United Nations authority addresses refugee crises

first_imgIn his Monday address, “The Responsibility to Solve,” United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) T. Alexander Aleinikoff said the international community must go beyond basic protection and assume responsibility for finding long-term solutions to major refugee crises.  “The way we think about international protection [of refugees] is that it should be a bridge to a solution, not the ending of the effort made by the international community,” Aleinikoff said. The UNHCR is most concerned with protracted refugee situations, in which 25,000 or more people of one nationality have been exiled from their home country for at least five years, Aleinikoff said. Aleinikoff said there are 29 of these situations around the world today. “In east Sudan that borders Ethiopia and Eritrea, there are between 50,000 and 100,000 refugees, some of whom have been there for 40 years,” he said. “Sixty percent of the population there has been born [to refugee parents].”  Aleinikoff said the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, the largest of its kind, also has an unfortunate amount of long-term residents. “The saddest fact that I have learned in the time I’ve been at UNHCR comes out of Dadaab,” he said. “There are now 10,000 children in Dadaab who were born to refugees, who were born in Dadaab. That cannot be the way the world ought to face and think about refugee situations.”  Although refugee camps are meant to be temporary remedies, Aleinikoff said the UNHCR seeks three types of “durable solutions” for refugees: returning them to their countries of origin, resettlement in a third country or local integration into the country in which they have been granted asylum.  “The cause of protracted refugee situations … is because the usual solutions don’t work,” he said.  Aleinikoff said the international community must focus more on getting refugees out of camps and giving them roots. “There is a bias in the way American refugee scholars … have thought about refugee protection, that if we just get people safe and don’t return them to persecution, that’s enough,” he said. “[But] the end of the refugee problem is people being re-attached to a community. That’s the initial harm they suffered in being refugees.” Without this re-attachment, Aleinikoff said the effects on refugees are “calamitous.” Refugees lack adequate health care and proper education, face physical safety risks and suffer grave psychological effects, he said. But Aleinikoff said even though countries should be concerned about upholding refugees’ human rights, talk of individual rights does not motivate nations to step in and fix the problem. “What I would suggest here is to find a rhetoric, or a moral fulcrum that moves the international community into action,” he said. Aleinikoff said this “moral fulcrum” would be a responsibility among all countries to share the burden of refugee crises. “A principle implicit in the refugee regime is one of international burden-sharing,” he said. “I’m suggesting a principle that members of the international community owe the other members of the international community.” Aleinikoff said currently developed countries have an upper hand over undeveloped nations when it comes to handling refugee crises. “Most refugees end up in developing countries paid for by developed countries,” he said. “In some ways, that’s the bargain, and it’s not always a happy bargain because sometimes developed countries use those kinds of funds as a way to keep refugees out of developed countries.” More progress can be made in combating refugee crises if countries work together to provide long-term solutions for refugees based on a shared responsibility, Aleinikoff said. “If we go into thinking now that there is a responsibility to solve these situations, lots of things become possible and lots of things get on the table,” he said. “We discover that people remain refugees not because they have to but because there isn’t the political will to not let them be refugees anymore.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s names three valedictorians

first_imgEditor’s note: A version of the story appeared online March 18.Saint Mary’s announced the names of three students who will represent the Class of 2016 as valedictorians during the College’s 169th Commencement.The three honorees are Paige Aldrich, Annie Cavalier and Alex Vizard. Aldrich is a chemistry and mathematics double major, Cavalier is a chemistry major with a concentration in biochemistry and a minor in biology and Vizard is an accounting major with a concentration in finance and a minor in mathematics.Susan Zhu After graduation, Aldrich said she plans to study nuclear chemistry at Michigan State University’s graduate program. Vizard said she will be working at Ernst & Young in Chicago, while Cavalier will attend medical school at Loyola University in Chicago.Vizard said she was surprised when she found out she was one of three valedictorians.“I never thought there would be three,” she said. “I thought there would be some sort of tie-breaker. I never really thought about getting it. It wasn’t an explicit goal, but I was very excited and proud to be able to represent my class.”Cavalier said during her college search, she initially did not have Saint Mary’s on her radar because her mother graduated from the College in 1988. She said she wanted to go somewhere that felt more like a place of her own, but then she came to the College to visit.“When I came to visit, I was walking through the buildings and talking to professors and students,” Cavalier said. “It just felt like the right fit.”Aldrich said Saint Mary’s has helped make her accountable for her own life.“I’ve learned a lot about the world around me and realized that I need to match what I believe with my actions,” she said. “When I was a freshman, I learned about factory farms and realized that I needed to become vegan in order to support what I believed to be right. I’ve also struggled with my faith throughout my life, so I took a critical look at my beliefs and have deeply improved my spiritual life.”Cavalier said the close relationships between students and professors make Saint Mary’s special.“It makes the classroom experience so much better,” she said. “You don’t feel like you’re being talked at. That gave me a lot of confidence to speak up in class and share my opinions. … I think that confidence is what I’ve gained in general, but also the ability to be independent and leave here with no doubts of the success that I will see in the future. I don’t doubt my ability to do things that I want to do.”Vizard said the College and the Sophia Program, Saint Mary’s liberal arts curriculum requirements, helped her gain confidence in all areas of her life.“It’s caused me to try a lot of new things,” she said. “I took a lot of classes that I probably would have never tried taking, and I ended up really enjoying them. I think it’s caused me to expand my mindset and grow as a person in general.”Cavalier said she is proud to a Saint Mary’s student because of the College’s larger community.“You can graduate from a state school or another larger private school, and you don’t ever really go back or associate yourself with the school after that,” she said. “I know I will have ties to this school and this area for the rest of my life. I know it is a place I will always come back to, a place that I’m always going to miss.”Aldrich said she is proud to be graduating from a college that produces strong, kind, driven women.“I could have learned information from textbooks,” she said, “but it wouldn’t have compared to the rounded education that I’ve gotten from the caring, intelligent professors at Saint Mary’s.”Tags: Commencement 2016, graduation 2016, SMC valedictorians, valedictorianslast_img read more

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Student organizations continue work while away from campus

first_imgAs the spread of COVID-19 causes massive social and economic disruption, Notre Dame student organization leaders continue to advocate for students to have a voice, support and access to opportunities. Incoming Notre Dame student body president and vice president juniors Rachel Ingal and Sarah Galbenski have been working closely with many members of the administration — including the Division of Student Affairs, the Student Activities Office (SAO) and the University Emergency Committee — to determine how internal operations and transitions will proceed for student government and clubs. Ingal said the priorities of student government have not changed during this time of uncertainty.“During such a rapidly fluctuating time, the focus so far has been on the most vulnerable students and the wellbeing of the Notre Dame family, as it should be,” Ingal said.Members of student government are focusing on a different aspect each week to adapt to the evolving needs of students while adjusting to life away from campus, Galbenski said.“Last week’s focus was health and safety,” she said. “This week’s focus is on academic coursework. Next week or the week after is when extracurriculars are planned to resume.”These extracurriculars are expected to take place using an online format, Galbenski added.Due to the international pandemic, the current session of the student senate and the student constitution have been suspended, according to an announcement on the senate website last Saturday. The official transition of swearing in newly elected student government leaders into office was previously scheduled to take place on April 1. This transition is suspended until a senate meeting can virtually take place. Galbenski said the later transition date does not affect the position appointments.“Fortunately, we were able to hold our interviews for our executive cabinet the week before spring break and make our final deliberations and decisions over spring break,” Galbenski said. “When extracurriculars resume, the senate and the constitution will be unsuspended. We should then be able to have a meeting, if possible.” The incumbent student body president, senior Elizabeth Boyle, and vice president, junior Patrick McGuire, will remain in power until the new elects can officially transition.Ingal said she and Galbenski have been in contact with the administration involving concerns about pass-fail classes, logistics for pro-rates for spring semester room and board charges to student accounts and decisions regarding the Class of 2020.“We haven’t had super in-depth discussions on how grades or transcripts are going to look yet,” Ingal said. “We have been dealing with the most pressing issues of crisis management right now. We have let our contacts know about the pass-fail petition and Elizabeth [Boyle] and Pat [McGuire] have been echoing those concerns as well. The administration has been handling the situation with a lot of empathy and I would imagine they are going to continue to handle it that way.”The Club Coordination Council (CCC) — the Student Union organization that oversees, allocates funding for and represents undergraduate student clubs — is also allowing time for students to adjust before announcing plans on how the spring allocation process will proceed digitally.“Our top priority is for the campus community to be healthy and safe,” incoming CCC president and junior Ricardo Pozas Garza said. “We don’t want to give students another reason to worry while many are still working on finding a safe place to continue their studies.”More details, including a timeline for due dates, on the spring allocation process will be released after the first week of online classes, Pozas Garza said.“Thankfully a lot of the process is already digital,” he said. “The CCC Executive Board is working on developing guidelines for how meetings will be conducted.”Many student clubs and organizations have already informed their members of canceled events originally set to take place after spring break, including a number of Student International Business Council (SIBC) projects, Mock Trial Nationals, Habitat for Humanity builds and the musical production of “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Additionally, clubs such as the Harper Cancer Research Institute Society, the American Medical Women’s Association and the Asian American Association have already begun moving their respective elections online via Google polls and slides.The Nancy Kerrigan visit, SUB concert, and advising process for first years in student government to learn how to plan SAO events were also canceled, senior and Student Union Board (SUB) executive director Eric Kim said.SIBC — the largest student organization on campus, with nearly 1,000 active members — allocates most of its budget to providing students with national and international networking opportunities. Year-round, students research and work on projects to present to partner companies including Microsoft, the “Big Four” accounting firms and Goldman Sachs. Junior and SIBC president David Torgerson said the new off-campus circumstances will not have a huge impact on student projects this semester.“Out of the 60 projects, the majority of them will be continuing virtually,” Torgerson said. “A lot of the budget that would’ve been allocated to travel will be reallocated to future semesters.”Given that one of the primary visions of SIBC is “Peace Through Commerce,” Torgerson and SIBC vice president and junior Jennifer Paul said they remain optimistic about how SIBC is going to continue this vision in light of the crisis. “There’s even more of a call for peace now,” Paul said. “Business is down, but it will be up again. I think it’s important to maintain those relationships and build our networks. If we lose commitment now, it’s going to be that much harder to get it back up in the future.”Amidst the uncertainty, Ingal said Notre Dame students have been committed to support and help each other respond to adversity.“This is a time when we are finding the true strength and resilience of the Notre Dame family,” Ingal said. “It’s something that will continue to grow and hopefully, we just come out stronger on the other end of this.”Tags: CCC, coronavirus, COVID-19, Extracurriculars, Notre Dame Student Government, SIBClast_img read more

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Oral argument set

first_img Oral argument set The Supreme Court has set oral argument for In Re: Amendments to the Florida Small Claims Rules (Two Year Cycle) – Case No. SC05-146 for 8:30 a.m., September 30. Oral argument is subject to cancellation by the court. Check the online docket for further information on this case at http://jweb.flcourts.org/pls/docket/ds_docket_search. Oral argument set July 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img

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Lake Grove Man Charged in Fatal DWI Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Thomas VaughanA Lake Grove man has been arrested for drunken driving after he allegedly struck and killed a pedestrian in Lake Ronkonkoma early Sunday morning, Suffolk County police said.Thomas Vaughan was driving a Chevrolet Trailblazer westbound on Express Drive North when his SUV struck a man who was in the lane of traffic near Carroll Avenue at 2:30 a.m., police said.Gary Kroll, 59, of Lake Ronkonkoma,was pronounced dead at the scene.The 59-year-old suspect was charged with driving while intoxicated. A judge set his bail at $10,000 bond or $5,000 cash. He is due back in court Monday.last_img

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5 Thanksgiving 2016 Events on Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Natalie ColopriscoThanksgiving is a week away and with it comes a mad dash to prepare for the annual flood of family in town for the feast celebrating the arrival of America’s earliest settlers.Sometimes, the meaning of the holiday—to be thankful for what you have—gets lost in the rush to make sure the festivities are perfectly executed. So, here’s one more thing to be thankful for: the Long Islanders that organize these Thanksgiving events designed to make sure nobody forgets what the holiday is all about.What follows is a listing of five Thanksgiving events on Long Island:Thanksgiving Craft WorkshopJoin in creating a beautiful Thanksgiving craft to share with your family during the holiday season. A portion of the class’s fees will go to Island Harvest. Crafttree, 7 Green St., Huntington. craftreeclasses.com $35. 10-11:30 a.m. Nov. 19.2016 Annual Thanksgiving Native American FeastThis celebration held the weekend before Thanksgiving for more than 25 years includes Native American foods, spear throwing, face painting, fire making, pottery making, wigwam and much more, including the museum’s famous popcorn soup! Films about Native American culture will be shown throughout. Activities are appropriate for all ages. Activities are held both indoors and outdoors. Garvies Point Museum, 50 Barry Dr., Glen Cove. garviespointmuseum.com $5 ages 5 and above. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 19, 20.RELATED EVENTS: Thanksgiving 2016 Turkey Trots on Long Island1863 Thanksgiving Holiday CelebrationVisitors to this re-created mid-19th Century village will be able to enjoy the sights and aromas of an old-fashioned Thanksgiving, including decorated pumpkin pies baked in a beehive oven, and turkey roasted over an open fire. In addition, each afternoon, Traditional Fiddle music will be played and children’s stories will be read. Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Rd., Old Bethpage. nassaucountyny.gov/parks $10 adults, $7 kids are 5 to 12, seniors and volunteer firefighters. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 19, 20, 26 and 27.Who Took Tom The Turkey?  Everyone is a suspect in the case of the kidnapping most foul. An annual holiday musical sure to delight to children of all ages. BayWay Arts Center, 265 East Main St., East Islip. broadhollow.org $11. 1 p.m. Nov. 23, 25.Thanksgiving Day-After Beach to Breach HikeMake the most of your holiday weekend. Walk off those Thanksgiving calories while exploring Fire Island’s dynamic shore. Fire Island National Seashore Wilderness Visitor Center, County Road 46, Shirley. nps.gov Free. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Nov. 25.last_img read more

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Police reform ballot measures did well. But activists say that’s just the start

first_imgx – Advertisement – BLAST FROM THE PASTAt Daily Kos on this date in 2018—North Korea continues to expand nuclear program while Trump … well, tweets, mostly:Just in case you were wondering about the progress of Donald Trump’s plan to denuclearize North Korea via an ambitious plan of lurching from incoherent mockery to lavish praise to ramshackle promises based on nothing at all, the answer is that North Korea is continuing to build up its nuclear arsenal and capabilities while ignoring his administration’s demands.A new study notes that known North Korean missile bases, identified via satellite images, continue to be active. North Korea denies the existence of these bases at all; experts remain concerned that Team Trump is so eager to ink a Trump-flattering deal that they will overlook it.“It’s not like these bases have been frozen,” Mr. [Victor] Cha, the leader of the team that studied the images, said in an interview. “Work is continuing. What everybody is worried about is that Trump is going to accept a bad deal — they give us a single test site and dismantle a few other things, and in return they get a peace agreement” that formally ends the Korean War.Cha was on Team Trump’s shortlist for the South Korea ambassadorship post, but was nixed after he criticized administration policies toward North Korea. It is perhaps notable that he’s using the “Everybody is worried” construct to publicly dump on Trump for being stupid enough to sign such a deal. THREE OTHER ARTICLES WORTH READINGBiden Won. Will the Climate? By Claire Elise Thompson. Five leaders point the way forward for a divided nation. How the Left Beat Trump in Michigan. By Ben Burgis. According to centrists, the “blue wave” didn’t materialize because of the Left. That’s nonsense—and in at least one crucial swing state, Joe Biden rode to victory because of the organizing of progressives and leftists. Democrats’ 2024 Problem Is Already Clear, by Ronald Brownstein. Joe Biden succeeded in bridging his party’s past and future coalitions—but the challenges of future elections are daunting.TOP COMMENTS • RESCUED DIARIESQUOTATION“Let us try to see things from their better side:You complain about seeing thorny rose bushes;Me, I rejoice and give thanks to the godsThat thorns have roses.          ~~Alphonse Karr, “Letters written from my garden,” 1853TWEET OF THE DAY- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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£60m City deal falls through

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Four Sampdoria players test positive for new coronavirus

first_imgOn Thursday, the government said it was still examining medical guidelines of the Italian football federation, which are seen as the stumbling block to a resumption of the season.Teams have been allowed to start practicing this week with players training individually and adhering to social distancing protocols. Full team practices are due to begin on May 18, but only if the medical protocol is approved.Five Sampdoria players — Manolo Gabbiadini, Morten Thorsby, Albin Ekdal, Omar Colley and Antonino La Gumina — as well as team doctor Amedeo Baldari had tested positive in March.Italy has recorded more than 215,000 cases of the virus, which has caused over 29,000 deaths in the country.Topics : Four players from Italian side Sampdoria have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, including one for the second time, the Serie club said.”Currently asymptomatic, they have been placed in quarantine and will be constantly monitored as per protocol,” the club said in a statement https://www.sampdoria.it/covid-19-comunicazione-u-c-sampdoria-del-7-maggio-2020.Fiorentina said three players and three staff members tested positive while a day earlier Torino said one player had contracted the new coronavirus.last_img read more

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UPDATED: Governor Wolf Statement on Wounded Pennsylvania State Police Trooper

first_img PSA,  Statement Updated: November 24, 2015, 3:58 PMUpdated: November 24, 2015, 1:48 PMPosted: November 24, 2015, 10:36 AMHarrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf released the following video, speaking about the wounding in the line of duty of Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Patrick Casey in Philadelphia.# # #Harrisburg, PA – Pennsylvania State Police has confirmed that two suspects, including the shooter, have been apprehended and are in police custody. The injured trooper remains in good condition at Hahnemann Hospital. The investigation remains open.The Governor has received updates from Acting PSP Commissioner Tyree Blocker throughout the morning. PSP expects to provide an update to the media outside the hospital in the near future.PennDOT reports that the eastbound and westbound I-76 travel lanes have reopened to traffic but the ramps from I-76 to I-676 remain closed. I-676 East remains closed from I-76 to I-95. The ramp from I-95 South to I-676 West has been reopened but the northbound ramp off I-95 to I-676 West is still closed. Drivers are encouraged to detour around I-676 and use I-95 or another alternative route to get to Center City Philadelphia.Governor Wolf earlier this afternoon spoke with Trooper Patrick Casey of Troop K in Philadelphia by phone while he recovered with his family by his side at Hahnemann Hospital. The Governor thanked Trooper Casey for willingness to serve and put himself in harm’s way. Trooper Casey was in good spirits and spoke with the Governor about the upcoming holiday. The Governor was glad to hear that Trooper Casey believes he will be able to be home with his family for Thanksgiving.# # #Harrisburg, PA – Following a shooting in Philadelphia today that wounded a Pennsylvania State Police Trooper, Governor Wolf released the following statement:“My thoughts and prayers are with the Pennsylvania State Police Trooper shot on Interstate 676 in the line of duty today. I received an update from Acting Commissioner Blocker a short time ago and I am relieved to learn that the Trooper is in stable condition at a hospital in Philadelphia. Our men and women in law enforcement put their lives on the line each day to protect us, and we owe them a debt of gratitude. The shooter was swiftly taken into custody by the Pennsylvania State Police. No further details are available at this time.”# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitter November 24, 2015center_img UPDATED: Governor Wolf Statement on Wounded Pennsylvania State Police Trooperlast_img read more

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