Despite setbacks political will to end Yemen war stronger than ever top

Martin Griffiths, said in a newspaper interview with Asharq Al-Awsat, and in a series of tweets reflecting his remarks, that the “biggest challenge is not to fail the people of Yemen” as the Government forces and their coalition backers, attempt to secure the first stages of a tentative peace deal with rebel Houthi leaders, that was inked in Sweden last December, and brokered by the UN.Mr. Griffiths said that a deadline set for the withdrawal of Houthi fighters in Hudaydah, the crucial port that carries the vast majority of life-saving aid and goods into the country, had been delayed, and said that planned prisoner exchange talks, were still a work in progress.We have seen the two parties demonstrate remarkable political will, first to reach a ceasefire agreement, and then to abide by it. What we need to see now is the implementation of the provisions…fully and rapidly – UN Special Envoy, Martin GriffithsHe also confirmed that the retired Dutch General Patrick Cammaert, who has been leading an advance UN mission tasked with overseeing the ceasefire deal, and talks between Government and Houthi negotiators who are part of the Redeployment Coordination Committee (RCC), was stepping down. He denied that any disagreements had resulted in his resignation.”There is no element of truth to such reports. As a matter of fact, General Cammaert and I have been working closely to close the gap between the two parties on the operational implementation of the Hodeidah Agreement”, he told the Arabic language newspaper.“Our meetings with all the parties were very constructive last week. General Cammaert’s plan was to stay in Yemen for a rather short period of time, to activate the RCC and lay the ground for establishing the Hodeidah mission,” he added.The Special Envoy said that it was “important not to lose sight of the big picture necessary to resolve the conflict in Yemen. A framework that will draw a road map towards a political agreement will provide us with a basis for the end game; that is the political solution for the conflict there.”He added that “we have seen the two parties demonstrate remarkable political will, first to reach a ceasefire agreement, and then to abide by it. What we need to see now is the implementation of the provisions of the agreement, fully and rapidly.”He acknowledged that “we have seen the timelines for implementation extended, both in Hudaydah, and the prisoner exchange agreement. Such changes in timelines are expected. The initial timelines were rather ambitious. We are dealing with a complex situation on the ground.”He “categorically rejected” a call from the Saudi-led coalition which is backing Yemeni Government to declare the ceasefire over or apportion blame to one party, for attempting to nullify the hard-won Stockholm agreement.“We are planning to convene the next round of political consultations soon,” he told the newspaper. “As I mentioned, we do not want to lose the momentum created in Sweden. However, we all are on the same page that we need to see progress in implementing what was agreed in Sweden before convening the next round of consultations. We hope we will be able to announce the date of the next round of consultations very soon.”“There is a window of opportunity that was opened for Yemen in Sweden, and it is important to seize this opportunity, and to capitalize on the momentum we have seen during and after Sweden”, he said. read more

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Despite progress in childbirth safety one woman or baby dies every 11

In a joint appeal for all nations to do more to provide better medical care for all, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) outlined several ways to help protect the 2.8 million pregnant women and newborns who die every year.A skilled pair of hands to help mothers and newborns around the time of birth, along with clean water, adequate nutrition, basic medicines and vaccines, can make the difference between life and death. #EveryChildALIVE https://t.co/H3cKi5QgFz— Henrietta H. Fore (@unicefchief) September 19, 2019 UN Inter-agency Group for Child/Maternal Mortality Estimation (IGME)Under-five mortality rate (deaths per 1,000 live births) by country, 2018.$200 billion needed to achieve healthcare targets Some $200 billion a year is needed to achieve all the primary health goals that are required for quality universal health coverage for all, according to Dr Peter Salama, Executive Director in charge of Universal Healthcare targets at WHO.Welcoming the many positive changes in tackling child and maternal mortality globally since 2000, Dr Salama insisted that many countries were in a position to achieve much more, without having to find new funding.“The biggest difference in terms of when we discuss financing between the MDG (Millennium Development Goals) era (2000-2015) and the SDG era, is the real acknowledgement that the money is there for many countries, they just have to spend it on the right things,” he said.“So we’re not turning to the donor community and saying, ‘Give us $200 billion.’ We’re turning to middle-income and higher-income and even some lower-income countries that are stable and saying, ‘Actually, if you choose the right things, you could meet these goals within your current budgets.’”‘Staggering success’ in reducing deathsSince 2000, Dr. Salama insisted, the overall story of maternal and child mortality had been “a staggering success that we don’t often see in global and health development”.He pointed to a 50 per cent reduction in deaths in children under 15 years old – from 14.2 million in 2000 to 6.2 million deaths in 2018 – and a 35 per cent reduction in maternal deaths over the same period. Their recommendations tackle immediate and underlying problems, such as ensuring that midwives have water to wash their hands and helping teenage girls to stay in school longer, where there is less chance of them getting pregnant.In addition, communities should have access to cheap medicines, such as oral rehydration salts used to treat diarrhoea, and “ten cent vaccines” to keep tuberculosis at bay, the UN agencies insisted.Citing 2018 data showing that newborns – babies in their first month – accounted for around half of the 5.3 million deaths among under-fives, WHO and UNICEF also highlighted the need for other structural changes.These include ensuring that pregnant mothers eat a sufficiently nutritious diet to stave off illnesses linked to malnutrition.Sub-Saharan babies, 10 times more likely to die All of these things “can make the difference between life and death”, said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore, in a statement accompanying new data showing that in sub-Saharan Africa, women in childbirth are nearly 50 times more likely to die, than in richer regions, and their babies are 10 times more likely to perish in their first month.According to 2018 figures, one in 13 children in sub-Saharan Africa also died before their fifth birthday, which is 15 times more than in Europe, where the rate is one in 196.Beyond sub-Saharan Africa, the joint WHO/UNICEF report also expressed concern about high mother and baby mortality rates linked to poverty in Southern Asia.Taken together, both regions account for around eight in 10 of all maternal and child deaths, highlighting vast inequalities in healthcare worldwide.Going to Sweden ‘can reduce mother’s chances of dying by 100’“If I look to my own native country, Sweden (a woman) who travels from the highest mortality regions to the world to Sweden, she reduces her overall mortality rate by 100”, UNICEF’s Chief of Health, Dr Stefan Peterson, told journalists in Geneva.Under global healthcare targets agreed by the international community in 2015 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 2030 Agenda, Goal 3.2 calls for fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030. “The world will fall short of this target by more than one million lives if the current pace of progress continues”, the agencies warned.Another SDG target (3.2) urges countries to reduce deaths of babies in their first month of life, to at least 12 per 1,000 live births, and to bring down mortality among under-fives, to at least 25 per 1,000 live births. In 2018, 121 countries had already achieved this under-five mortality rate, according to WHO, while among the remaining 74 States, 53 will need to accelerate progress to reach the SDG target on child survival by 2030. read more

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UK car production continues to climb

December CV output up 27.1 per cent on December 2002 For the whole of 2003 it was down, just 1.3 per cent on 2002 For further tables, analysis and information, please click on the link below.DownloadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) UK car output rose 1.7 per cent to 1,657,558 million units in 2003 Production for export reaches record 69.2 per cent output share December’s output leaps 15.4 per cent boosting year-end total Commenting on car production last year, SMMT chief executive Christopher Macgowan said, ‘The UK is a major player in global car production and today’s figures confirm that. With nine key manufacturers and a strong specialist sports car industry, Britain boasts a wider production base than any other European country. This continued growth is therefore particularly encouraging against a backdrop of falling output across continental Europe.’ Best December production volume since 1997Provisional output data released today by the Office for National Statistics show that: Production figures released today by the Office for National Statistics/SMMT show: read more

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Transport News Brief – Monday 18 February 2008

Transport News Brief Week eight, Monday 18 February 2008 January boost for van and truck registrations UK van and truck registration figures recently published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders show a strong start to the year, with rolling 12-month van registrations at 338,351 and trucks at 52,573 units. These put vans up 2.7% for January and 3.3% for the rolling year, while trucks are up 51.3% for the month, with artic registrations rising 137.7%. “We’ve seen a strong start to the year, with truck registrations back to expected volumes,” said Paul Everitt, chief executive at the SMMT. “January’s figures are encouraging, it’s early days, but by the end of the year we may well have a total that beats the year-end average for each of the last 10 years.” More from Robin Dickeson on +44 (0)2 073 449 222 or rdickeson@smmt.co.uk Victory for Euro 5 deal Transport for London has agreed £2.00 congestion charge discounts for Euro 5 trucks. Starting from 27 October Euro 5 trucks will pay £6.00 a day rather than the £8.00 charge for older trucks. The deal lasts till 1 October 2010. At the same time, TfL says it will extend the 100% discounts for LPG and CNG powered trucks till January 2010. Euro 5 vans get a deal too, but lasting till January 2012. The SMMT, FTA and other people who’ve been lobbying for this have all welcomed the move. “Clearly incentives for the cleanest and latest technology make sense – they bring wider benefits than just better emissions; better brakes, less noise and greater safety, for instance,” said Robin Dickeson, manager, commercial vehicle affairs for the SMMT. More from Robin Dickeson on +44 (0)2 073 449 222 or rdickeson@smmt.co.uk Hybrid truck trial for Deutsche Post Mercedes-Benz says it handed the first two hybrid trucks to the Deutsche Post Group, which it says is the first logistics company in Europe to trial hybrid trucks in its operations. The trucks involved are an Atego BlueTec Hybrid and Fuso Canter Eco Hybrid. The trial will initially include DHL Express operations in the UK as well as mail transport in Germany, with more Daimler hybrids to join the DHL fleet later. At the same time, Mercedes says the use of AdBlue in some 100,000 of its Euro 4 and 5 trucks so far has already saved 700,000 tonnes of CO2 More from Ian Norwell on +44 (0)1 908 245 949 or ian.norwell@daimlerchrysler.co.uk CV Show to be ‘an even bigger success’ Last week 4,910 people registered on the CV Show website www.cvshow.com for fast track passes for the Show. They will each get an advance copy of the CV Show Guide some three weeks before the event’s doors open, together with their ticket. “We’ve more people registering than we had this time last year,” said Claire Balch, CV Show co-ordinator, “which bodes well for attendance”. Previously the demand for Show Guides was enormous and we ran out by the morning of the third day, so it looks as though people are thinking ahead and making sure of their copies as soon as possible. The message is register soon if you haven’t already done so.” The organisers also say they’ve already successfully sold 99.5% of the available stand space, with two months to go before the Show opens. “This is great news because once again the CV Show will be an even bigger success this year than it was the last time”, said Claire,” it has grown more successful every year for the last nine years.” More from Claire Balch on +44 (0)1634 261262 or sales@cvshow.com Departmental delusion At a recent meeting on Whole Vehicle Type Approval, most of the people the Department for Transport invited from trade associations and industry bodies said that the DfT is deluding itself over the now infamous Type Approval By-pass. Once Whole Vehicle Type Approval starts, unscrupulous bodybuilders will be able to avoid the system and its costs by simply registering a van and then converting it, typically to a minibus. “That way, the bodybuilder avoids any safety checks and can undermine the entire system,” said Robin Dickeson, manager, commercial vehicle affairs for the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders. The SMMT has been warning the DfT since last summer, but thinks the civil servants are deliberately ducking the issue and deluding themselves that “people wouldn’t do that” The SMMT’s own van maker members say that already some 40% of the nation’s estimated 10,000 minibus and crew-bus conversions follow the ‘by-pass’. “Unless the DfT wakes up and does something, it will create a system that penalises responsible firms while letting cowboys skimp and undercut them with potentially lethal vehicles. Ironically, this is the DfT’s take on legislation that is supposed to level the commercial playing field.” More from Robin Dickeson on +44 (0)2 073 449 222 or rdickeson@smmt.co.uk Collease takes its first new Stralis Norwich-based Collease Truck & Trailer Rentals is the first contract hire and rental fleet in the UK to take the new Iveco Stralis heavy truck model. The initial order comprises 37 Stralis Active Space 6×2 twin-steer tractor units with mid-lift axles. A further 100 new Stralis tractors are due for delivery before the end of June 2008. The deal, won by Iveco distributor Norfolk Trucks, follows the delivery of 23 of the previous model Stralis AS tractors last August. Collease will use its new trucks across a range of contract hire and long term rental agreements. More from James Keeler on +44 (0)2 083 991 184 or jk@garnett-keeler.com New Actros gets PowerShift transmission as standard Mercedes says that as part of a package of ‘comfort, safety and economy’ changes, the new Actros truck model will get the PowerShift transmission as standard. The firm also says this is a first in the market in which the Actros competes. Mercedes has sold 550,000 Actros trucks in over 100 countries since its launch in 1996. More from Ian Norwell on +44 (0)1 908 245 949 or ian.norwell@daimlerchrysler.co.uk Truckers meet the Chancellor People from the Freight Transport Association and the Road Haulage Association met Alistair Darling, Chancellor of the Exchequer recently to plead for the Government to scrap its plans to hike fuel duty by a further two pence a litre from 1 April. The FTA and RHA, which together represent operators of over 300,000 UK trucks, wrote a joint letter to the Daily Telegraph, with 11 major groups representing industry and motorists. This said that at 50.35 pence a litre, UK fuel duty for diesel and petrol is already the highest in Europe, double the EU average and that the increase will cause ‘further serious difficulties’ for the transport and forecourt industries. More from Kate Gibbs on +44 (0)1 932 838 917 or kate.gibbs@rha.net Scrap Dartford tolls says FTA The Freight Transport Association is angry that discounts for using the Dartford crossing are to be restricted to local residents and that the facility is not to be extended to local businesses. The FTA says that local industry, as daily users of the facility and providing employment and a contribution to the local economy, should also enjoy free transit. “We have always said that, since the construction of the crossing has long since been paid for, tolls at Dartford should be totally scrapped,” said Geoff Dossetter, director of external affairs for the FTA. For industry and motorists they are costly and inconvenient and the process of slowing traffic to collect a toll is very bad for air quality.” He says the discount scheme for local residents is good news and a step in the right direction but wants it extended to local truckers. “The continuing collection of tolls at Dartford is outdated, unnecessary and unfair and should be stopped.” More from Geoff Dossetter on +44 (0)1 892 552 255 or gdossetter@fta.co.uk MAN merges truck and bus divisions MAN says it has merged its Bus Division with MAN Nutzfahrzeuge, the firm’s truck division. The aim is to more rapidly exploit ‘synergies’ with the Truck Division. Joachim Dürr, previously managing director of the bus subsidiary is now senior vice president for corporate development in the MAN Group, responsible for the strategic development of procurement and IT. Detlef Romberg remains as head of bus sales. More from Dr. Detlef Hug on +49 (0)89 1580 2485 or detlef.hug@man.eu Experts advise MEPs on urban mobility The European Parliament’s Committee on Transport and Tourism has held a public hearing on urban mobility policy. MEPs and invited experts looked at the ways they might use EU policy and technology to cut urban traffic congestion and improve local people’s quality of life. More from www.smmt.co.uk Jochen Hahn to race for MAN MAN says Jochen Hahn will drive a 1,000hp racing TGS truck for the firm in this season’s truck racing championship. Hahn finished last season in fourth place, driving a Mercedes. The first round of the FIA controlled championship will be at Barcelona on 10 and 11 April. And on 26 and 27 July the European Truck Racing Championship will return to the UK for the first time in nine years, with an event at Donington, the circuit at which UK truck racing started in 1986. More from Dr. Detlef Hug on +49 (0)89 1580 2485 or detlef.hug@man.eu Further interest rate cuts unlikely Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England has warned that UK growth is likely to be less than 2% by the end of the year. “The near-term outlook is one of inflation rising sharply alongside a marked slowing in growth,” he said. The continuing risk of inflation makes further interest rate cuts unlikely, though King says that the UK is unlikely to see a full-blown recession. More from www.smmt.co.uk ‘Excellent’ results as Paccar records 69 straight years’ profit Paccar says 2007 delivered its second highest revenue and net income in its 102-year history. The firm earned a net profit for 69 consecutive years, according to Mark C. Pigott, chairman and chief executive officer. “Paccar’s excellent financial results” came in a year that saw North American heavy truck sales down 45% on the previous year. For the full-year 2007, consolidated net sales and financial service revenues were $15.22bn versus $16.45bn in 2006. The firm’s return on shareholders’ equity (ROE) was 27.5% in 2007 and total shareholder return was 29.8 percent. In the last ten years, its shareholder return has averaged 22.7% year versus the S&P 500 Index average return of 5.9%. More from Martin Hayes on +44 (0) 2 074 948 050 or mhayes@automotivepr.com VED evasion cost £79m in ’07/08 According to DfT figures released on Thursday, the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency collected an estimated 98.5% of all potential revenue from road tax in 2007. However, the Conservative Party estimates that vehicle excise duty evasion is likely to cost the Treasury around £79m in 2007/08. More from www.smmt.co.uk Motor Transport Awards for 2008 Motor Transport says entries for its 2008 Awards competition are already looking good. There are 17 categories this year, including long-term stalwarts like Fleet Engineer of the Year and Haulier of the Year. There are also some new awards and some old favourites return: the Environment Award, International Operator of the Year, the Innovation Award, Best Use of Technology, and the Low Carbon & Efficiency Award. The deadline for entry is 28 March, but go to www.mtawards.co.uk to see how to enter the Awards, how they are judged and how to book tables at the black tie dinner at the Grosvenor House Hotel on London’s Park Lane on 2 July. Motor Transport will publish an Awards shortlist later this spring and announce the winners at the Awards dinner. “Remember, you’ve got to be in it to win it,” said Justin Stanton, editor. More from Justin Stanton on 02 086 523 500 or justin.stanton@rbi.co.uk Hino and Guangzhou agree a JV Hino Motors, Ltd. and the Guangzhou Automobile Group have agreed to set up a joint venture, called Guangqi Hino Motors Co., Ltd. or Guangqi Hino, in Guangzhou, China. The new firm will build and sell a range of commercial vehicles. More from www.hino.co.jp UK exhibition debut for new TomTom systems TomTom plans the UK exhibition debut for its Work, Webfleet and Go 720 software on its stand 12-319 at the CV Show in April. The firm says the range of software gives truckers 24-hour access to vehicle management and comprehensive reporting tools as well as sophisticated hands free phone and satellite navigation using what the firm says is the best-known and interactive European map range. Working with the firm’s recently launched Link 300, this can give fleet operators minute-by-minute journey information and a wide range of summary reports and data to show their vehicles’ whereabouts and drivers’ activities. More from Chris Wakeley on +44 (0) 2 074 948 050 or cwakeley@automotivepr.com Environmental best practice available online Lloyds TSB Autolease says it has developed an environmental best practice guide to help fleet managers find how to make their fleets greener at the click of a button. The guide will help with practical advice on how to measure, manage and improve the environmental performance of fleets. “Along with greater vehicle choice, online CO2 reporting and environmental consulting, a click of a button at www.lloydstsbautolease.co.uk gives fleet managers access to tips and common-sense advice on how to cut the carbon footprints of their fleets,” says Grahame Negus, head of Lloyds TSB’s specialist commercial vehicle unit. More from Lawrence Hamilton on +44 (0)1 614 477 251 or lawrence.hamilton@lloydstsbautolease.co.uk Isuzu wins orders for new heavies Isuzu says that it is winning orders for its newly announced ‘Forward’ range of 11 to 18 tonners. Keith Child, the firm’s marketing director says he thinks the industry’s ‘extraordinarily long order lead times’ are working in Isuzu’s favour. “We are already taking orders for the new vehicles because we can beat those lead times. To date we have approaching 30 orders ‘in the bag’ and indeed every one of the vehicles to be on our stand, 6-050 at the CV Show is ‘sold’”. He says the stand is the biggest the firm has taken at the CV Show, will display seven trucks and has an “even bigger hospitality area from which we can serve our now famous ‘bangers and mash’ lunch.” More from Keith Child on +44(0)1 920 463 962 or keith.child@isuzutruck.co.uk And finally New Scientist’s Feedback column reports that the instructions supplied with Bryan Carter’s Sonic Plakaway toothbrush include a warning: “Never use while sleeping.” More from www.newscientist.com Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

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SMMT meets Conservatives at party conference

SMMT meets Conservatives at party conferenceSMMT hosted a lunch event at the Conservative party conference in Manchester on 5 October 2009. Conservative MPs, MEPs, London assembly members, and prospective parliamentary candidates met SMMT members to discuss the role of the UK automotive industry in a low carbon economy. Over 50 attendees joined members of the Conservative front bench, including party chairman Eric Pickles MP and shadow transport secretary Theresa Villiers MP to discuss the latest industry issues. The lunch completed a series of successful fringe events at the three main party conferences designed to promote the automotive industry by engaging with key politicians and stakeholders.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Mark Prisk MP, shadow minister for business, gave a keynote speech outlining Conservative business policy in relation to the automotive sector. Mr Prisk welcomed the publication of the New Automotive Innovation and Growth Team (NAIGT) report, noting that the Conservatives wish to form a closer, strategic partnership with the automotive industry to help make the UK a leading exporter of value added manufacturing products. SMMT president Joe Greenwell spoke on behalf of industry, highlighting the difficult year the automotive sector has experienced as well as the much needed boost for the industry through the scrappage scheme. Mr Greenwell explained that it could take until next summer before modest growth returns to the market. He also outlined industry’s full commitment to work in partnership with political decision-makers to deliverthe recommendations laid out by the NAIGT report, ensuring a prosperous future for the UK automotive industry.  read more

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Queens Speech delivers Digital Economy Bill

·         Work with manufacturers so that vehicles sold with a radio are digitally enabled by the end of 2013.·         Support a common logo for digital radios and ensure that non-digital radios and their limitations are clearly labelled.·         Encourage the development of portable digital converters.·         Promote the introduction of more sophisticated traffic information via digital radio and comprehensive marketing by broadcasters.·         Work with European partners to develop a common approach to digital radio. SMMT chief executive Paul Everitt said, “A collaborative approach between broadcasters, vehicle manufacturers and government is essential for the effective delivery of the Digital Britain recommendations and government’s Digital Economy Bill. Broadcasters must now increase the content and coverage of digital radio and work with government to build awareness of its availability. This will help generate consumer demand to justify investment by vehicle manufacturers.”Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Industry does have reservations about the timetable for introduction but is pleased that the Digital Economy Bill provides a certain timetable for industry and other stakeholders to work to. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders has welcomed the Queen’s Speech in which government has committed to the migration of digital radio through the Digital Economy Bill. The Speech, which marks the opening of Parliament, outlines the legislative agenda for the forthcoming year. Government introduced the Digital Britain Report earlier this year which sets out a five-point plan to encourage take-up of digital radio in cars: read more

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The importance of Lean Manufacturing in Advanced Manufacturing

7 OctoberA group of 20 Business Studies students, aged 15-16, will participate in a factory tour looking at how lean tools and techniques are used across the plant to eliminate waste and continuously improve manufacturing processes.The students will then take part in a Kando activity, which is an assessment tool used in the Jaguar Land Rover recruitment process which focusses on lean manufacturing, quality, communication and teamwork. To finish the day, the young people will participate in an exhilarating off-road demonstration on Solihull’s Land Rover Experience course.Our Education Business Partnership Centres run all year round and offer bespoke, innovative, curriculum based sessions in a real business environment. Our support includes programmes for all ages, abilities and qualifications. Please contact us for more information.VenueJaguar Land Rover Solihull Advanced Manufacturing Centre, Lode Lane,West Midlands, B92 8NWOrganiserJane Harman, Education OfficerSolihull Education Business Partnership Centre0121 700 3035Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

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OMalley lecturer gives insights into changing world of marketing

It’s Brock University students like Ashley Howard and Mitchell Cowan who will lead the evolution of the marketing and advertising industry.The two students took first place and won $2,000 in the 16th annual Grant Dobson Case Competition Tuesday afternoon.Terry O’Malley chats with Ashley Howard and Mitchell Cowan, winners of this year’s Grant Dobson Case Competition.Hosted by the Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film, the Grant Dobson Case Competition provides students the opportunity to showcase their superior creativity and presentation skills to a panel of industry experts.The competition was followed by the annual Terry O’Malley Lecture in Marketing and Advertising Tuesday night, where keynote speaker Andrew Bailey, partner and CEO of The&Partnership, North America, said the industry is changing rapidly.Bailey, a Welland native who has gone on to become a Manhattan-based marketing leader, presented on A New Model for a New World – the Agency of the Future at the event held in the in the newly renovated Sean O’Sullivan Theatre.He said industry clients are now seeking interdisciplinary methods to build their brands. Bailey’s lecture explored these changes in modern marketing and how his agency is working to answer the needs of today.Bailey was one of the judges of the Dobson competition, and was joined by former O’Malley lecturer and the Director of Content Creation at Traffik, Greg Plata, as well as Peter Shier, President and Partner at Naked Creative Consultancy, Ania Lindenbergs, Executive Director of Brand Marketing at the University of Toronto and Lynn Fletcher, Partner at Fletcher Weir Consulting.Named after the late Grant Dobson, who served as the Executive Director of the Office of External Relations at Brock University, the competition was implemented to further the objectives set by O’Malley as a platform within the Lecture in Marketing and Advertising to deliver opportunities for students to learn about and implement the current strategies of marketing, advertising and the mass media.This fall, students were challenged to create a unique marketing campaign for the travel accommodation site, Airbnb, Inc. and pitch their campaigns to the panel of judges. The campaign was to be targeted at Canadian Millennials between the ages of 18-24 with an objective of increasing the number of Airbnb profiles and site activity.First place winners, Howard and Cowan, presented a compelling and unique campaign that took advantage Parks Canada’s campaign to waive entrance fees to all national parks in 2017. With their clear implementation and research into millennial consumer behaviour, Howard and Cowan took home the grand prize of $2,000. Howard also received the Mark Smyka Best Presenter Award.“The Grant Dobson Case Competition has helped me expand my marketing portfolio even more,” said Howard.In second place were students Rebecca Gauvin, Celine Da Costa, Madison Johnston, Sydney Locche receiving the $1,200 prize, followed by students Bliss Gatenby, Sierra Dietz and Marisa Whitecross receiving the $800 prize.“This event is so worthwhile because we get real life experience,” said Rebecca Gauvin, a third-year Business Communications student and finalist.According to O’Malley, world-renowned and award-wining marketing icon and Niagara native, the Case Competition does more than allow students to exercise their creativity.“We want to expose the students to two elements: highly successful contemporary professionals currently making news in their fields; and, with the Dobson Case Competition, put them in front of respected and proven professionals,” says O’Malley. “The students will see the real world and hopefully be inspired to realize they, too, can achieve beyond their Brock days.”According to O’Malley, “some of the most recognized individuals in the communications world have been part of this day helping to put Brock on a much larger plateau. It’s our hope our students take advantage of this opportunity.”View more photos from the event on the Faculty of Social Sciences’ Facebook Page at facebook.com/brockufoss.Student finalists of the 16th Annual Grant Dobson Case Competition in Marketing and Advertising. read more

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Brock grad to cook up storm on MasterChef Canada

The Brock community may recognize a familiar face when tuning into the Season 5 premiere of MasterChef Canada next week.Alumnus Michael Griffiths (BSc ’16, BEd ’16) has used his culinary prowess to secure a spot as one of 21 finalists in the televised national cooking competition, which kicks off Tuesday, April 3 on CTV.While Griffiths’ focus was on Mathematics and Concurrent Education during his time at Brock, the 24-year-old Richmond Hill native has always had a passion for food.Brock alumnus Michael Griffiths was chosen to compete among 21 home cooks in the MasterChef Canada finals.As a child, he was frequently found in the kitchen helping his mother prepare the family’s meals, and later on in his university years, he often impressed his roommates with his culinary skills.It was during his time on campus that Griffiths learned to balance the many interests — math and food among them — that contended for his time.“I was always very engaged. I played rugby, worked as a senior supervisor at the recreation services desk and worked with a number of mathematics and outreach programs,” he said. “Brock was the kickstarter for a lot of my different adventures.”With a wide variety of interests still on his plate, Griffiths decided to pursue his dream of being on MasterChef, all while simultaneously working to earn his Master of Mathematics at the University of Guelph.At first glance, there may seem to be little overlap between mathematics and culinary arts, but Griffiths said that is not the case.He believes his math background gives him an edge in the kitchen.“I know how to think critically. I know how to think logistically,” he said. “If I’m having a party for 50 people, I know how to work out what I need to do in order to put forward an amazing dish that everyone can enjoy.”Griffiths knew the timing was right to attempt to claim the coveted MasterChef Canada title.“With the support of friends and family, I took the leap,” he said.He applied for the show online last summer, submitting a video of himself whipping up a dinner party for a group of close friends and talking about the role his family has played in his love affair with food.He then attended an open audition in Toronto, presenting a homemade sausage dish that impressed a judging panel made up of local chefs and sent him on to the next round.Sworn to secrecy until details of his MasterChef Canada journey are revealed on air, Griffiths was unable to say much about his on-screen experience, but did reflect on the surreal feeling of stepping onto set for the first time.MasterChef Canada judges, from left, Michael Bonacini, Alvin Leung and Claudio April. (Photo: CTV)“As one of the final 21 home cooks, you walk into the MasterChef kitchen and that’s when you get to meet the judges for the first time,” Griffiths said of his encounter with renowned chefs Michael Bonacini, Alvin Leung and Claudio Aprile.“That’s when I felt like a 12-year-old boy. I was in my element, in my dream. Then we were given a schedule to prepare our meals for the judges.”Griffiths urged the Brock community to “stay tuned” for what comes next.“I really hope you like what you see.”He is thankful for the encouragement he has received from the Brock community, which has “hit home in such an incredible way.”“This is another example of the outstanding support the Brock community has always provided for me.”Griffiths hopes to inspire his fellow Badgers to continue to work hard and follow their passions, even if it takes them down an unconventional path.“Follow your heart and realize that what you’re working hard on may not be your end goal passion, but I guarantee there’s a connection to your future there,” he said.MasterChef Canada premieres Tuesday, April 3 at 9 p.m. on CTV. read more

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Registration open for digital pedagogy conference

Educators from across North America will be on campus next month to learn more about weaving technology into teaching.Registration is now open for the fifth annual Digital Pedagogy Institute Conference, to be held at Brock Aug. 9 and 10.The two-day conference includes presentations, workshops and digital tool training that focuses on innovative uses of digital technology to enhance and transform undergraduate and graduate teaching in the humanities and social sciences.Topics explored during the conference include best practices, case studies, the state of digital pedagogy in higher education and digital pedagogy collaborations between faculty, educational developers, librarians and students.“Hosting for the second year, Brock is proud to be able to bring together international educators and practitioners to share their knowledge and experience with technology in higher education,” says conference co-ordinator Justin Howe from Brock’s Centre for Digital Humanities.“Being able to bring together people from diverse fields with a common focus of interest and interesting applications has proven a very rewarding opportunity for the Centre for Digital Humanities, building new partnerships and collaborations for institution and participants alike.”Nearly 100 educators from across North America are expected to attend this year’s conference, which will feature 30 presenters on a wide variety of digital pedagogy topics.The conference also features three keynote speakers. They include:Claire Battershill, a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at Simon Fraser University, is an author and co-creator of a number of digital pedagogy resources. She will be speaking about digital resource development and collaborative pedagogy.Jennifer Jenson, the Director of the Institute for Research on Digital Learning and a professor at York University, is an internationally-recognized scholar on digital games and gender as well as technology and education. Her talk will explore pedagogy through the animated series South Park.Ray Siemens is a Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Victoria and directs the Digital Humanities Summer Institute and the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab. His keynote talk will be “Making Open Social Scholarship Work.”The conference program and registration information are available on the Faculty of Humanities website. Deadline for registration is Aug. 6.The annual conference is a partnership between Brock University, the University of Guelph, the University of Toronto Scarborough and the University of Waterloo.Brock’s organizing committee includes the Centre for Digital Humanities, the Centre for Pedagogical Innovation and the James A. Gibson Library. read more

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