New minor emphasizes interdisciplinary aspect of real estate

first_imgThe Fitzgerald Institute for Real Estate recently launched an interdisciplinary minor in real estate, which is open to all undergraduate students.“The minor is 15 credits, with an introductory course, three electives of three credits each in a variety of different areas … and the last three credits of the minor are these industry engaging colloquia,” Eugenio Acosta, program director of the Institute for Real Estate, said.The colloquia are one-credit seminars that bring in people from the industry to talk about their work. The first being offered is Real Estate Finance and Investment this fall.“It brings in experts on the business and law side to talk to students about real cases, real issues and connect students with what they would be doing out in the real world, with the kind of jobs that are out there and the experiences they will have,” Acosta said.Students and alumni from Notre Dame have long been interested in real estate, but until now there was no way to quantify the courses they had been taking.“For years, we’ve had faculty and courses in real estate but no real way to capture a student’s interest,” Acosta said. “But now students who take those courses can get a minor, so this is a way to help them better prepare for industry, with jobs and internships, by giving them credit for what they do — but also enhance the opportunities and create new courses.”Since the minor applications were opened this semester, 53 students have applied for the minor. However, due to the course requirements only current freshman and sophomores will be able to complete it in time for graduation.“There has been almost double the demand at what we thought there would be for the minor so far,” Jason Arnold, managing director of the Institute for Real Estate, said.The nature of the minor is interdisciplinary, Acosta said. He said this reflects the multifaceted nature of the real estate industry, offering classes in three different colleges —  the School of Architecture, the College of Engineering and Mendoza College of Business.“I’m excited that it’s going to be a very diverse group, and truly interdisciplinary. If you look at the numbers, a quarter of our students are going to be Arts and Letters, and 8 percent are STEM,” Acosta said. “Mixing engineers with some science folks and some arts and letters and putting them together with the business students is going to be a great learning experience.”Acosta said it is important to have an background stemming from multiple areas when going into real estate.“Real estate is a very applied field and very interdisciplinary,” he said. “You can come in on it from the finance side, the architecture side or the engineering side. So it’s great to have a base academic discipline and to enhance it with a minor on the applied side.”Through the requirement to take at least one elective course outside the student’s academic home, the minor’s interdisciplinary nature is shown.“I’m excited that students are going to take more real estate classes and that there is an outlet for that,” Arnold said. “They’re going to be pushed to take things outside of their own discipline to learn about what makes up real estate at large.”Tags: College of Engineering, Fitzgerald Institute for Real Estate, mendoza college of business, Real Estate minor, School of Architecturelast_img read more

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Philanthropy class allocates funding to local non-profits

first_imgAmong the many unique courses offered by Notre Dame, only one is accompanied by a grant worth tens of thousands of dollars to be awarded to nonprofits in the Michiana area.Notre Dame professor Jonathan Hannah is teaching “Philanthropy and Society” for the first year it is offered at the University. The funding, he said, comes from an outside group.“The class is interesting in that it’s sponsored by a nonprofit called the Philanthropy Lab. They’re an organization based in Texas. We’re about one of 20 partner schools that offer this class,” he said. “This lab, they grant us between $50,000 and $70,000 to give to the community. The students get to sort of create their own mini-foundation and decide ‘What is the best place to invest this money in our local community?’”The Philanthropy Lab has worked with over 29 other U.S. colleges and universities to offer similar courses, giving, along with their donor partners, over $9 million since the group was founded in 2011. Hannah said deciding where the money is awarded is entirely up to the students.“I really don’t influence the grantmaking at all,” he said. “It’s totally on the students. The students get to decide which nonprofits to visit, and then over the next two weeks we’re going to have votes and decide where this money is going to ultimately go.”Though the class is taught through the political science department and the Hesburgh Public Policy program, it is open to all students. Senior Laksumi Sivanandan said she was drawn to the course after a summer internship at the University’s development office.“I worked as an intern for Notre Dame’s development office this summer. As a result, I became really interested in fundraising and philanthropy,” Sivanandan said in an email. “I wanted to learn more about philanthropy through lenses other than higher education, and this class has certainly helped with that.”Senior Evan DaCosta — another student taking the class — was motivated to take the class after reading about how bad actors can abuse the philanthropy process.(Editor’s Note: DaCosta is a former news and sports writer for The Observer.) “It was two things,” he said. “One, it fit my schedule well. Two, it was right at the time when all of the [Jeffrey] Epstein stuff was coming out and people were talking a lot about his philanthropic activity — because he had donated a lot of money to Harvard, MIT and all these schools — so people were criticizing philanthropy at that time as a way people could cover their tracks. … It was topical and newsworthy at the time, so I thought it would be interesting. I didn’t realize at the time that we would be getting money to actually do stuff with.”While the class focuses somewhat on general philanthropic principles, much of the instruction time is spent on hands-on activities as students decide how the money is ultimately going to be awarded, student and sophomore Ciara Donovan explained.“The structure of the class and the way Professor Hannah runs things is really different than any class I’ve ever taken,” she said. “Basically, about 60% of our class days are normal lectures in which we talk about varying topics under the category of philanthropy. But the other classes are what we call ‘board meetings’ and every member of our class together acts as a board of directors for our nonprofits. We each have different roles on the board. During these board meetings, we get to vote on issues, and it’s cool because I know the issues we’re voting on will have a real impact on my immediate community.”At the beginning of the semester, the class — which Hannah said has 25 students — self-sorted into groups based on interest areas. They then compiled a list of potential nonprofits to work with using sources such as the Center for Social Concerns and word of mouth, among others. The groups then narrowed their respective searches to two local nonprofits, which they then visited. DaCosta and Donovan are in the same group, which has worked with an immigrant resettlement program called Neighbor to Neighbor as well as a conservation group called the Shirley Heinze Land Trust. Sivanandan’s group has worked with children’s hospital A Rosie Place for Children, as well as The Logan Center, an organization that assists individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.As the semester wraps up, the class will gather in a board setting to allocate the money to five nonprofits. The amount of money the group will ultimately receive from the Philanthropy Lab varies, for example Hannah said the class receives $2,000 per student enrolled up to the twenty-fifth student. Another incentive involves the attendance of a respective school’s top official: if University President Fr. John Jenkins attends the award ceremony — due to be held Dec. 5 — the Notre Dame group will receive a further $10,000 to award.The president’s office originally declined the class’ invitation for Jenkins to attend the ceremony, DaCosta said.“The Philanthropy Lab … offers an extra $10,000 incentive if you get your university president to come to your award ceremony when you give the groups the money,” DaCosta said. “When we first asked him, his secretary wrote back and said he is too busy with travel and everything to come. Then the team that’s responsible for planning the award ceremony reached out again and have not heard anything back from him.”However, Hannah said in a follow-up email he had heard from Jenkins that the university president’s attendance at the event is still a possibility.“Actually, Fr. John just wrote us this weekend and he’s trying to make the awards ceremony — but not confirmed yet,” he said.Sivanandan expressed hope that Jenkins could attend.“It is a pretty low-stakes commitment, as he does not have to speak or present the awards, so hopefully he is able to attend for about 30 minutes or so,” she said.While the class has many potential applications, DaCosta said he has learned a lot about the often-complicated nature of philanthropic work.“It’s a much larger world than I thought it was at first,” he said. “I always thought it was pretty straightforward — you just pick a group and a cause that you like and give money to them. It’s a lot more than that. You have to be able to analyze how efficient a group is, if their executives are being paid more than they should be … there’s a lot that goes into choosing a group that will do actual good with your money rather than just kind of squandering it.”For her part, Sivanandan said the class provides an excellent opportunity to get real-world experience.“The fact that we have at least $50,000 to award to local nonprofits is insane. Who would ever trust college students with that much money? Being in such a hands-on class is so illuminating and empowering, as we are essentially acting as grantmakers,” she said. “This class provides a great education on the intersection of philanthropy, business, and nonprofit organizations that students probably would not receive without work experience in the nonprofit world.”Moving forward, Hannah said he will offer the class again next fall. In the meantime, the class is looking for a donor to allow the Notre Dame course to become financially independent, as the Philanthropy Lab reallocates funding to other schools so they can start up their own programs.“The Philanthropy Lab basically awards grants to certain universities with the intent of teaching college-aged students the importance of philanthropy, kind of under the idea that no amount of giving is too small, whether that’s time or money,” Donovan said. “Obviously, they have given us a pretty large sum of money with which we can make what I believe to be a pretty big difference with certain nonprofits. But the Philanthropy Lab’s hope is that eventually, schools become self-sufficient and get funded by an independent donor so the lab can redirect their funds to another school, and allow more students to have the opportunity to give. Something that’s important to our class is to get eventually, in the next few years, a donor to back the class, so that we can continue having such an incredible opportunity for students but also so that other schools can experience the same thing.”Tags: Michiana, philanthropy, Philanthropy and Society, Philanthropy Lab, University President Fr. John Jenkinslast_img read more

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Student organizations continue work while away from campus

first_imgAs the spread of COVID-19 causes massive social and economic disruption, Notre Dame student organization leaders continue to advocate for students to have a voice, support and access to opportunities. Incoming Notre Dame student body president and vice president juniors Rachel Ingal and Sarah Galbenski have been working closely with many members of the administration — including the Division of Student Affairs, the Student Activities Office (SAO) and the University Emergency Committee — to determine how internal operations and transitions will proceed for student government and clubs. Ingal said the priorities of student government have not changed during this time of uncertainty.“During such a rapidly fluctuating time, the focus so far has been on the most vulnerable students and the wellbeing of the Notre Dame family, as it should be,” Ingal said.Members of student government are focusing on a different aspect each week to adapt to the evolving needs of students while adjusting to life away from campus, Galbenski said.“Last week’s focus was health and safety,” she said. “This week’s focus is on academic coursework. Next week or the week after is when extracurriculars are planned to resume.”These extracurriculars are expected to take place using an online format, Galbenski added.Due to the international pandemic, the current session of the student senate and the student constitution have been suspended, according to an announcement on the senate website last Saturday. The official transition of swearing in newly elected student government leaders into office was previously scheduled to take place on April 1. This transition is suspended until a senate meeting can virtually take place. Galbenski said the later transition date does not affect the position appointments.“Fortunately, we were able to hold our interviews for our executive cabinet the week before spring break and make our final deliberations and decisions over spring break,” Galbenski said. “When extracurriculars resume, the senate and the constitution will be unsuspended. We should then be able to have a meeting, if possible.” The incumbent student body president, senior Elizabeth Boyle, and vice president, junior Patrick McGuire, will remain in power until the new elects can officially transition.Ingal said she and Galbenski have been in contact with the administration involving concerns about pass-fail classes, logistics for pro-rates for spring semester room and board charges to student accounts and decisions regarding the Class of 2020.“We haven’t had super in-depth discussions on how grades or transcripts are going to look yet,” Ingal said. “We have been dealing with the most pressing issues of crisis management right now. We have let our contacts know about the pass-fail petition and Elizabeth [Boyle] and Pat [McGuire] have been echoing those concerns as well. The administration has been handling the situation with a lot of empathy and I would imagine they are going to continue to handle it that way.”The Club Coordination Council (CCC) — the Student Union organization that oversees, allocates funding for and represents undergraduate student clubs — is also allowing time for students to adjust before announcing plans on how the spring allocation process will proceed digitally.“Our top priority is for the campus community to be healthy and safe,” incoming CCC president and junior Ricardo Pozas Garza said. “We don’t want to give students another reason to worry while many are still working on finding a safe place to continue their studies.”More details, including a timeline for due dates, on the spring allocation process will be released after the first week of online classes, Pozas Garza said.“Thankfully a lot of the process is already digital,” he said. “The CCC Executive Board is working on developing guidelines for how meetings will be conducted.”Many student clubs and organizations have already informed their members of canceled events originally set to take place after spring break, including a number of Student International Business Council (SIBC) projects, Mock Trial Nationals, Habitat for Humanity builds and the musical production of “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Additionally, clubs such as the Harper Cancer Research Institute Society, the American Medical Women’s Association and the Asian American Association have already begun moving their respective elections online via Google polls and slides.The Nancy Kerrigan visit, SUB concert, and advising process for first years in student government to learn how to plan SAO events were also canceled, senior and Student Union Board (SUB) executive director Eric Kim said.SIBC — the largest student organization on campus, with nearly 1,000 active members — allocates most of its budget to providing students with national and international networking opportunities. Year-round, students research and work on projects to present to partner companies including Microsoft, the “Big Four” accounting firms and Goldman Sachs. Junior and SIBC president David Torgerson said the new off-campus circumstances will not have a huge impact on student projects this semester.“Out of the 60 projects, the majority of them will be continuing virtually,” Torgerson said. “A lot of the budget that would’ve been allocated to travel will be reallocated to future semesters.”Given that one of the primary visions of SIBC is “Peace Through Commerce,” Torgerson and SIBC vice president and junior Jennifer Paul said they remain optimistic about how SIBC is going to continue this vision in light of the crisis. “There’s even more of a call for peace now,” Paul said. “Business is down, but it will be up again. I think it’s important to maintain those relationships and build our networks. If we lose commitment now, it’s going to be that much harder to get it back up in the future.”Amidst the uncertainty, Ingal said Notre Dame students have been committed to support and help each other respond to adversity.“This is a time when we are finding the true strength and resilience of the Notre Dame family,” Ingal said. “It’s something that will continue to grow and hopefully, we just come out stronger on the other end of this.”Tags: CCC, coronavirus, COVID-19, Extracurriculars, Notre Dame Student Government, SIBClast_img read more

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ND COVID-19 case reported 3 days before classes begin

first_imgA member of the Notre Dame community has tested positive for COVID-19, according to a Friday email from Paul Browne, vice president for public affairs and communications.The email said the individual and six others who came into close contact with them are now in quarantine. A public dashboard will be available next week to provide the Notre Dame community with daily updates regarding campus cases.“Please remember to wear your masks, socially distance, and wash your hands frequently, and complete your daily health check,” Browne said.Tags: COVID-19, covid-19 response unit, fall semester 2020last_img

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SAO hosts virtual Activities Fair after rescheduling in-person event

first_imgEvery year, thousands of students attend the Student Activities Office (SAO) Activities Night to sign up and learn about the different clubs, organizations and campus partners that are present at Notre Dame.With the ongoing pandemic making social distancing a necessity, the event — rebranded as Activities Fair — looked a little different. Instead of storming to the booths, with just one click students were able to enter the participating groups’ Zoom calls and talk with representatives Sunday from 2 to 6 p.m.According to assistant director of student clubs Erin Riordan, SAO had initially sought to host the event in-person. However, logistical concerns and professional feedback prompted the group to organize the event virtually instead.“Last year we received 3,000 to 4,000 students,” Riordan said. “Our concern was if we have it outside, how do we properly manage the lines and waiting areas if such a large capacity of students come? We asked students, talked to our campus partners, talked to Risk & Management to pose them a full list of pros and cons.”Even though, students were not able to attend in-person, Riordan said holding the event in this manner allowed for greater accessibility and efficiency.“I think what’s really cool about having [the event] virtually is that students have been able to look at all the clubs at once, fill out the interest sheets they want to fill out but not actually go into the Zoom meetings, which makes it more accessible than an in-person fair,” she said.Senior Mariana Ferré, who attended the event, echoed Riordan in acknowledging the virtual format’s benefits.“I liked that I could see everything. I feel that sometimes when we’re in the stadium it’s so packed I might miss a table accidentally. So it’s nice to have everything in one place,” Ferré saidFor senior Jessica Igiede, the president of on-campus dance group Project Fresh, the virtual fair was an opportunity to have students become acquainted with the club. However, Igiede said there were some shortcomings.“Usually in person, people are just able to see us dancing and having fun, so you’re able to see our vibe,” she said. “Here, we hope that people are kind of getting that from the slide.”The groups’ presentations were divided into time blocks. From 2 to 3 p.m., campus offices, student organizations and graduate student groups engaged with students. From 3 to 4 p.m., academic and athletic clubs had their pitch. From 4 to 5 p.m., cultural and performing arts clubs were up. Finally, from 5 to 6 p.m., the different social service and special interest clubs talked about their work.From Mariachi bands to juggling clubs, the approximately 300 clubs, organizations and campus partners strived to spark the interest of students.“We’re happy to be here to engage more students and just say that you don’t have to have experience juggling. We have so many people who come back who have never juggled before. So don’t be intimidated, don’t let that be a factor in why you don’t come to Juggling Club,” said junior Tanner Waltz, vice-president of Juggling Club.Even though the Puerto Rican Student Association’s (PRSAND) mission is to foster a greater community within the University’s Puerto Rican students, junior Diego Silva, PRSAND’s outreach coordinator, said the club also aims to shed light on the island’s culture — something the event enabled him to do.“We really want to raise awareness about Puerto Rico’s culture and identity,” Silva said. “Coming to the Activities Fair is a good starting point to elevate our club.”Riordan said the event was all about embracing the new ways in which people can connect amid a health crisis.“There has been such a focus on what people and students can’t do. We want to be the office that helps people recognize what they can do,” Riordan said. “There’s still opportunity to find a community here. I know connection is difficult right now, but there’s so many clubs, people and offices that want to support students from the tri-campus community.”Tags: activities fair, Project Fresh, Student Activities Officelast_img read more

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Notre Dame police arrest man on campus with felony charge

first_imgAccording to a University press release, the Notre Dame Police Department (NDPD) arrested Michael James Thompson, 19, Wednesday morning near the Eck Baseball Stadium after receiving a report of erratic driving from Roseland Police around 9 a.m. Thompson is from Beverly Shores, Ind.Thompson is not a Notre Dame student but was on campus to meet a Notre Dame freshman who was a high school acquaintance. He refused to allow the student to leave his vehicle, but she later escaped unharmed, the release said.Thompson was charged with felony criminal confinement, reckless driving and driving without a license. He was transferred to the St. Joseph County Jail. The case has been turned over to the St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office.Tags: Notre Dame Police Department, police arrest, reckless drivinglast_img read more

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Woman Accused For Fraudulently Receiving $6,000 In Assistance

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock ImageOLEAN – A Cattaraugus County woman is facing several felony charges after she was accused of fraudulently receiving more than $6,000 in public assistance.The Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Office says Brittany Goss, 28, of Machias, allegedly concealed and failed to report income in her household while receiving government assistance.In total, deputies say Goss received $6,664. The arrest, investigators say, stems from a 2015 incident.Goss is charged with third-degree felony grand larceny; third-degree felony welfare fraud and two felony counts of first-degree false instrument for filling. Depuites say Goss turned herself in at the Department of Social Services in Olean and was released with an appearance ticket. She is due to appear in Olean City Court next month.last_img read more

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Area Schools Feeling COVID-19 Impacts

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Cropped eflon / Flickr / CC BY 2.0 JAMESTOWN – Several local schools are feeling impacts of COVID-19 after teachers, staff and students tested positive for the virus this week.Another employee with Jamestown Public Schools tested positive for COVID-19 this Thursday. School officials say the district staff member was last working on Thursday, October 29 and likely did not have contact with co-workers while sick.This is the second employee of the district to test positive this week. Additionally, just this week three students from various school buildings also tested positive for the virus.Other local schools are also working to contain COVID-19 within their districts. Cassadaga Valley Central School closed both their elementary and middle/high school buildings on Friday after a staff member at both locations tested positive for the virus.After cleaning, school officials there expect to reopen the buildings next week.The Panama Central School District is also delaying the return of some of their in-person learning. School leaders report students in 7th, 9th, and 12th grades will return to full-time in-person learning in February.The school is currently following a hybrid schedule with mixed remote and in-person instruction.last_img read more

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Rabbit Hole, Starring Downton’s Joanne Froggatt, Postponed in London’s West End

first_imgThe previously announced West End production of David Lindsay-Abaire’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play Rabbit Hole, starring Downton Abbey’s Joanne Froggatt, has been postponed. The production, directed by Nigel Harman, had been scheduled for a limited engagement at the Vaudeville Theatre September 11 through November 22. The producers said in a statement that the change was “due to a late shift in schedules.” Forbidden Broadway will now run at the theater instead. The Tony nominated Rabbit Hole follows the story of Becca and Howie Corbett, parents who have all that a family could wish for, until one day their world is suddenly turned upside down. Eight months following that life-shattering incident the young couple find themselves drifting perilously apart. Rabbit Hole charts their search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day. Rabbit Hole was first produced on Broadway in 2006, with Cynthia Nixon playing Becca. Nixon received the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for her performance. Lindsay-Abaire later adapted his stage play into a film starring Nicole Kidman. View Comments Froggatt’s stage credits include The Knowledge/Little Platoons, All About My Mother, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Playhouse Creatures and Be My Baby. In addition to her role on Downton, her screen credits include The Secrets, True Love, The Royle Family, Identity, Moving On, Murder in the Outback, The Street, Missing, Dinner Ladies and Coronation Street, Still Life, Filth, U Want Me 2 Kill Him?, In Our Name, Echoes, Outside Inn and Miranda.last_img read more

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How to Get Away With Murder on Broadway? Check Out Our Killer Dream Cast

first_img Jeremy Jordan as Connor Walsh (played onscreen by Jack Falahee) This cocky heartbreaker has the hottest sex scenes and the slyest sense of humor. Raise your hand if you don’t want to see a scruffy Jordan literally screwing evidence out of some cute unsuspecting guy. Thought so. Condola Rashad as Michaela Pratt (played onscreen by Aja Naomi King) Rashad is long due to make her musical debut, and she has a lot in common with Michaela—they are both gorgeous, accomplished and poised. And we’re dying to hear her two songs: “Prenup?!?” and “Give Me the Goddamn Trophy!” Jenn Colella as Bonnie Winterbottom (played onscreen by Liza Weil) Bonnie is professional, no-nonsense and has a class-A (and much needed) bullshit detector; she’s also full of surprises. In fact, she’s the character that ends up in the twistiest of plot twists. Colella is a beltress, who can be tough (see Chaplin), gentle (see If/Then) and has the perfect haircut (see her in real life). Lena Hall as Rebecca Sutter (played onscreen by Katie Findlay) Hedwig Tony winner Hall is perfect for Rebecca, everyone’s favorite enigmatic drug-dealing neighbor: she can rock leather, heavy eyeliner and biker boots with the best of them—plus, we totally believe she plays her music loud. Kyle Beltran as Wes Gibbins (played onscreen by Alfred Enoch) Wes seems like the boy next door, but there is so much more going on behind that puppy-dog exterior. Enter the golden-voiced Beltran, who has the looks, exuberance and captivating smile that would have any one of us believing him when he said heads and knew it was tails. Cristin Milioti as Laurel Castillo (played onscreen by Karla Souza) Like many characters on HTGAWM, Laurel is not what she seems. You think she’s quiet and unassuming, and then BLAM! Suddenly she’s banging Frank in the backseat of his car. And wait a sec—does she even like Frank? Milioti has the right blend of naivete and sensuality to capture both sides of Laurel. We were over the moon when Tony winner Viola Davis got a big, juicy TV role in ABC’s How to Get Away with Murder. As intimidating law professor/defense attorney Annalise Keating, Davis gives us her signature snot-nosed crying scenes, shows off a slick exterior and then pulls off the drag to bare her soul. The winter finale on November 20 promises to answer one of the most compelling hashtags questions of the fall: Who Killed Sam? So how are we preparing for this revelation? By dreaming about a Broadway musical version, of course. See below for our fantasy picks for the cast of How to Get Away with Murder—The Musical! Will Chase as Sam Keating (played onscreen by Tom Verica) Yeah, he’s a lying, cheating dead man, but that doesn’t mean this “Mr. Darcy” won’t have a couple of fantastic duets in our made-up musical. Chase is alluring with an underbelly of menace (note Edwin Drood). Imagine him flirting with virginal co-ed Lila and sparring with edgy bartender Rebecca. Ooh!center_img LaChanze as Annalise Keating (played onscreen by Viola Davis) There are a lot of Broadway divas who could rock Annalise’s tough attitude and killer heels. (We seriously considered Billy Porter for this part.) But If/Then star LaChanze not only has serious acting chops and a phenomenal voice, she also has the right amount of charm, cheekiness and vulnerability to make Annalise sing. Get ready for the end of Act I number, “Why Is Your Penis on a Dead Girl’s Phone?” Samantha Hill as Lila Stanguard (played onscreen by Megan West) Yeah, yeah, we know: another dead person. But in flashbacks, she’s sweet, sexy and (no doubt) a soprano. Hill would nail it. Now more importantly, who killed her? And #WhoKilledSam? Also, is it on yet? Skylar Astin as Asher Millstone (played onscreen by Matt McGorry) Privileged, competitive and ever-awkward, Asher is both endearing and infuriating. He also has the best one-liners. With Astin in the role, you’d secretly root for him even as you’re rolling your eyes. Bryan Terrell Clark as Nate Lahey (played onscreen by Billy Brown) “What’s Going On” now has double meaning. Clark knocked us out as Marvin Gaye in Motown on Broadway, and in our dream cast, he’s Nate, a tough cop, who also happens to be Annalise’s man on the side. Here’s a guy who has the ability to be good even when he’s naughty. Sexual healing, anyone? Hunter Foster as Frank Delfino (played onscreen by Charlie Weber) Foster would make a great Frank, who’s unafraid of hard work—even if that work gets a little dirty. He’s a local tough guy with a weakness for sleeping with students. How many characters that Foster has played can be described as loyal, street smart and just a little unseemly? Just saying. View Commentslast_img read more

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