staff and we know how hard we’ve been working every day, so we’re really excited.” Along with Shockey, Gill and the Trojans are hoping for major contributions from expected starting third baseman junior Jamal O’Guinn, who had a strong average of .281 last season. O’Guinn demonstrated impressive plate discipline, drawing 27 walks — the top mark of any returning player for USC. He also had the most home runs of all returners with five.  Hurt is one of USC’s strikeout artists, leading the pitching staff in punchouts last season with 81 in just 74.1 innings. Still, Hurt will be looking to bounce back from a disappointing 5.69 ERA and reestablish himself as an early round pick in the MLB Draft.    The USC baseball team kicks off the 2020 season this weekend with a three-game home series against Western Michigan at Dedeaux Field. Shockey had the second highest batting average of the 2019 team, posting a mark of .295 in 14 at bats.center_img For the second straight year, Hurt is slated to start opening day on the hill. Last season, he tossed five innings on opening night against Nebraska, giving up 3 runs (2 earned) while racking up six strikeouts in a Trojan win. Gill, on the other hand, sees things differently.  Despite the encouraging returners on USC’s roster, many media outlets are skeptical of the Trojans’ chances to succeed in Gill’s first season at the helm. A recent Pac-12 coaches poll predicted USC to finish seventh in the conference. Hoping to fill this void at the plate is senior outfielder Brady Shockey, who Gill labeled as USC’s most complete hitter after fall workouts.  “A couple different publications —the two major ones I think — have us picked to finish in eighth in the Pac-12, and I think the coaches poll has us picked to finish seventh in the Pac-12,” Gill said. “The good news is that those don’t really matter, they’re preseason picks. I don’t think really anybody knows what’s in our camp.” Gill and USC will be looking to take advantage of a local preseason by getting into a rhythm before conference play opens up with a home series against Washington on March 13.  The rest of the opening weekend rotation will be filled by Esqueda and redshirt sophomore lefty Alex Cornwell.  So far, players are liking what they’ve seen from their new skipper and are confident about the season.  Before looking ahead, however, the Trojans will need to stay focused on the task at hand in Western Michigan, which went 18-31 last year and will also open its season this weekend.  Junior pitcher John Beller struck out a career-high 55 batters last season. (Ling Luo | Daily Trojan) Following a disappointing season in 2019, USC decided not to renew head coach Dan Hubbs’ contract after the season. In June, former athletic director Lynne Swann announced it had hired former longtime LMU head coach Jason Gill as its new head coach. In the time since, Gill has made it a point to change the culture around USC baseball, foregoing a sole emphasis on results in favor of first establishing a focus on relationships and development.  Beller will hope to build off a promising 2019 season. He tossed 49 innings with an ERA of 3.86 for the Trojans last year, switching between roles as a reliever and a starter throughout the season.  Hurt and the Trojans will open up their season and Gill’s tenure as head coach Friday at 6 p.m.last_img read more

Read More →

Syracuse loses in straight-sets to No. 3 Pitt after missed set point

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 11, 2019 at 11:53 pm Contact Alex: athamer@syr.edu | @alexhamer8 Heading into Friday’s match, Syracuse thought it had a chance. Despite coming off consecutive “frustrating” losses, the Orange had their best week of practice this season, assistant coach Derryk Williams said. The spirit and consistency Williams said SU showed in practice carried over into the first set against No. 3 Pittsburgh. Bolstered by the return of senior libero Aliah Bowllan, who had a game-high 16 digs, a fired-up SU squad flew around the court, constantly diving and digging balls out to keep rallies alive, often leading to Pitt attacking errors.Late in the first set, Syracuse found itself with a set point, up 24-23 thanks to a signature Marina Markova kill. She leaked out from the middle to the right side before spiking an Elena Karakasi pass over the outstretched arms of several Pitt players. On the next play, Karakasi had an opportunity to replicate the previous play, as Markova made an identical run, anticipating a Karakasi pass. Instead, Karakasi chose to pass left to Ella Saada, whose kill attempt was blocked, as Pitt went on to to take that point along with the next two, winning the set 26-24. “I wouldn’t consider it a missed opportunity, I would more consider it a learning point for us,” Bowllan said of losing the set point. “That’s one of the best sets we’ve played, probably this entire season, so I don’t think we can complain at all.” After escaping with the first set, Pittsburgh (16-1, 5-0 Atlantic Coast) never looked back, easily securing the next two sets as they defeated Syracuse (4-8, 1-4). The Panthers came in riding a four-game winning streak. Conversely, the loss marked the third straight at home for SU, and now with four conference losses, SU now has as many as last season. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the first set, the Orange didn’t out-hit Pitt, but recorded 16 kills despite posting a .140 hitting percentage. Yet in the next two sets combined, SU had just 18 kills and committed 17 attacking errors. Even during warm-ups, the gap in consistency between Pitt and Syracuse was evident, Williams said. “We want to figure out how we can get that first set through the entirety of our season, get two sets out of it, three sets, four sets,” Williams said. “They (Pitt) could probably do that for 10 sets straight.”In the second set, the strong energy and team defense SU had displayed in the first largely evaporated outside of Bowllan, who continued to lay out for every ball in her vicinity. Pitt seemed to take note of Bowllan’s play, and began directing its attacks away from the senior. Instead, the Panthers targeted Yuliia Yastrub and SU’s inexperienced middles, freshmen Abby Casiano and Markova. Markova, typically an outside hitter, was playing in the middle for only the second time in her SU career. On one play early on, Yastrub was caught flat-footed, and a Pitt kill ricocheted off her out-of-bounds. SU head coach Leonid Yelin promptly took her out on the next play, giving her a quick pep-talk before Yastrub joined her teammates on the bench. Yelin said he noticed Yastrub was being uncharacteristically hesitant, and wanted to bolster her confidence. “I know how she’s performing when she doesn’t have anything in the back of her mind, when she’s playing and not worrying about making mistakes,” Yelin said. “When she’s just going and focusing on how to win, don’t worry about nothing for a second because it will be a mistake.” After sitting out the remainder of the set, Yastrub returned for the third, but to little avail. Polina Shemanova, who paced the Orange with 15 kills and three aces, was emblematic of SU’s inconsistency after a strong first set. In that first set, Shemanova had six kills, with her thunderous cross-court kills stinging the hands of Pitt defenders, who were unable to parry Shemanova’s attacks back into play. By the third set, the Panthers adjusted, getting their front row into positions that thwarted Shemanova and SU’s attacks. At one point in the third set, Saada had three straight attacking errors, with Pitt blockers getting their hands up quickly, forcing Saada to fire her attacks way out of bounds down SU’s left side. Later in the set, Pitt’s front row showed up again, this time with a spike that came down so fast at Karakasi she could only react by parrying the ball off Markova’s face, allowing Pitt to take the point and eventually, the set 25-17. While the first set proved SU could hang with one of the best teams in the country, the next two revealed the gap the Orange need to close in order to secure a second consecutive NCAA tournament berth.“There’s a reason why they (Pitt) are No. 3 now, they can consistently play on this level, and I hope we are in the process to start moving in this direction,” Yelin said. “We have to just keep going and be patient so it’s not just one (good) set, but two and hopefully three.” Commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Syracuse blasts Division III SUNY Morrisville, 11-0, in tune-up game

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ As starting lineups were announced during Tuesday afternoon’s Syracuse men’s soccer game, players weren’t standing where they usually do. Instead of traditionally lining up in the midfield circle, often with kids from local youth teams at their sides, the Orange and Mustangs stood under the overhangs of their benches. There was no national anthem, the game started five minutes ahead of schedule and there were less than a dozen fans in attendance. Nothing was usual about the Orange’s Tuesday match against SUNY Morrisville.As heavy rainfall soaked SU Soccer Stadium turning grass into mud, Syracuse (6-4-4, 1-3-2 Atlantic Coast) poured in 11 goals in an 11-0 win over Division III SUNY Morrisville (2-11-2, 1-6-1 NEAC). After five goals in the first half and six more in the second, Syracuse was barely celebrating scores by game’s end. Even when Ryan Raposo and Massimo Ferrin netted hat tricks, SU took the ball back to the center circle to restart play as its goal song, “Hot” by Young Thug, played on repeat the entire afternoon. “It’s nice to play against a live opponent,” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. “We got out of it exactly what we were looking for. We’re very appreciative for them coming down.”A game that originally wasn’t on the schedule, Syracuse tuned itself up ahead of the final home stretch of the season that features two ACC opponents: North Carolina State and Boston College. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhen Syracuse’s game against Albany on Oct. 1 was canceled due to lightning, the Orange had a hole in their schedule, room for one more regular-season game of their 16 total. They could have opted to not fill the spot, instead hosting a practice on Tuesday that would have been an eight-on-eight or nine-on-nine scrimmage, McIntyre said. “It’s a difficult time to lose a game,” McIntyre said. “Everyone is playing games and has got conference games, and it was nice to have a local team with ties to the region.”McIntyre wanted to get the Orange a game, but couldn’t find another Division I school with an opening. So he called Morrisville, a Division III school about 30 miles from the SU campus. It took less than five minutes, at 3:59 p.m., one minute before the game was scheduled to begin, for Luther Archimede to beat Morrisville keeper Tyler Card.Less than four days after Syracuse’s defense was torn open in a 7-4 loss to ACC powerhouse Clemson, the Orange were able to showcase their attacking talent, albeit against a Division III team that had lost its last five games before Tuesday.“The way you respect your opponent is to give them your best shot, and we did that,” McIntyre said. “It’s a lot better to do work with a soccer ball. From a training perspective, it was very good today, it’s making sure you’re respecting your opponent.”The Orange stifled Morrsiville’s non-existent attack, holding the Mustangs to just one shot, a long-range prayer from 30 yards that sailed well over the head of Orange backup goalkeeper Jake Leahy. Leahy made his third start of the season, but first since Christian Miesch won the starting goalkeeper job back in September.The Mustangs completed just seven passes inside the Orange’s half on Tuesday. Syracuse’s superior talent passed around, through and over the Mustangs repeatedly. Simon Triantafillou came sliding in for a back-post finish, missed just wide and kept sliding about five more yards on the soaked grass. Both areas in front of each goal turned from its usual green to brown mud. “The weather certainly made it interesting,” McIntyre said. “But still a good afternoon.”The Orange’s dominant lead provided opportunities for two SU players to get their first game action of the season. Both Mickey Watson, a transfer from Loyola, and Nikolas Steiner, a redshirt sophomore from Baltimore, saw their first game action of the season.Steiner played as a right wing-back and tallied his first career point with an assist on the Orange’s fifth goal five minutes before halftime. The Mustangs offered little resistance once Raposo ran in behind the defense and finished with a ground shot to the far-post. “We could have taken today off or practiced, but to get out on the pitch and get an actual game in,” Watson said. “I think especially coming off the Clemson game, we needed this one.”SU poured in shot-after-shot, 32 in total, as SU’s back three spent the entire afternoon trotting around inside Morrisville’s half. Occasionally they’d play a few passes to one another, but rarely were they challenged.  Once the Orange got their second, the third, fourth and fifth scores came in quick succession. Ferrin converted a penalty after he was taken down in the box, Archimede cleaned up a penalty area scrum with a far post tap-in and Severin Soerlie nabbed his second goal just before halftime.The second half was merely a formality, as the minutes ticked down off the soaked scoreboard, occasionally adding one tally for the Orange. Each player sauntered back into the locker room, as if a practice had just ended. Typically, the Orange huddle up post-match on the field for a team talk. But Tuesday wasn’t a typical game.  Comments Published on October 22, 2019 at 7:30 pm Contact Anthony: amdabbun@syr.edulast_img read more

Read More →

Evening racing at Dundalk.

first_imgThere are 3 Tipperary runners in action.Charlie Swan will saddle up 12/1 outsider Moving On Up, and he will run alongside 10/1 shot Along the Shore, watched over by Aidan O Brien.Tipp involvement is completed by the Andrew Slattery trained Merry Mast can be backed at 8/1 in the Dundalk Stadium on Facebook Handicap at 8 o’clock.last_img

Read More →

Lacey praises Tipp’s strength ahead of Dublin game

first_imgThe Premier County will take on Dublin in O’Connor Park in Tullamore and will be looking to reach their first ever Under 21 All-Ireland final. Manager Tommy Twomey and his management team have named an unchanged starting 15 for the match-up. And Tipp FM’s football analyst Brian Lacey says while Dublin are strong, Tipp have their own strengths. Throw-in on Saturday is at 4pm and Tipp FM will have full live coverage in association with John Kennedy Motors, Main Toyota Dealer, Clonmel.last_img

Read More →

Tipp unchanged for Kingdom visit.

first_imgThe Gooch missed all of last year’s campaign through injury but returns at centre forward with Michael Geaney and Johnny Buckley.Footballer of the year James O’Donoughue is on the bench alongside Stephen O’Brien, Aidan O’Mahony, Tommy Walsh and Paul Galvin.Throw-in is at 3.30 in Semple Stadium on Sunday and Tipp FM will have full live coverage of the game in association with O’Donovan Marquees, Birdhill.The Tipperary team is as follows –  Evan Comerford (Kilsheelan Kilcash), Paddy Codd Capt. (Killenaule), Ciarán McDonald (Aherlow), Robbie Kiely (Carbery Rangers), Seamus Kennedy (Clonmel Commercials), Peter Acheson (Moyle Rovers), Alan Campbell (Moyle Rovers), Steven O’Brien (Ballina), George Hannigan (Shannon Rovers), Colin O’Riordan (JK Brackens), Philip Austin (Borrisokane), Ger Mulhaire (Arravale Rovers), Conor Sweeney (Ballyporeen), Michael Quinlivan (Clonmel Commercials), Brian Fox (Éire Óg Annacarty). Following on from their very impressive quarter-final display against Waterford, Tipperary Senior Football manager Peter Creedon has elected to run with the same 15 against Kerry on Sunday.Under 21 Player of the Year Colin O’Riordan has been passed fit to start after his recent injury scare.Meanwhile Colm Cooper is back in the Kerry starting 15.last_img read more

Read More →

Win for Chelsea but disastrous night for Arsenal

first_imgIt could also save Jose Mourinho’s job.A brilliantly flighted 83rd minute free-kick from Willian was the moment of magic that Chelsea needed as they bagged a vital win that should ease some of the pressure on their underfire manager.In contrast to their London rivals, Arsenal had a disastrous night in Germany. The Gunners slumped to a 5-1 defeat to Bayern Munich tonight in the Allianz Arena, with Thomas Mueller scoring twice.The defeat means that Arsenal must now win their final two matches in Group F, including a two-goal winning margin over Greek side Olympiakos if they’re to reach the knock-out stages.last_img

Read More →

Callanan’s starring role this summer is rewarded with an All Star

first_imgFormer multiple All Star award winner Eoin Kelly says there’s a case to be made for some other Tipperary players to be included in the All Star list such as Cathal Barrett and Paidi Maher.The Mullinahone clubman says Tipp expected to get to the All Ireland final this year, and that Thurles Sarsfields Paidi Maher was also in the running for an All Star award after his performances at half back. The All Ireland winning captain also said that the All Stars were along expected lines and were a fair reflection of this year’s hurling matches.last_img

Read More →