ROTC seniors prepare for service

first_imgThe men and women in Notre Dame’s ROTC battalions will serve more than clients and bosses in their future work. They will be serving their country. Notre Dame has three ROTC battalions: Army, Navy and Air Force. Each senior is commissioned upon graduation and enters their branch of the military as an officer.   Mary Coyne, one of the 32 seniors graduating from the Naval ROTC battalion, said she are excited to begin training for a specialized career path in the U.S. Navy. Coyne said she is one of the first girls ever chosen to enter the submarine branch and will begin training in October. “I think this is one of the first years that they have ever looked at ROTC girls [for submarines],” Coyne said. “I know it’s going to be really hard, and I know that there are going to be people who don’t think I should even be there because I’m a girl … but the only thing that I can do is to prove that I can do my job, respectfully.” Senior Kevin Brainard, a graduate of the Naval ROTC program, said he is preparing for a future as a pilot in the Marine Corps. “I’m a specialized case, because I’m going in with a flight contract,” Brainard said. “I know I’m going to fly something, but I don’t know exactly what yet.” Brainard, a psychology major, will move to Quantico, Va., immediately after graduation to enter The Basic School. The Basic School provides newly commissioned officers with the professional knowledge and leadership education to prepare them for duty as a company grade officer, according to the school’s website. “In my case, I’m going to be a pilot in the Marine Corps, but should I for whatever reason find myself commanding a ground unit, I’m going to be able to do that as well, thanks to training at [The Basic School],” Brainard said. Seniors Jane McNaughton and Trevor Waliszewski are two of the 17 cadets in Notre Dame’s Army ROTC battalion who will be commissioned as officers after graduation.   McNaughton, who will graduate from Saint Mary’s with a degree in social work, said she eventually will enter the military intelligence branch of the Navy, but will first serve a three-year stint with the Navy’s Chemical Corps. “Military intelligence loans me out, you could say, to the Chemical Corps,” she said. “There, I will be responsible for chemical weapons, nuclear and biological weapons … For the first three years, I will be working in that branch, and then I will go back to being a military intelligence officer.”  The chance to have variety in her assigned duties makes her chosen branch all the more attractive, McNaughton said. “With the Chemical Corps, there is so much variety in what officers can be assigned to do,” she said. “I can do a whole variety of things: a battalion staff position, which means working with planning and training operations for a few companies, or a chemical company position, which would mean that I would be assigned to my own platoon.” Waliszewski said he is pursuing a career as a Judge Advocacy General (JAG) lawyer.    “I’m on a pretty unique track,” Waliszewski said. “I’m getting an educational delay and then heading off to law school, where I will commission as a JAG lawyer.” Waliszewski said he will confront a broad range of legal issues with the military. “It’s a legal firm, plus all of the military benefits,” Wasliszewski said. “It’s a really exciting and challenging career, because you are not being pigeonholed to one specialty within the law, and every year you’re probably going to have a new assignment and be challenged in a new way.” Seniors Scott Lyle and Shayler Piersen will graduate with 18 Air Force ROTC cadets who will be commissioned after graduation. Lyle, who will graduate with a degree in aerospace engineering, said he is headed to Loughlin Air Force Base in Texas at the beginning of 2013 but will work a temporary job until then. “On Jan. 11 [2013], I will activate, pack up everything, go to Loughlin Air Force Base in Texas for several months and then eventually go to training in Pueblo, Colo. for a few weeks of training,” Lyle said. “Then I’ll go back to Loughlin to start undergraduate pilot training.” Piersen, a political science and history major, said he will enter the military intelligence branch of the Air Force upon graduation. He said he will begin seven months of training challenges, culminating in a series of examinations spanning three days. “A lot of intelligence training is learning to handle all of these different varieties of information ⎯ learning how to analyze types of pictures, intercept communications and work with satellites,” he said. Piersen said Notre Dame prepares its ROTC cadets particularly well for careers in the military, because the University inspires a deeper understanding of the same sense of service that inspired the cadets to enlist. “Notre Dame’s focus is on its mission in service, and that’s why we enter the military ⎯ we want to serve our country,” Piersen said. “Notre Dame instills that higher understanding of service and by facilitating that understanding of why we are serving our country, we are allowed to do that in a much better way.”last_img read more

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Governor to sign five bills into law today

first_imgGovernor Douglas will sign into law five pieces of legislation today at venues across the state:  S.26 An Act Relating to Recovery of Profits from Crime, the Disposition of Property Upon Death, Transfer of Interest in Vehicle Upon Death, Homestead Exemption, Unclaimed Property, Credit Card Fee Disputes, and Patient s Privilege; S.125 An Act Relating to Expanding the Sex Offender Registry; H.222 An Act Relating to Senior Protection and Financial Services; H.313 The Vermont Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009; and S.51 An Act Relating to Vermont s Motor Vehicle Franchise Laws.  The details for the bill signings are below.S. 26 and S.125S. 125 helps Vermont take another important step forward in protecting Vermonters, our children and our communities expanding Vermont s sex offender registry in several significant ways.  The bill also contains many provisions important to law enforcement in Vermont.  It allows law enforcement access to sealed records in appropriate cases, allows them access to corrections records that may be helpful in an investigation, it extends the statute of limitation on certain sex crimes, and makes it easier to investigate and prosecute cases where an offender fails to comply with sex offender registry requirements.S.26 includes a number of different provisions, but most importantly expands victim protection by not allowing the perpetrator of a crime to profit from a crime without paying money damages he or she may owe to a victim of their crime or reimbursing the State for the cost of prosecution or incarceration.DATE: Monday, June 1, 2009TIME: 9:30 a.m.LOCATION: Rutland Police Department 108 Wales Street Rutland, VermontH.222H. 222, An Act Relating to Senior Protection and Financial Services, contains several provisions to protect older Vermonters who purchase certain types of lending and insurance products. Governor Douglas noted, Vermont seniors are among our savviest citizens.  But they are also among our most vulnerable populations and can become targets for financial exploitation.  This bill helps protect the financial resources of older Vermonters by prohibiting opportunistic and unscrupulous practices that take advantage of seniors financial fears and circumstances.DATE: Monday, June 1, 2009TIME: 12:30 p.m.LOCATION: Waterbury Area Senior Center 14 Stowe Street Waterbury, VermontH.313H. 313 is a wide-ranging economic development bill.  At the signing ceremony, Governor Douglas will discuss aspects of the bill that will encourage job creation and help Vermont emerge from the recession.  He will also highlight other proposals to help small businesses and working Vermonters by making the state more competitive in attracting quality jobs for the 21st century.DATE: Monday, June 1, 2009TIME: 1:30 p.m.LOCATION: Governor s Ceremonial Office State House Montpelier, VermontS.51S. 51 is an important economic development bill for Vermont s new motor vehicle, motor home and motorcycle dealers, along with their estimated 3,000 employees.  It includes several important provisions that will provide assistance to dealers during this difficult economic time.DATE: Monday, June 1, 2009TIME: 2:30 p.m.LOCATION: Mid-State Dodge Hyundai 1365 Route 302 (Barre-Montpelier Road) Berlin, VermontSource: Governor’s Officelast_img read more

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US Navy Completes Medical SMEEs, Training in Peru

first_imgBy Mass Communication Specialist First Class Peter Lewis / Southern Partnership Station 2019 Public Affairs December 20, 2019 The Southern Partnership Station (SPS) 2019 Medical Engagement Team (MET) conducted their final mass casualty drill with Peruvian military medical personnel, October 21, culminating a month-long series of subject matter expert exchanges (SMEE) and field exercises.The U.S. and Peruvian medics conducted training on a variety of life-saving skills, including tactical combat casualty care (TCCC), massive hemorrhage control, patient movement, and water and waste treatment. The MET also used the “train the trainer” concept, teaching several Peruvian medics to act as instructors.“The ‘train the trainer’ concept we utilized will allow the Peruvian military to continue with training their service members in these tactical trauma care concepts, creating a medical force multiplier,” said U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Loren Nedelman, from Naval Branch Health Clinic Annapolis, the MET officer in charge.“This was a great experience for me, my fellow service members, and my country,” said Peruvian Navy Chief Warrant Officer Cilvio Moran Andrade. “As trained instructors, we can now provide our personnel with better knowledge to save their own lives and the lives of others, if necessary. We can now share these skills with all of our other units, even after our American partners return home. This interaction between our countries is a great benefit to our military.”The Peruvian military was not the only one to gain from the interactions. The MET agreed that they learned much from their Latin American counterparts, and that training with foreign partners is key when operating together during real-world missions.“Bringing their medical capabilities in line with our own will ensure that when we operate jointly, whether during exercises or humanitarian and disaster relief response, a common medical language will be spoken,” Lt. Cmdr. Nedelman said. “Utilizing the knowledge gained and shared during our mission ensures our ability to enhance cooperation and allows for us to build one team for one fight.”Several commandos from the Peruvian military direct-action troops participated in the training and mass casualty drill. They said that the training was “very beneficial and helpful in refreshing skills that we routinely use when on mission.”“This training was very important because the Americans brought us new techniques and helped us update our skills,” said Peruvian Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Abelino Benites Illescas. “We are pretty good at first aid, but this training will make us even better at tactical field care.”The Peruvian participants put the skills they learned into practice during the exercise. The mass casualty drill involved treatment of a large group of service members with simulated injuries such as lacerations, fractures, penetrating injuries, burns, and shock.SPS is an annual series of U.S. Navy deployments focused on exchanges with regional partner nation militaries and security forces. SPS 19 consists of fly-away deployments of adaptive force packages to Barbados, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, and Peru to conduct training and SMEEs to improve capacity in medical, dive operations, and engineering.SPS is part of U.S. Southern Command’s Enduring Promise initiative and reflects the United States’ enduring promise of friendship, partnership, and solidarity with the Caribbean, Central and South America.last_img read more

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Meeting challenges with a smile

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Challenges don’t scare Joe Gimble, CEO of $39 million asset Wilkes-Barre (Pa.) City Employees Federal Credit Union.When Gimble took over as CEO (or “Chief Everything Officer,” as he calls it), he faced a difficult and stressful situation.“The credit union was in the middle of a fraudulent loan scandal that was splattered all over the newspapers,” recalls Gimble. “The sheer task of changing the image of the credit union was hard enough. We also had to go through all loan and account folders, change or alter all policies and procedures, and pretty much rebuild the credit union from the ground up.”But as they say, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going,” and with the help of his team, Gimble managed to turn things around.The credit union increased loan volume, reduced charge-off s and allowances for loan and lease losses, and curtailed delinquencies. The institution also adopted risk-based lending, a new core processing system, a new debit card system, and mobile technologies. continue reading »last_img read more

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Wyandanch Woman Killed in Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 48-year-old woman was killed by a hit-and-run driver while walking along a street in her hometown of Wyandanch on Monday night, Suffolk County police said.Raina Campbell was walking on East Booker Avenue when she was stuck by a westbound vehicle that fled the scene at 6:56 p.m., police said.The victim was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, where she was pronounced dead.The vehicle fled toward Straight Path and may have front end damage. No further description of the vehicle or its driver was immediately available.Vehicular Crime Unit detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone who may have witnessed this crash or has any information about the incident to call them at 631-852-6555 or call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Harris quits to go solo

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Class divide in health widens, says thinktank

first_imgThe Guardian 23 August 2012The stark social class divide in health is widening as better-off people increasingly shun damaging habits such as smoking and eating badly but poorer people do not, authoritative new research reveals.The number of people in England who risk their health by engaging in “multiple lifestyle behaviours” such as smoking, drinking too much and physical inactivity is falling, according to a study by the influential King’s Fund health thinktank, shown to the Guardian.But it is middle-class people who are driving the trend, while the most disadvantaged remain stuck in a cycle of risky behaviour which increases their chances of developing a range of serious illnesses and will put “unavoidable pressure” on an already hard-pressed NHS, it says.The study covered 2003-08, a period in which the Labour government embarked on a massive campaign to persuade people to live healthier lives.The researchers found that people with no educational qualifications were more than five times as likely as those with degrees to engage in four key damaging behaviours in 2008, compared with three times as likely in 2003.The findings have cast doubt on the prospect of the health secretary, Andrew Lansley, fulfilling his pledge to “improve the health of the poorest fastest” in order to reduce glaring health inequalities. England’s richest citizens live seven years longer on average than their poorer neighbours. The report also reopens the debate over how to encourage poorer people to adopt healthier habits.http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/aug/23/class-divide-health-widens-thinktanklast_img read more

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Wednesday at Super Nationals

first_imgSuper Nationals nears car count record; Modifieds, Stocks begin qualifying today BOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – Day three of the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s boasts the first qualifying races Modifieds and Stock Cars, while last-chance races are on the docket for Hobby Stocks and SportMods.Hot laps are currently underway at Boone Speedway, where 277 Modifieds and 176 Stock Cars see their first action of the week.The Modified car count is up more than 20 from last year; total car count is currently 865, the second highest number in the 32-year history of Super Nationals. “Our car count is a reflection of our weekly racing. As our membership grows, so does the popularity of Super Nationals,” IMCA Vice President of Operations Brett Root said. “Plus, it’s a really cool place to be.” “This year’s Super Nationals is also a very fitting way to remember ‘Speedy’ Bill Smith and all that he and Speedway Motors have done for IMCA for so many years,” Root added.Thirty Modified heats and 20 Stock Car heats are on the Wednesday card. Two qualifying features will be held for each division to determine the front eight starters on the inside row of Saturday main events.Six drivers advance from last-chance features to the back two rows of Saturday main events for the Hobbies and the SportMods.***Jeff McCollum was planning to come to Boone Speedway as a spectator this week, but before taking the green flag last Saturday at Arlington Raceway he made a promise that if he won that evening’s IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature, he’d come to Boone and race instead. After winning for the 100th time in his IMCA career, the Mankato, Minn., driver made good on that promise. “The car has been working really good. If I could win this too, wouldn’t that be something?” asked McCollum, who qualified for the big show at Boone five years ago.The folks at Arlington presented McCollum with a special-made trophy following his landmark win. “It’s a pretty big trophy,” he said. “They had it made for me last year but it took a while for me to get it.” *His rapid ascension the past four weeks has taken A.J. Ward from 63rd to 54th, to 24th and ultimately to 10th in IMCA’s national point standings. The first-time Fast Shafts All-Star driver, from Ionia, Mich., counts nine wins among 29 top five finishes. He has yet to finish outside the top eight in 31 starts, no small achievement when you remember that he races weekly at Tri-City and Crystal.He aims to win track titles at both, with his sights on the state crown and Crystal’s Great Lakes Nationals special as well.“Making the dance at Super Nationals would cap everything off. Even if we finished last, it would be the highlight of my career,” said Ward, who made the nine-hour tow for the third time. “If I didn’t race weekly, I’d get a car just to come to this place. We look forward to Super Nationals all year.” ***Ethan Dotson joined fellow Bakersfield, Calif., pilots Levi Kiefer and Tina McGowan Tuesday as a qualifier for the Saturday night SportMod main event. The 15-year-old Independence High School sophomore has come to Super Nationals in the capacity of race fan the last two years. He finished fourth in his qualifier, in a borrowed ride. “It was better than anything I’ve ever done,” said Dotson, who had four feature wins and “way too many seconds” to show so far for his first full year in the division. “I’d be happy with a top five finish of Saturday but I’m always shooting for the win.”He raced in a local stock class before making the switch to a SportMod last season. “What I like best about this class is that we can race at any sanctioned track we want and don’t have to change the car,” Dotson said. “I like going to other tracks knowing we’ll be legal when we get there.*Having sealed the deal at 12:20 p.m. this afternoon, Tim Czarneski will race both his newly-purchased Stock Car and his Modified at Super Nationals this week. The Denmark, Wis., driver will be trying to match the 2004 accomplishment of buddy Benji LaCrosse in qualifying for main events in both divisions.“He did it, so I’ve got to do it, too, Czarneski said.A Modified regular at 141 Speedway – and a winner of one of the Red, White and Blue Series races there this season – Czarneski has just four Stock Car starts to his credit this season.Time is at an ever greater premium as Czarneski and his wife Leah welcomed their fourth son Reed on May 6. Family activities keep both busy and Czarneski has added Pop Warner football coach to his parental resume. This is the seventh September he’s brought a Modified to Super Nationals.“We look forward to this every year,” he said. “We have a good time and just keep coming back.”*1993 Super Nationals champion Ron Pope of Mason City will debut his Modified displaying a Hayden’s Hope wrap during Wednesday qualifying.He’s promoting awareness of the Hayden’s Hope Foundation, which has raised more than $100,000 for research into a cure for Friedreich’s Ataxia (a rare form of muscular dystrophy) and the foundation’s 5K/10K Warrior Run on Sept. 27 in downtown Mason City.Hayden Despenas, the son of family friends, was diagned with Friedreich’s Ataxia in May of 2012, when he was eight years old. Pope’s wife Kelly designed the wrap, done by Sybesma Graphics.“Hayden just loves race cars. It means a lot for us to be part of this,” Pope said. “There were quite a few emotions when we rolled the car out for the first viewing. People knew something was up because the race car trailer was there. It was very exciting.”***Tristan Carman got the last laugh on whoever it was that broke into his race shop three weeks ago. IMCA’s national Stock Car rookie of the year last season, the 17-year-old from Killeen had made plans to compete at Boone this week. Not long after, a thief or thieves tried to rain on his Super Nationals, stealing his tools, shocks, springs, set-up equipment … even his steering wheel. “Everything on the car and in the truck now is what we have left or borrowed,” he said. “After the break-in, we made it a point to come and so far Super Nationals has been everything I expected, except that there are a lot more cars.” “I’ve always wanted to run Super Nationals,” added Carman, armed with a new B & B Chassis. “And I want to win the show.” While the money was designated for Super Nationals expenses, Carman picked up some extra bucks before Boone the old-fashioned way: He shaved his beard.Phil Egbert, P.J. Egbert, Michael Walter, Kenny Stone and an anonymous donor pledged a total of $900 and Carman agreed to put his razor back to use.***Burg is best in last-chance feature for Hobby StocksBOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – A caution with three laps left made things more interesting, but Andrew Burg completed his green to checkered run at the front of the field to win Wednesday’s last-chance qualifying feature at Boone Speedway. He’ll be joined in the back two rows of Saturday’s IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s main event starting grid by Weston Koop, Tiffany Bittner, Kyle Parizek, Mike Traskow­sky and Justin Nehring. The start in the big dance will be Burg’s career third. Koop, Bittner, Traskowsky and Nehring all are in for the second time, Parizek for the first.***Ryerson reigns in SportMod last-chance featureBOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – Chad Ryerson caught Brandon Long at the line and led the last six laps in winning the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s last-chance qualifying feature for SportMods Wednesday afternoon.Ryerson had started on the pole but chased Long the first 18 times around the Boone Speedway. Michael Murphy slipped by Long with three to go for runner-up honors. The rest of the top six finishers advancing to the back two rows of Saturday’s main event were Clinton Luellen, Daniel Gottschalk and Ryan Hiscocks.Luellen is in the big dance for the fifth time in his career, Long for the second. Ryerson, Murphy, Gottschalk and Hiscocks are all first-time qualifiers.*The number of states represented at Super Nationals XXXII is an event record 27 as competing drivers hail from Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.Nine of those states were represented by the 10 drivers in the sixth Modified heat. Tom Berry Jr. (Oregon) and Joe German (Washington) made long trips from the scenic Pacific Northwest for their first Super Nationals and will get the opportunity to watch plenty of racing before getting on the track themselves. Both are in the 29th of 30 Wednesday night heats.***Gifford takes checkers ahead of Stock Car qualifying dramaBOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – He wasn’t part of the finish line drama, but Jerry Gifford was the winner of an IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s Stock Car qualifying feature that announcer Jerry Vansickel was quick to describe as epic.Gifford led all 25 laps of Wednesday’s first Stock qualifier at Boone Speedway. Travis VanStraten took over second place for good five laps in while 2001 champion Brian Blessington started 11th and cemented third with three laps left. The top four finishers advance to the inside row of Saturday’s main event and Brandon Taylor and Derek Green were both bound and determined to get it. After completing the 24th and next-to-last lap virtually bumper to bumper, the pair got together and slid sideways toward the finish line. Abe Huls and Terry Pruitt both took advantage and drove by, with Huls getting fourth and the transfer spot. Taylor was scored sixth, Green seventh.Top four finishers from each of the two qualifiers will square off in games of roshambo on Thursday in the fan zone to determine inside row starting positions.Blessington is now a 12-time qualifier for the main event. VanStraten is in for the fifth time, Huls the third and Gifford the first.Schmidt scores big in second Stock Car qualifierBOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – Jay Schmidt led all but the first lap and held off defending champion Brandon Czarapata in winning Wednesday’s second IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s Stock Car qualifying feature at Boone Speedway. Schmidt started fourth and drove by Trent Murphy on the second circuit; after a lap 21 caution, Czarapata used the ensuing restart to his advantage to take over the runner-up spot.He couldn’t reel in Schmidt, however. Murphy was third while Kyle Vanover made a last-lap charge to steal the fourth and final qualifying spot from Nathan Wood.Top four finishers from each Wednesday qualifier will play roshambo in the fan zone to determine how they’ll line up on the inside row for Saturday’s main event.Schmidt will start his career 12th Super Nationals main event, Czarapata his 10th, Murphy his seventh straight in the division and 10th overall. Vanover made the show for the third time.***Stone, Jergens to decide pole for Super Nationals Modified main event BOONE, Iowa (Sept. 3) – Californian Paul Stone or home state driver Mike Jergens will start on the pole when the biggest event in dirt track racing goes green Saturday night at Boone Speed­way. Stone ran second the last 19 laps of Wednesday’s first IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s Modified qualifying feature, then was promoted to the top spot when Adam Lar­son failed to meet frame specifications in post-race tech. Jergens had tracked down and race-long leader Kyle Strickler in lapped traffic with a couple cir­cuits to go in the second qualifier. Strickler became a DQ from the runner-up spot for use of unapproved wheels; Chase Allen crossed the line in third and also failed post-race tech for failing to meet frame specs. Stone and Jergens will duke it out in a game of roshambo, in the fan zone south of the main grand­stand, on Thursday to determine who gets the coveted pole position in Saturday night’s main event. They’ll be joined on the inside row by top three finishers Aaron Turnbull, 2011 champion Richie Gustin and Jay Noteboom from the first qualifier and Johnny Saathoff, Troy Jerovetz and Josh Most from the second.Gustin had started 13th and Noteboom 15th in the first qualifier. Jergens took the initial green from 13th, Jerovetz from 16th, Most from 28th and Saathoff from dead last in the 30-car second qualify­ing field. Saathoff made the big dance for the 14th time in his career, Noteboom for the ninth and Gustin for the fourth. Stone, Jergens, Turnbull and Most all are second-time main event qualifiers while Jerovetz is in the big show for the first time.last_img read more

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Syracuse’s seniors get win of careers against No. 13 Louisville in final home game

first_img Published on March 5, 2013 at 2:06 am Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2 Facebook Twitter Google+ When it was all done, Carmen Tyson-Thomas stepped back onto the Carrier Dome floor and looked around. It finally dawned on her: She would never play there again.“I’m not really an emotional person,” Tyson-Thomas said, “but I was just like, ‘Damn.’”For the final time, Syracuse’s seniors took the floor in the Dome and came away with the biggest victory in their four years with the Orange. No. 24 SU (23-6, 11-5 Big East) upset No. 13 Louisville (23-7, 11-5) 68-57 on Senior Night to snap a three-game losing streak, lock up the No. 3 seed in the Big East tournament and give Syracuse its first win over a ranked opponent this season. All three seniors in the rotation – Tyson-Thomas, Elashier Hall and Kayla Alexander – scored in double figures Monday with Alexander’s 16 points leading the way.The Orange’s seniors have knocked off ranked teams during their careers – when they were freshmen, SU upset then-No. 7 West Virginia in the regular-season finale – but with NCAA and Big East tournament positioning on the line, the stakes against a ranked team had never been higher.“Given the time and the place, this is what we needed. We needed this win,” Tyson-Thomas said, agreeing with Hall’s sentiment that this was the biggest win of their careers. “Because we wanted to finish on a strong note and kind of make a statement.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We made a statement that we could grind on this kind of level and play with the big dogs.”Fellow senior Shanee Williams joined Hall, Alexander and Tyson-Thomas on the court 15 minutes before tipoff to be honored during Senior Night. About 20 minutes later, the four took the floor again when Tyson-Thomas and Williams subbed in to join starters Hall and Alexander at the 18:44 mark.The four seniors stayed on the floor together for three minutes as the Cardinals reeled off an 8-0 run, putting Syracuse in an early 8-3 hole. The Orange eventually headed into halftime trailing 29-27. Alexander played less that than nine minutes due to foul trouble, and Hall and Tyson-Thomas had combined for just two field goals.In the second half, though, the seniors stabilized SU. Syracuse used a 16-0 run in the second half to take control before Hall, Alexander and Tyson-Thomas closed it out for the Orange.“Our seniors made some big plays,” Hillsman said. “ … We made a couple huge shots.”With 1:15 remaining, a 15-point SU lead shrunk to just four. Two 3s by UofL guard Shoni Schimmel put Syracuse’s Senior Night in doubt. Hall got fouled and went to the line. The last two times an SU player went to the line, she missed the front end of a one-and-one. But Hall was cool, knocking down both to stretch the lead to six.Schimmel missed a 3-pointer on the other end and Hall grabbed the rebound. She passed to Tyson-Thomas, who fired to Alexander for a transition layup, sealing the game with 30 seconds remaining.“I just wanted us to win,” Alexander said with a laugh. “Just trying to play basketball. It didn’t really hit me.”The three seniors cracked jokes about each other during the postgame press conference, recalling memories from their freshman years and touching on what makes them all special as players. All three finished their careers with 1,000 points. But what Hillsman said makes this senior class so unique is the different personalities.The Class of 2009 didn’t arrive at Syracuse with lofty expectations. Still, it came together, made sacrifices – Hillsman said Tyson-Thomas’ willingness to come off of the bench was key to the season – and now appears all but certain it will guide the Orange back to the NCAA Tournament.Alexander said she still doesn’t feel her goal of reaching the tournament has been achieved. But Monday night, Hillsman, who had been reluctant to say his team would qualify for the NCAA Tournament, even after 22 wins, could finally concede it.Said Hillsman, grinning from ear to ear: “I think we’re in now.” Commentslast_img read more

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Trojans hold last practice before Thursday’s game

first_imgNo. 13 USC’s Thursday night game against Utah is approaching quickly, and the Trojans are thinking about the atmosphere in Salt Lake City.Familiar foe · Sophomore wide receiver Marqise Lee and the Trojans beat Utah 23-14 in 2011. The game was decided on a last-second blocked field goal. – Carlo Acenas | Daily Trojan“We talk about weathering the storm when you go on the road any time, especially if it’s a Thursday night game in an environment like it’ll be,” USC coach Lane Kiffin said. “[Utah] is going to make some plays. It’s going to happen.”The Trojans are coming off a bye week, and it was after their bye week last season when the team seemed to click against Cal. This season, USC says the week off helped it in multiple cases.“We’re in the best physical shape that we’ve been all year long,” Kiffin said. “It allowed us to clean up some things in all three phases of the game. It was good for our players to get away, from everyday being around [the coaches].”USC will be facing a Utah offense that has had a very slow start to the season. The Utes rank last in the Pac-12 with less than 300 yards of offense per game.—Though USC’s pass rush has been impressive thus far, there have been holes in the secondary. But one defensive back has stood out in practice lately.“[Freshman cornerback] Kevon Seymour played really well,” Kiffin said. “As we go throughout the season, we’ll look to expand his role at some point. It’s good to have a young corner like that.”The Trojans will face a tough test against Utah’s defense, led by their interior defensive lineman Star Lotulelei, expected to be a top-10 selection in next April’s NFL draft.“He can make so many plays. The penetration is such an issue, even if he’s not making a play, he’s making running backs bounce on runs and the quarterback move around,” Kiffin said.A potential key matchup in the game will be Lotelelei against senior center Khaled Holmes. But Kiffin simply said he hopes Holmes plays, and he didn’t provide an update to Khaled’s injury status.USC’s running game has been significantly better with Holmes on the field, so his status for the game figures to be pivotal.last_img read more

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