Badgers’ youth exposed by Fighting Sioux

first_imgThe Wisconsin men’s hockey team wasn’t expected to lead to the nation in scoring and get off to a hot 6-2-2 start this season.They were expected to perform like an inexperienced group and work through some tough times early on.Those growing pains finally came this weekend as North Dakota swept the Badgers at the Kohl Center.“We talked to the kids after the game. Our record is 3-3-2 in the league, 6-4-2 overall. If somebody said that that would be our record now, we would have said ‘we’d take that with this young group’,” head coach Mike Eaves said after the game Saturday. “We’re going through some growing pains right now, so this is what I thought we would see even earlier, so I’m not truly surprised by this.”Simply put, Wisconsin’s youth was exposed throughout the weekend. Against an experienced, deep UND squad, the Badgers were frustrated offensively and their lack of maturity surfaced.The main issue in Friday’s 1-0 loss was UW’s inability to stick with their game plan in the offensive zone. The Badgers have been successful creating scoring chances this season due to their strong forecheck and ability to work the puck down low.But with only nine shots through two periods, UW strayed from that plan. Players seemingly tried to work through the UND defense themselves and it cost them.“You could definitely see that the guys were getting frustrated out there and trying to do things on their own,” captain Sean Dolan said.“We started to go outside the box in terms of how we wanted to play as a team, and as a result you end up getting individualistic and you’re not going to find the answers there,” Eaves said. “And that’s not to be unexpected with a young team. Those are lessons that an older team has under its belt, and it’s one we hope we can apply.”The Fighting Sioux continued to play their game and a 12-shot third period eventually led to the game-winning goal. UW’s “individualistic” offense led to just 16 total shots.Game two provided another learning experience after another losing effort.Eaves hinted that the Badgers’ confidence took a hit after the humbling loss Friday as once again, his team mustered just 16 shots.“Because of the way we lost last night, we lost some confidence. It seemed to me that we were on our heels rather than on our toes,” Eaves said.North Dakota dictated the flow of the game from the start. The Fighting Sioux were the first ones to loose pucks, they were stronger along the boards and as a result, they dominated offensively tallying 43 shots and earning a 4-2 victory.Junior defenseman and assistant captain Jake Gardiner believed the effort was there Saturday, but his team didn’t show the fight, or the composure necessary to take down a team like UND.“It’s not so much the effort, it’s the heart I think,” Gardiner said. “Coach Eaves always thrives on that, and we didn’t give it. We didn’t do the little things right in the first two periods, and that caused the loss to hurt I think.“Little details in the third – not so smart penalties – we can’t do that.”Those senseless penalties became a major storyline at the end of Saturday’s game. The Badgers took three penalties in the third period, but Craig Smith’s delay of game minor did the most damage.After UND took a 2-1 lead just over six minutes into the final period, Smith knocked the net off its moorings with UW attempting to mount a comeback two minutes later. UND defenseman Ben Blood was holding the puck behind his own net and Smith, one of UW’s assistant captains, inexplicably shoved the net into Blood.North Dakota capitalized by extending the lead seconds later.After going unbeaten in their first four WCHA games, this sweep at the hands of UND sent a message to the Badgers.It’s a long, demanding season and UW got its first taste of how difficult this conference can be.“It’s a big-time reality check for such a young team. We haven’t really gone through this yet this year,” said sophomore defenseman Justin Schultz. “I’m more disappointed than surprised. Coming out here, we were on a hot streak. We wanted to continue that against North Dakota, but we’ll go back to work this week and get ready for Duluth.”last_img read more

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Kicks for Kids starts off new semester

first_imgOn Sunday, student organization Kicks for Kids, a soccer league for special needs children, held its first game of the new season at McCarthy Quad.Kicks for Kids aims to promote  a healthy lifestyle through physical activity. The organization was founded by its current president, Zade Shakir, a senior majoring in biology and international relations.Shakir started the program last fall after being inspired by his involvement with Spirits in Action, USC’s version of the Special Olympics. After speaking with a parent, Shakir realized there was a lack of resources available for kids with developmental disabilities, particularly in organized sports.Growing up, Shakir said, soccer was a major part of his life, with some of his best memories taking place out on the field. He felt a responsibility to give special needs children the same opportunity.“I wanted to create an avenue where kids could come have fun, get fit, bring their friends and families to have similar memories,” Shakir said.Additionally, the club is aimed at combating the correlation between obesity and children with developmental disabilities. The weekly Kicks for Kids soccer games provide kids with the chance to run around, make friends and form relationships with the student volunteers.Each player is paired with a volunteer that he or she generally stays with each week. Adwight Risbud, a sophomore majoring in religious studies and human biology, described his time with one of the students.“During my first experience with Kicks for Kids, I was paired up with a buddy, Aidan, who is a 6-year-old with Down’s syndrome, and I was with him for the next five weeks,” Risbud said. “We were able to form a great relationship.”Risbud is also in charge of player recruitment, which entails reaching out to schools and families to spread the word about Kicks for Kids. Schools in the surrounding area with special needs programs have been incredibly receptive to the organization, and the parents have an advisory board to give their ideas and input on the weekly activities.The parents also helped put the club in contact with special guests such as celebrity trainer Dion Jackson and the Los Angeles Laker Girls.Jackson, who has worked with celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez, Carrie Fisher and Dustin Hoffman, gave participants and parents healthy lifestyle tips. He also showed the participants exercises and stretches they can incorporate before they play in their soccer games.The Laker Girls also provided encouragement and inspiration to the children by taking the time to talk and play with them.The success of Kicks for Kids is not only derived from the parents and celebrity guests, but also from other student organizations. Groups such as the Helenes, Spirit Leaders and the pre-health honor society donate their time each week. Shakir made a big effort to talk to pre-health and occupational therapy students to give them the chance to work with kids who could be similar to their future patients.More than 50 volunteers came together to make this year’s season kick off another success.                 Rima Al-Rabadi, a junior majoring in global health and a member of the  Helenes, noted the program was equally beneficial to the students and kids.“For the students, it is rewarding to see how just spending the morning with a kid can make their day,” Al-Rabadi said. “For the kids, they have an incredible opportunity to create relationships and interact with other kids like them. Overall, it is a unifying and rewarding experience.”last_img read more

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Standing guard: USC prepares for crisis

first_imgSarah Kim | Daily TrojanIn the past 50 years, universities and schools have become a site for shootings. From tragedies like the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre to the fatal officer shooting at Texas Tech University  on Oct. 9, the possibility of violence hangs in the air at American universities. Preparedness during crises is emphasized among law enforcement and public safety officials, and at USC, this is no exception. When false reports of an active shooter at Fertitta Hall came in on Monday, Oct. 2, USC’s preparation was put to the test. The University’s response reaffirmed these preparation methods, said Steve Goldfarb, fire safety emergency planning specialist. Departments like Goldfarb’s, along with the Office of Campus Wellness and Crisis Intervention team, work to ensure the campus and its students, faculty and staff are prepared for any type of crisis. While the event at Fertitta Hall disrupted the campus, USC’s reaction pointed out both strengths and flaws in the systems Goldfarb and others spent months developing.“One of the things that we should all feel really good about in this case is that within three minutes of getting the call that there was an active shooter, Los Angeles Police Department and Special Weapons and Tactics were in the building,” Goldfarb said. While addressing the issue is a priority, communication remains important. TrojansAlert is a system that sends out updates from DPS during a crisis via text message and email. During an emergency, TrojanAlerts will be DPS’ primary point of communication with the community, said DPS Assistant Chief of Public Safety David Carlisle. “Every student, every faculty member should be enrolled, but we know that may not be the case, people change their phone numbers, things happen,” Carlisle said. “That’s when we would expect people to exchange information in the classroom. So that’s the primary way of getting the message out.”As the incident unfolded, students received five different text messages from TrojansAlert, starting with an initial report to avoid the area and shelter, and ending with the final alert that Fertitta Hall had reopened.A TrojansAlert text was sent at 12:29 p.m., informing students that the police were searching the hall after unconfirmed reports of shots fired. The next text was sent at 1:04 p.m., this time stating there was no evidence of gunfire and that campus activities could resume. In the 35 minutes TrojansAlert was silent, students were not. Katlyn Lee | Daily TrojanThe University recognized that this silence was becoming problematic as rumors spread, said Vice Provost for Campus Wellness and Crisis Intervention Varun Soni. “I will say that in this particular case there was a lot of misinformation online, a lot of false reporting that exacerbated the anxiety on campus,” Soni said. “So, it’s really important that TrojansAlert becomes the legitimate source of information that’s verified.” Carlisle noted that DPS’ primary function is to keep the University campus safe.  In a developing situation, this may not always correlate to the instant communication that students desire. “We are doing our best to verify the information, with the most accurate information, as quickly as practical in an emergency situation,” Carlisle said. “And sometimes that takes a little time to verify what we’re hearing.” Another issue presented with TrojansAlert lies in its platform — primarily, cell phones. In classes where use of electronic devices is prohibited, students or faculty may not be able to see a TrojansAlert, potentially delaying or preventing them from quickly responding to an emergency. According to Carlisle, these considerations are currently being discussed. Possible improvements include emergency message board systems or loudspeakers to ensure the message is received on multiple platforms.However, even before the events at Fertitta, USC had placed significance on emergency preparedness. Soni leads the University’s crisis intervention office, which was developed in the 2017-18 school year. The office has three goals: create a culture of wellbeing to prevent threats by developing, help those facing personal crises and develop a system to assess crises. This includes hiring the University’s first-ever Chief of Threat Assessment, Patrick Prince. “We want to do a better job making sure our entire community feels prepared in an active shooter scenario,” Soni said. “These are always traumatic instances and that makes it more important to empower people to make sure they feel like they know what to do in the certain cases.” Goldfarb encourages USC students, faculty and staff to visit USC’s safety website. He recommends all watch a new nine-minute emergency procedures video. While watching the video is not a widespread requirement, Goldfarb expects it to become a part of new student orientation, hopefully beginning in Spring 2018. Whether it’s an earthquake or an active shooter incident, Goldfarb encourages all to take initiative before the crisis occurs, like knowing multiple exit routes from their classes and residential hall. “It’s [about] taking personal responsibility to make sure you understand the emergency procedures,” Goldfarb said. Goldfarb, Soni and Carlisle know that any incident, even a false alarm, can be traumatic. However, instead of creating fear, they hope the incident at Fertitta Hall provides the USC community with motivation to prepare. “We want all students, faculty and staff to make sure they take our emergency preparedness, not just our active shooter training, but all of our preparedness very seriously,” Carlisle said. “It could happen here.”last_img read more

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Stock Watch: Who impressed and who regressed in Syracuse football’s win against Central Michigan

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 17, 2017 at 7:39 pm Contact: jtbloss@syr.edu | @jtbloss Syracuse picked up its second win of the season Saturday with a 41-17 win over Central Michigan. SU (2-1) held the Chippewas (2-1) scoreless in the second half and had its best performance on the ground in the Dino Babers era, finishing the game with exactly 300 rushing yards.Here’s an assessment of some of SU’s notable performances.Stock upSean RileyRiley did it all for Syracuse on Saturday. He returned two kicks for a total of 98 yards, forcing CMU to kick away from him. He added four receptions for 82 yards and rushed four times for 47 yards. Add 20 yards on punt returns and that’s 247 all-purpose yards for the sophomore. With senior receiver Ervin Philips’ status unknown at this point, electric outings like this from Riley will be a big pick-me-up for the SU offense.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Andy Mendes | Digital Design Editor Moe NealThe sophomore broke loose for a 71-yard gain in the third quarter, marking a breakthrough for SU’s run game that struggled mightily through two games. It was Neal’s only major contribution, as he only received five carries, but it reinforced the notion that he is probably the team’s best big-play threat. With primary running back Dontae Strickland struggling to get in a rhythm, keep an eye on how many touches Neal gets moving forward.Evan FosterFoster took a bad angle when attempting to make a tackle on the sideline in the first quarter and his error allowed CMU’s Cameron Cole to run free for a 56-yard touchdown. But less than five minutes later, Foster made up for it by grabbing a tipped ball and taking it 24 yards to the house for a pick-six. Foster, along with several of his teammate in the secondary, deserves a good deal of credit for keeping the Chippewas scoreless for the final 37-plus minutes of the game. The unit has responded well to its mistakes, an encouraging note for a group that had some question marks entering the season.Sterling HofrichterHofrichter’s performance was key in giving CMU unfavorable field-positioning. SU’s punter averaged a career high 51 yards on seven punts and did not allow a single Central Michigan return. He booted a 64-yarder and pinned two CMU drives within the Chippewas’ 10-yard line and would’ve had a third if his coverage team didn’t accidentally step on the goal line when trying to down what was pretty much a perfect punt from Hofrichter at the one-yard line.Wasim Ahmad | Staff PhotographerStock DownCole MurphyMurphy’s struggles away from the Carrier Dome have been well documented, but it’s hard to justify some of his mistakes made at home. He sent two kickoffs out of bounds, giving CMU solid field position at the 35-yard line without having to earn it. He almost missed an extra point, but it bounced off the right post and in. Murphy did convert on each of his two field goals, one from 41 yards out and the other from 25.Dontae StricklandThe Orange’s featured back had two touchdowns over the weekend, one involving an open-field cut that showed Strickland’s potential when working in space. Strickland has struggled to consistently find that needed space through three games. He still has yet to rush for more than 10 yards on a single play and averaged just three yards on 15 carries Saturday. Strickland will continue to get his touches, but with weapons like Neal and Riley impressing, he’ll need to start making bigger plays to avoid losing touches. Commentslast_img read more

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Rob Gronkowski seen regularly at Gillette Stadium since Super Bowl, report says

first_imgDon’t rule Rob Gronkowski out for the 2019 season just yet.According to ESPN’s Mike Reiss, the Patriots tight end has been seen “multiple times” at Gillette Stadium since New England defeated the Rams in Super Bowl 53 earlier this month. Colin Kaepernick’s attorney predicts Patriots or Panthers will sign QB Gronkowski, 29, has been the subject of trade and retirement talks in recent seasons due in large part to injuries and a rumored desire to pursue a career in Hollywood. He admitted he has considered calling it a career, but was unwilling to discuss his future after the Patriots won their sixth Lombardi Trophy.center_img The report noted that while Gronkowski could just be visiting the facility to receive treatment on his thigh, he may also be reflecting on finishing the season in a good place “both team-wise and personally.”Gronkowski’s presence at Gillette Stadium doesn’t say much about his intentions to continue playing or not, but it does leave the door open, considering he’s on good terms with the organization after rumors of turmoil last year. Related Newslast_img read more

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Wellington Police Notes: Monday, Oct. 5, 2015

first_imgWellington Police notes: Monday, October 5, 2015•7:42 a.m. Officers investigated a theft and criminal damage to property in the 2000 block B, Wellington.•9:41 a.m. Officers investigated a theft and criminal damage to property in the 2000 block N. Madison, Wellington.•9:47 a.m. Officers investigated criminal use of a financial card and theft in the 200 block W. Harvey, Wellington by known suspect.•2 p.m. Non-Injury, hit and run accident that occurred on October 4, Wellington in the 800 block Settlers Circle, Wellington involving an unknown vehicle and a parked and unoccupied vehicle owned by Ashley M.Farley, Wellington.•2:03 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a canopy swing in the 1000 block S. Jefferson, Wellington.•4:58 p.m. William S. Kirk, 45, Wellington was arrested and confined on a Sumner County Warrant for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia confined•11:20 p.m. Lance L. Stephens, 21, Mulvane, was issued a notice to appear for disobeyed stop sign.last_img read more

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Divisional Round DraftKings Picks: Daily fantasy football lineup advice for Saturday’s NFL Playoff DFS tournaments

first_imgThere are only so many potential picks when you’re playing a two-game NFL DFS slate. This Saturday’s divisional round playoff matchups between the Titans and Ravens and Vikings and 49ers feature plenty of top-shelf talent, but balancing budget, matchups, and differentiation isn’t easy in DraftKings contests — especially if you’re going to fade Lamar Jackson. Yes, we’re going that route with our GPP lineup. It’s risky, to say the least, but Jackson had four one-TD games this year, so it’s not as if he scores 40 points every week (just most weeks). Either way, we’re taking our shot with two of Baltimore’s other key contributors, plus a big 49ers stack that needs to hit. We’re also covering our bases with some correlating Vikings and a Titan. With big spreads across the board this round, we’re hoping game script is a little more predictable than last week.  MORE DIVISIONAL ROUND DFS: FanDuel | DraftKings | YahooSaturday NFL Playoff DraftKings Picks: Divisional Round DFS tournament lineupQB Jimmy Garoppolo, 49ers vs. Vikings ($5,600). Fading Jackson for any of the other three QBs on Saturday’s slate is a risk, but if Jackson has a subpar game, you’ll put yourself in great position to cash. Obviously, that’s a big “if”, but with just four teams in action, you’re going to have to take a few shots. Garoppolo is coming off an efficient game in Week 17 in Seattle (18-for-22, 285 yards), but he failed to account for a touchdown. We expect that to change this week against a Vikings defense that tied for the third-most pass completions allowed this year. San Francisco will try to establish the run, but the Vikings’ stout front can force them to the air, where Garoppolo has an advantage. RB Mark Ingram, Ravens vs. Titans ($6,700). Ingram’s calf injury could cause others to fade him, but as long as he plays, he should produce. He averaged 14.5 touches per game in his 14 full contests, and at 5.0 yards per carry, he’ll provide a solid floor with yards. And we know what kind of TD upside he has, scoring 15 times in as many games, including five receiving touchdowns over his final five contests. Other than Jackson, he’s the Ravens’ go-to guy when they get inside the 10. RB Dalvin Cook, Vikings @ 49ers ($8,000). If you’re choosing between Cook and Derrick Henry (something we didn’t do with our full weekend DK lineup where we took both), the deciding factor should be which back can be more effective if his team trails by two possessions in the second half. We know both will get fed early, but Cook is much more likely to be used in the passing game if Minnesota finds itself playing from behind. Henry is a beast, but Cook has more upside in DK’s full-point PPR format. MORE SATURDAY DFS: FanDuel lineupWR Deebo Samuel, 49ers vs. Vikings ($5,200). We put Samuel on two of our full weekend teams, and the reasoning is pretty simple: He gets a decent amount of targets (5.6 per game), plus one or two carries, and is priced rather modestly considering his big-play upside. Minnesota gave up a lot of receptions to WRs during the regular season (second most), and starting DB Mackensie Alexander (knee) won’t play this week. If we’re going to take a chance on Jimmy G, we need a couple of his receivers. Samuel is as good of a bet as any. WR Stefon Diggs, Vikings @  49ers ($5,600). Whenever Diggs whines, he usually gets the ball a lot the following week. Perhaps that won’t be the case in the playoffs, but we’re actually encouraged by his disappointing, tantrum-filled wild card performance. In GPPs, Diggs’ big-play potential at a cheaper price makes him more appealing than Adam Thielen, and the fact the Vikings seem to like trying trick plays where Diggs throws the ball is an added bonus. WR Tajae Sharpe, Titans @ Ravens ($3,500). The Ravens struggle a bit against slot receivers (Cole Beasley and Jamison Crowder combined for 119 yards and three TDs against them in Weeks 14 and 15), and Sharpe could play that role with Adam Humphries (ankle) hurt. Even if he isn’t in the slot much, we expect the Titans to be trailing and throwing more in the second half, opening things up for some cheap points from at least one of their pass-catchers. We might as well take a shot on Sharpe, who had a two-TD game in Week 16. SUNDAY DFS LINEUPS: FanDuel | DraftKings TE George Kittle, 49ers vs. Vikings ($6,200). If you’re taking Jimmy G, you gotta take Kittle. The matchup looks rough, as Minnesota allowed the second-fewest fantasy points to TEs during the regular season, but a fluky low amount of TDs (1) inflated its prowess against the position. The Vikings actually gave up the eighth-most TE receptions, and if Kittle racks up catches, then yards and maybe a touchdown are sure to follow. FLEX Mark Andrews, Ravens vs. Titans ($5,600). With Ingram and Andrews, we have the two most likely Ravens to score (other than Jackson, of course). Tennessee allowed the fourth-most fantasy points to TEs during the regular season, so we’ll go all-in on this two-TE set that most DFS owners will shy away from. D/ST Baltimore Ravens vs. Titans ($3,600). There aren’t any obvious matchups to pick on here, so we’ll opt for a home defense with a ton of big-play potential. Baltimore has a low floor because Tennessee could simply grind out long drives on the ground, which offers limited opportunities for sacks and INTs, but if the Ravens jump out to a lead like we expect, it could take Tennessee out of its comfort zone and force it to pass more.last_img read more

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As long as LeBron James keeps hitting this magic number, the Lakers will win forever

first_imgMORE: In LeBron vs. Zion Round 1, King James reigns supremeJames’ latest scoring explosion did continue what has been an unexpected statistical trend, however. When James hits 30 points, the Lakers do not lose — a major improvement from 2018-19, when the Lakers were just 7-8 in games in which James reached that threshold.LeBron James scoring outputRecord30-plus points18-020-30 points20-6Fewer than 20 points5-5Overall43-11**Los Angeles is 1-1 when James is inactive.James’ individual point totals in those 18 games: 30 (twice), 31 (five times), 32 (five times), 33 (twice), 35, 36, 39 and 40, for an average of 32.8 points per game. He has averaged 9.7 assists and 7.8 rebounds for good measure, and shot better than 47 percent from the field in all of those contests.LeBron season-high 40 ‼️@KingJames’ 40 PTS, 8 REB, 6 AST leads the @Lakers to their 6th straight W. #LakeShow pic.twitter.com/Nt1gdZdP23— NBA (@NBA) February 26, 2020The Lakers have racked up wins against basement-dwellers over that stretch, but they also defeated the Jazz, Nuggets and Rockets, three of the top five teams in the current Western Conference standings. On the other side of the spectrum, Los Angeles has been vulnerable during James’ off nights. The Lakers are 5-5 when he is held to fewer than 20 points. He has still contributed to the offense by averaging 12.9 assists over those 10 games, but his efficiency drops dramatically, especially from 3-point range (12 of 47 shooting, or 25.5 percent).So what does this tell us? In order to win the NBA championship, Lakers coach Frank Vogel simply needs to employ a new strategy.Tell LeBron to score 30 points in every game. Boom, done. We’ve found the secret to the Lakers’ success, and it ​unsurprisingly directs back to LeBron James.James scored a season-high 40 points in Tuesday’s 118-109 victory over the Pelicans, outshining fellow All-Stars Anthony Davis and Brandon Ingram as well as exciting rookie Zion Williamson. James establishing himself as the best player on the floor in a marquee game is not an uncommon occurrence: This is Year 17 of the LeBron experience, after all.last_img read more

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Cerro Gordo health officials warn of continued COVID-19 spread, numbers up in 18-40 year olds

first_imgIf you are 65 or older, have underlying pre-existing medical conditions, or are pregnant, limit your interactions with others and avoid public settingsStay home if you aren’t feeling wellWear a cloth facial covering in all public settingsFrequently wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 secondsCough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbowAvoid touching your mouth, nose and eyesLimit your face-to-face interactionsAvoid large gatherings MASON CITY — Cerro Gordo County health officials warn of the increased number of COVID-19 cases in the county. 44 of the county’s 70 total cases have been identified in the month of June. There’s been a significant spike in illness within the young adult population ages 18-40, with over half of the cases in June being in that age range.The Cerro Gordo County Department of Public Health says there’s no specific event or location connecting the cases, indicating increased community spread, and that COVID-19 is still prevalent in the community and that people should continue with prevention efforts to help slow the spread of the virus. Among the department’s recommendations: CG Public Health continues to contact all lab-confirmed cases as well as close contacts who are identified. Public Health Director Brian Hanft says they make the calls and many times the person on the other end is shocked by their diagnosis or exposure. He says decreasing the spread of COVID-19 requires community commitment to social distancing and prevention practices.last_img read more

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