Community Sport Hero Awards coming to Fort St. John

first_imgSport BC is pleased to announce the Community Sport Hero® Awards will travel to the community of Fort St. John for the first time on Wednesday, August 26, 2009. The awards will honour long-standing community volunteers who have made a significant contribution to sport. Nominations are now being accepted through www.communitysporthero.ca until Friday, July 31, 2009.“Volunteers are the lifeblood of the development and delivery of sport in British Columbia,” said Sport BC’s President and CEO, Paul Varian. “These awards are a rare, meaningful opportunity to acknowledge individuals who have made a significant and sustained contribution to sport in their community.”- Advertisement -To be eligible, nominees for the Community Sport Hero® Awards must meet the following criteria: • Be an individual from the local community who makes a voluntary contribution to sport through coaching, officiating, boards, administration, special events, etc; • Be an individual (not an organization or foundation); and• Has been, or continues to be, a dedicated sport volunteer for a minimum of eight years.Nominations can be made at online at www.communitysporthero.ca until Friday, July 31, 2009.last_img read more

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Region 10 riverine communities affected by major water pollution – officials

first_imgSeveral riverine communities in Region 10 are affected by major pollution of creeks and rivers as a result of gold mining activities.This was revealed by officials of Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice) at a recent statutory meeting of the Regional Democratic Council (RDC).A dredge operating at Great Falls, Demerara RiverSome of the affected areas are Riversview, Falmouth and Rockstone.While the community of Riversview, also situated on the right bank of the Essequibo River, is presently in the spotlight for making history as the first in the region to be designated “Indigenous Heritage Village”, it is said to be battling issues such as water pollution caused by mining activities. Regional Executive Officer (REO) Orrin Gordon, during the meeting pointed to pollution in both the creeks and river.“There’s major, major…pollution in the creeks that they use…from mining,” he told the Council.The RDC has, in recent times, halted diamond mining activities in the Demerara River by suspending the activities of draggers.Regional Chairman Renis Morian said the activities have serious consequences on the health and livelihood of the people living in communities along the Demerara and Berbice Rivers as many depend on the water for household purposes.Morian stated during the meeting that he has had recent reports of yet another dragger being built and taken to the riverine and creek locations.“The environment is under tremendous pressure…and everybody just after one thing- money…at the expense of the very life that they’re living”, he said.The Regional Chairman added that draggers are usually built and hidden in areas such as creeks, as he pointed out that this is dangerous owing to the fact that these areas are where farming takes place and residents utilise the water for drinking purposes.The issue, he explained, has been ongoing for over two decades. The Regional Chairman noted, however, that the Council will continue to fight to protect the well-being of residents living in these communities.“This Council will put up a strenuous battle on behalf of the people at Riverview, Falmouth and Rockstone, as it relates to possible water that they are using that are contaminated. We wouldn’t take it lightly…we’re standing for the people…the residents in this community, we are united against people polluting anything…” he said.He stressed that while operators of the draggers come with legal documents supporting the activities, as Chairman, he has a responsibility to protect the lives of the people.“We got to protect the generations here…people grabbing after gold and forget the livelihood of the people… you work out the cost of the gold and the damage to humanity and the environment and all of that and you will see how the damage to the environment and the people outweigh the lil gold,” Morian stressed.The Regional Chairman pointed out that life has returned to the Demerara river as is evident by an increase in fishing activities, hence the need to protect and preserve the life of the river.“Sometimes I wonder the role that the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) plays in all of this because while you going and get some money, the long-term effects on life and production, on the health of the community far outweigh the benefits…” he noted, as he stressed the importance of protecting life and sustainable living in the communities.Following the halt of the setting up of a mining operation at a section of the Demerara River in Linden last year, several officials had voiced concerns over the negative impacts that such activities have had on communities and what they fear might take place should this practice continue. Divisional Manager of the Guyana Water Inc (GWI) Rawle Friday had explained that should there be any water mining mishaps, some 18,000 residents who depend on the water system can be adversely affected. Friday said the GWI would have taken interest in the operations given the risks of contamination.Deputy Mayor Wainewright Bethune had also pointed to effects such as high mercury concentration which he noted can affect Indigenous communities which solely depend on the river for a livelihood. He noted that these activities should always be associated with an Environment Impact Assessment so that the leadership and the residents of the communities are fully aware of what is happening.last_img read more

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Loyola is up for the task

first_imgThe only other local teams earning top-four seeds were Tri-Valley League champion Oaks Christian of Westlake Village at No. 4 in Div. V and Liberty League champion Viewpoint of Calabasas at No.4 in Div. VI. Loyola advanced the furthest of any area team last season, losing in the Div. II semifinals. The Cubs faced Thousand Oaks in the final the previous two years and could run into the Lancers in the postseason again, as they have also moved to Div. I. The leading threats in Div. I are from the Moore League. Millikan of Long Beach went undefeated during the regular season, but had to settle for the division’s No. 2 seed behind league rival Long Beach Wilson, which tied the Rams twice. Sunset League champion LosAlamitos rounds out the division’s top four seeds. Mission League boys’ soccer teams have had their share of success while competing in the Southern Section playoffs’ lower divisions. St. Francis of La Canada Flintridge won championships in divisions II, III and IV. Loyola of Los Angeles reached the Div. II final two of the past three years, sharing the title in 2005. Continuing the trend will require the biggest challenge yet for the Mission schools, which this season jumped to Div.I, where they will compete among much larger schools for a spot in the March 3 final. So far, the league doesn’t appear to be hindered by the move as league champion Loyola was the area’s highest seed in playoff pairings released Monday. The Cubs (21-6-3) are seeded No. 4 and open Saturday at home against the winner of Wednesday’s wild-card game between Westlake and Cabrillo of Long Beach. center_img Other contenders include Royal of Simi Valley (21-2-4), which is coming off an undefeated run through the Marmonte League, extending its undefeated streak to 22 games. The Highlanders are ranked seventh in the division’s final top-10 poll. St. Francis (24-4-0), second among the four Mission teams to qualify for the postseason, won two tournament championships and has spent much of the season ranked in the division’s top 10. The Golden Knights’ only league losses were to Loyola. Loyola thrives on a defense that has posted 18 shutouts, including nine in its past 10games. The Cubs haven’t allowed more than one goal in a game since losing to City Section power Canoga Park, currently ranked No. 3 in the nation, in the final of the West Coast Classic in December. heather.gripp@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Higuain poised to end AC loan and complete Chelsea move

first_img0Shares0000Argentine forward Gonzalo Higuain had his most successful season under Maurizio Sarri in Napoli. © AFP / Marco BERTORELLOMILAN, Italy, Jan 9 – AC Milan striker Gonzalo Higuain has “agreed terms” and is set for an imminent move to Premier League club Chelsea, Italian sports daily Gazzetta Dello Sport reported on Wednesday.Higuain joined Milan on a season-long loan from Juventus in July with an option to make the deal permanent, but he has struggled to settle at San Siro, scoring eight goals in all competitions. “Chelsea have an agreement with Higuain to take him immediately,” Gazzetta reported.The 31-year-old Argentina international reportedly wants to join his former Napoli coach Maurizio Sarri at the English club, who would take over Milan’s option to eventually make the deal permanent.Milan paid 18 million euros ($20.75 million) to sign him on loan, with a clause to make the deal permanent for a further 36 million euros.Higuain had his most successful season under Sarri, breaking the Serie A goalscoring record with 36 goals in the 2015/16 campaign.He scored 91 goals during his three years at the club before moving to Juventus in 2016 when the Turin club activated his 90 million-euro buyout clause.He scored 40 league goals in two seasons for them, but left for Milan in the last close season after Cristiano Ronaldo’s arrival in Turin.Higuain previously spent six years at Real Madrid after starting his career at River Plate in Argentina.He was hampered by a back injury earlier in the season but broke a two-month goal drought just before the winter break.However, Milan sporting director Leonardo warned on Tuesday he had to get down to work.“He had a tough moment, he has to put it behind him and get to work,” said Leonardo.“A goal can change things, but if he is to continue here, he needs to take on responsibility.”Brazilian Leonardo added: “There’s no point following rumours and gossip.“He is here right now. Seeing as he is here, he needs to get down and actually do something for this team.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Commuters disrupted at Belfast International Airport following Incident on Runway

first_imgCommuters and passengers from Donegal planning to use Belfast International Airport face delays and cancellations following an incident on the runway.It is reported that a freighter aircraft broke down due to burst tyres, leading to significant disruption as recovery vehicles attended the scene.All early arrivals and departures were suspended for the operation. Departures have since resumed, and there are reports of long queues as airlines attempt to rebook travellers on later flights. This morning’s early departures to Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool and London Luton were cancelled. All arrivals were suspended for some time, but a number of landings have now taken place.Passengers planning to use the airport this morning are advised to check with their airlines.Commuters disrupted at Belfast International Airport following Incident on Runway was last modified: October 4th, 2016 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Top Inishowen artists come together for fundraising concert

first_imgDonegal musicians are hosting a night of local music and kindness on September 29th in Carndonagh to raise funds for victims of last month’s flooding.This concert is taking place to help raise further vital funds needed to support local victims of the recent floods in Inishowen. It will feature The Henry Girls, Sailor Bill, Inishowen Gospel Choir, Great White Lies and Tommy Conway of Full Tilt. The event will take place upstairs in Simpsons Bar/Tul Na Rí, Carndonagh. The floods caused severe devastation for families, businesses, infrastructure etc. in the area and it has had a massive effect on the wider Donegal community at home and family and friends abroad.All proceeds from the event will go directly to the Irish Red Cross which will continue to bring much needed relief to anyone that needs it in the local area.Admission is 15 Euro and tickets will be made available through local outlets in the Inishowen area later this week (check event page here for updated list).It is hoped the event will bring the local community in Carndonagh together after these hard times. Tickets are available now on www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/inishowens-own…. Top Inishowen artists come together for fundraising concert was last modified: September 5th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Will 49ers franchise tag of Robbie Gould thwart Bears pursuit?

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — Robbie Gould is back — with the 49ers, not the Chicago Bears.By placing the franchise tag on Gould on Tuesday, the 49ers made sure he won’t escape in free agency next month, squashing a potential reunion with the kicker-needy Bears.Gould’s near-perfect accuracy the past two seasons with the 49ers made him a no-brainer to retain. The franchise tag will command him a $5 million salary this year, assuming …

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Concretions Can Form Rapidly

first_img(Visited 859 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The spherical inclusions inside geological layers do not take millions of years to form, Japanese scientists say.Concretions are eye-catching. Varying in size from peas to cannonballs, the almost perfectly spherical balls that erode out of geological layers seem almost too perfect to be natural. Science Daily indicates that scientists, not only laypersons, are mystified by them, especially when the remains of living things are found inside.All over the world, spectacular fossils have frequently been found preserved inside solid, roughly spherical rocks called “concretions.” From geologists to casual observers, many have wondered why these hardened masses of carbonate formed around dead organisms, with round shapes and sharp boundaries with the surrounding material, typically in marine mud and mudstone.Several important questions regarding concretions have long puzzled scientists. What conditions cause them to form? How long do they take to grow? Why do they stop growing? Why are they so distinct from the surrounding rock or sediments?Japanese researchers, publishing in Nature Scientific Reports, think that geologists need to radically reduce their dating of these rock balls.The results of this new study dramatically impact understanding of the rate at which concretions form. “Until now, the formation of spherical carbonate concretions was thought to take hundreds of thousands to millions of years,” co-author Koshi Yamamoto says. “However, our results show that concretions grow at a very fast rate over several months to several years.” This rapid sealing mechanism could explain why some concretions contain well-preserved fossils of soft tissues that are rarely fossilized under other conditions.“Blueberries” – concretions on Mars (natural) next to rover drill holes (designed).The team evaluated concretions in Japan, England and New Zealand. Not all concretions contain fossils; small versions, dubbed “blueberries” by JPL scientists, have been found on Mars. Those are clearly abiotic, composed of hematite, an iron-rich mineral that may have precipitated from water seeping into bedrock. Similar-looking versions, from blueberry size to golf ball size, are found in Navajo sandstone on Earth, sometimes called Moqui marbles. They can be found in various stages emerging from the sandstone, and collecting on the surface. Because they are harder than the sandstone, they really stand out. The concretions studied with fossils, however, provide an explanation for rapid growth and preservation.All of the studied concretions were composed of calcite, with relatively consistent compositions throughout, distinct from the surrounding muddy matrix. Fine-grained, generally clay-rich sediments were found to be important to limit diffusion and permeability, and to slow the migration of solutes. Thus, bicarbonate concentrations would rise high enough at a reaction front to cause rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate, with sharp boundaries from the surrounding mud.Even though the team studied only calcite versions, their model is general enough to be applied worldwide.This new unified model for the creation of spherical concretions, which can be generalized by simple formulas, can be applied to interpret concretions from all over the world. In addition to advancing our knowledge of this important preservation mechanism in the fossil record, this improved understanding of the rapid precipitation of calcite due to the presence of organic material may have practical applications in the field of sealing technology.Concretions from Navajo sandstone accumulating at White Pocket, Arizona (DFC)The new model helps explain why concretions stop growing, too. When the biological source material is used up, the growth stops: “The concretions therefore continue to grow until there is no more carbon of organic origin remaining within the concretion.”Such a radical revision in formation rates, “at least three to four orders of magnitude faster than previously estimated timescales,” is bound to cause a stir among geologists who have assumed that concretions take up to a million years to form.The original paper in Scientific Reports does not address the “blueberry” concretions on Mars. Presumably other kinds of inclusions can stimulate the growth of spherical structures that can erode from the rock by wind. This might be analogous to stromatolites, which on Earth are considered evidence of fossilized microbial mats. On Mars, however, similar types of structures have been explained by chemical processes. In their concluding sentence, the authors seem to suggest that abiotic conditions can produce concretions as well: “The reported method for estimating the growth rates of concretions is applicable to any syn-genetic concretion within fine marine sediments that formed due to the diffusion-controlled supply of reactants in very early diagenesis.”The article also did not elaborate on soft tissue preserved in concretions, other than providing a reference to a 2015 paper in Palaios from the Society for Sedimentary Geology.Another long-age assumption bites the dust. Think about this! Assumed to take long ages, concretions can form in just months! Secular geologists were off by four orders of magnitude. That’s like going from 10,000 years to 1 year, or from 100,000 years to ten years, or from a million years to 100 years. That’s a ‘YUGE’ mistake!Spherical rocks can also be used as a test of intelligent design. Some spheres are clearly designed: the stone spheres of Costa Rica, cannonballs, and beads in jewelry. Other spectacular spheres can form naturally: concretions (some as big as cannonballs), “cave pearls” and oyster pearls. How do you infer design for a stone sphere made for a Roman catapult, but not for a stone concretion? Do you think we’re going to give you the answer? No; this is your exercise for the day. Test your knowledge of the design filter.last_img read more

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SA marks 24 years since Mandela’s release from prison

first_img11 February 2014 South Africans are today commemorating the 24th anniversary of the release of the late Nelson Mandela from prison. On 2 February 1990, then state president FW de Klerk announced Mandela’s release and the unbanning of the African National Congress (ANC) and other political parties. Mandela spent 27 years in prison before becoming the country’s first democratically elected president. On 11 February 1990, Mandela left Victor Verster Prison in Cape Town a free man, and on that day he addressed thousands of people gathered outside Cape Town’s City Hall. Accompanied by his then wife Winnie, Mandela was enthusiastically received by the throngs who came to see him. Mandela spent 18 years on Robben Island and a short period at Pollsmoor Prison before spending the last 14 months of his imprisonment at the Victor Verster Prison, now known as the Drakenstein Correctional Centre. In June 1964, Madiba and other political activists were sentenced to life in prison. On his release, Mandela was elected president of the ANC. He died at the age of 95 on 5 December 2013. Ninety-one heads of state attended Madiba’s funeral, with 4 500 journalists from all over the world covering the event. A national 10-day period of mourning was observed, with unprecedented media coverage of the life and times of the liberation icon. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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A winter walk in the woods

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest To many from the rural way of life, time spent in the woods is often for clearing brush, fixing fence, or cutting firewood. There is often too little time for simply taking a walk through the woods.That is until you come across a birder. Blake Mathys, assistant professor of environmental sciences at the Ohio Dominican University, recently hosted an Owl Walk at his country home in western Ohio to help to introduce others, including his students, to the unique pastime of birding. Through word of mouth alone, the annual event has grown from just a few to almost 80 this year wanting to catch a glimpse of the unique nocturnal creatures in the fields and forests of the farm.“There’s always something new and different. The fact that they have wings means that you never really know what might show up,” Mathys said. “The rarities and unusual things are something that can be a nice surprise every now and then.”Those involved in the walk gathered near dusk to have supper and enjoy fellowship around a campfire until the dark of night had officially settled in. After a few rules, guidelines, and tips from Mathys, the group began to circle their family property with spotlights shining in every direction with hopes ofBlake Mathys, assistant professor of environmental sciences at the Ohio Dominican University, leads birding groups in search of wildlife in the winter woods.spotting an owl or other creature.With Blake and other more experienced birders heading up the pack, it wasn’t long until the first owl of the night was sighted — an eastern screech owl. The awe and excitement of the large crowd upon seeing the bird clearly showed the pleasure that can be gained from birding.“I think birds are a really good hobby because you can find birds everywhere. They’re pretty much worldwide,” he said. “They’re variable with different birds around at different times of the year because of migration and the breeding season and wintering of the species.”Mathys has his undergrad in biology from Ohio Northern University and his Ph.D. from Rutgers. While at ONU, he became interested in birds and had several related jobs, including work on an endangered species in the Everglades National Park, migrating hawks in Washington, and elephant seal research on an island off of California.He said that owls especially have a certain appeal to people due to their look and the relative mystery that surrounds them.“People like them because they have sort of a wise look to them and big forward facing eyes,” Mathys said. “Being nocturnal and secretive, we sort of know in the back of our mind they’re around, but unless you really go and look for them, you don’t really run into them very often. And so they have that mystique of being a little bit unknown or a little bit difficult to interact with unless you really make an effort.”The Ohio Department of Natural Resources says the Buckeye state boasts an impressive 12 species of owls. This is more than any other bordering state with the exception of Michigan, which has also recorded 12.The Owl Walk, though, is not a game of certainty. Birders rely heavily on their knowledge of the environment, animal calls, and other factors to improve their chances of seeing the birds. But, as with anything wild, a heavy part of the hobby relies upon chance.One owl was seen that night. Walkers were also given the treat of seeing what looked to be two red-shouldered hawks, in their youth, asleep in the trees. Throw in some deer and raccoons in just a short few hours of time, and many of the attendees were convinced of the worth a nighttime walk in the woods has to offer.The stroll showed that anybody armed with a flashlight can become a viewer of the lesser-seen side of wildlife, some of which Mathys says are quite curious.“One of the species that most people don’t really know that’s out there is the flying squirrel. Flying squirrels are in some places the most common squirrel, but because they are also nocturnal like owls, we don’t see them very often and don’t realize they’re there,” he said.The question then arises of how does one get more into viewing nature without putting too much of a footprint on the environment. The habits of nocturnal creatures can be easily disturbed, but Mathys gives a few tips on where to get started.“The key to having good interactions with wildlife is that the more time you spend outdoors, the more likely you are to find something interesting or new and see something different,” he said. “The tip as far as not disturbing things is to do everything in moderation. If you were, for instance, to play songs to have owls come in, to not do that over and over and over again. Do not do that sort of thing in areas where lots of people do it all the time. Think about how this might affect the wildlife. If you see you’re having a negative effect, stop and back away and let the animals go back to their normal lives.”Mathys explained that, though he does play songs to help call in owls during the walk each year, that is the only time he does such a thing on his property. The rest of the time, he simply walks the woods and fields with a sharp eye.When asked about the effect modern agriculture is having on native wildlife, he said there are positives and negatives.“Like anything that humans do to modify the environment, some of it’s going to be positive for some species and negative for others. One of the things that we see with larger scale agriculture is that we tend to reduce the diversity of the habitat and so we end up with lots of large fields of corn and soybeans, which in many cases are just empty fields in the winter, which don’t provide a lot of habitat for wildlife,” Mathys said. “An unfortunate trend we’ve seen, especially in the last 30 or 40 years, is the removal of fence rows, which have provided a lot of wildlife habitat. With those gone, unfortunately it’s kind of left a lot of big fields without a lot of good places for wildlife. On the other hand, there are a few species that benefit so it’s not necessarily all bad for all species.”For those that have spent their fair share of time outdoors and are ready to take the next step for wildlife observation, Mathys said getting involved in an area birding society is a good way to go.“The local Audubon chapters or bird clubs are really useful because anybody from the public is free to come on,” he said. “They’ll be people there that are knowledgeable and able to provide some guidance and help to identify the organisms. All those chapters and various bird clubs will have talks given by various people in the community — scientists or other interested people — who provide background information and part knowledge on those subjects.”last_img read more

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