SOHN Manchester Group dinner

first_img Comments are closed. SOHN Manchester Group dinnerOn 1 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article An enjoyable annual dinner at The Britannia Country House Hotel, Didsbury,Manchester on November 30 was attended by 45 members and guests. CarolBannister was unable to attend so Jane Ingham, an elected member of the Societyof Occupational Health Nurses (SOHN) Policy and Practice Committee, whorecently represented SOHN at the Federation of Occupational Health NursesCongress in Strasbourg, was her very able replacement.The role of the OH nurse in public health and the need to communicate withother health professionals were key points made both at the recent RCNconference in Nottingham and by Jane during her after-dinner speech. This is anarea which the Greater Manchester group has already begun to explore.Among the guests were Helen Keeping, a community nurse adviser and PhyllisSeddon, a practice nurse adviser, who made worthwhile contributions to thelively debate which followed Jane’s talk.Arnold joins Cheviot ArtusCheviot Artus has expanded its recruitment division, Cheviot ArtusRecruitment. The “new recruit” is Angela Arnold, an OH-qualifiedpractitioner. In addition to her two year’s experience in recruitmentconsultancy, Angela’s wide knowledge of the occupational health field hasencompassed working ‘on the other side of the timesheet’ as an agency nurse. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Resource Guide: Manual handling

first_imgResource Guide: Manual handlingOn 1 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Alist of useful on-line resources to help you in your professional research andmanual handling needswww.hse.gov.ukTheHealth and Safety Executive’s web site remains the best and most detailedsource of information relating to manual handling, containing a wealth of pressreleases, up-to-date guidance and other publications available to occupationalhealth professionals. Although not the easiest site to use, especially thosenot confident with using the Internet, it is well worth persevering, as anyinformation that you need should be contained within its pages. [email protected]: 01606 330660fax: 01606 330644ACheshire-based team of occupational health-trained and qualified doctors andnurses providing specialist OH services to companies in the North West. Thecompany’s web site gives details of all its training areas, including a sectionon manual handling training. A clear and easy to negotiate site, providing someinformative background material on many aspects of occupational health.www.britishsafetycouncil.co.ukTel:020-8741 1231Fax: 020-8741 4555Generalinformation about health and safety issues in the workplace. the site includesan effective search engine allowing access to archived information.Instituteof Occupational Health and Safetywww.iosh.co.ukwww.uksafety.netDirectoryof UK health, safety and environmental web sites. Alisting of a large number of web sites of companies and organisations relatingto health and safety at work. Of limited use but worth persevering if you havethe patience to find specific information about manual handling.www.enviro.co.ukEnviroLimitedCarlton House28/9 Carlton TerracePortsladeBrightonBN41 1XF01273 [email protected] range of bespoke and standard risk assessment documentation. Offers a numberof training courses on health and safety issues, including manual handling.www.napier.ac.ukComputer-basedtraining and information and risk assessment package developed by NapierUniversity in Edin- burgh, and designed for university employees. However, it containssome useful background information on manual handling that an OH professionalmight find valuable. It also includes information on creating your own specifictraining module, a built in risk assessment facility and background informationabout the manual handling operations regulations 1992. www.general.monash.edu.auManualHandling Risk Assessment in Manufacturing Industries – a focus on women.Ratheran obscure Australian site but offers some interesting background informationon manual handling from the perspective of female employees. www.marton.co.ukTel:01244 399099Fax: 01244 399539Marton houseGrange RoadChester CH2 2ANe-mail: [email protected] is a company offering manual handling awareness training, assistingmobility and risk assessment. Course content includes an introduction to manualhandling, European and UK legislation explained, accident prevention, basicanatomy, lifting principles and practical assessments. www.bbc.co.uk/healthAnexcellent source of news information on all aspects of manual handling and riskin the workplace. Departmentof Health www.doh.gov.ukCompiledby Kate RouyThislisting is not exhaustive and the journal welcomes further additions fromreaders as well as suggestions for further topics of interest to include inthis series Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Comment: lessons of history that are still relevant today

first_imgComment: lessons of history that are still relevant todayOn 20 Feb 2001 in Personnel Today Fashion dictates that we are all modernisers now. Whichmodern manager remains a personnel officer when their contemporaries are HRmanagers? But I have acquired a new respect for the value of experience throughthe celebrations of my union’s 150th anniversary. The Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union was foundedin 1851. It was distinctive because it organised skilled people on the basis ofa mixture of practical, pre-welfare state benefits, and policies aboutemployment issues. What members really wanted was respect for theircontribution to our country’s dominance in the world of manufacturing. Theyrevered what it meant to be an engineer in Victorian Britain. What they really showed, though, was that they couldvoluntarily organise a wealthy modern institution. It was a part of workingclass emancipation to learn the mystery of self-help in creating an institutionin a hostile environment. They started a fight with employers over compulsoryovertime and piecework, and lost. The employers stood on the right to manage,and won. But the union did not disappear like many of its rivals andpredecessors. The organisation was so robust that it lived to fight anotherday.What is interesting is the key lesson the union learnt backin 1852. General secretary William Allen told members after the dispute, “We donot anticipate any future struggles such as we have seen for dominance orsuperiority – struggles in which all victors as well as vanquished fearfullysuffer. We think both parties are wiser than they were and more moderate. “We recognise that for trade societies to advance theinterests of the artisan, they must become different from what they have been.They must assume a different form, use another set of means. They must strivefor higher objects and, instead of accumulating power to do battle with otherinterests, they must husband resources to forward that intelligent, industrialprocess which will lift the operative into a higher condition. This will givehim a more stable position, add to his comforts and increase his opportunitiesfor knowledge.” We had dozens of employers at the recent celebrations, manyof them from industries unheard of in 1852. We even forgot old battles andwelcomed the Engineering Employers Federation as guests. But our pride and pleasure in the union’s role was madepossible only by learning the lessons of history. As I sat at the Grosvenor inPark Lane listening to Gordon Brown, Sir Ken Jackson and the president of thebiggest union in the world, IG Metall, expand on modern industrial relations,the need for American standards of productivity and the role of lifelonglearning in putting the “great” into Great Britain, I knew William Allen wouldhave understood the argument. After all, he was the first to use it. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Terrorist attack raises huge concerns for all

first_imgTerrorist attack raises huge concerns for allOn 18 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. The scale of last week’s terrorist attack on the US has left the worldreeling and the shock waves have reached everyone. Two of those who died onboard American Airlines Flight 11 were staff at a sister company of RBI – whichpublishes Personnel Today. Our condolences go to the families and colleagues ofJeff Mladenik and Andrew Curry Green, who were employees of Cahners. HR professionals in companies directly affected have worked alongsidecolleagues to track staff and support anxious and distraught families orcolleagues. “It’s amazing how this has touched people globally. Situations likethis bring out the best in people,” said John Reid-Dodick, global directorof HR at Reuters. “The biggest shock is to discover we are an organisation with hugefeelings for each other,” said Clive Newton, global head of HR atPricewaterhouseCoopers. Companies are pouring great efforts into providing counselling to thosebereaved and exploiting every available technology to provide communicationchannels for those caught up in the catastrophe. There are huge HR challengesin the long term. Some firms have lost hundreds of staff including many topdecision-makers. No disaster recovery programme can cover that eventuality. Perhaps the most frightening implication of the attack on the World TradeCentre is that it was targeted precisely because it was a symbol of globaltrade, just as the Pentagon represents foreign policy. It was an attack on thebusiness community of the US and its allies. For that reason, any solution must involve business leaders and there aresearching questions to answer. Ultimately, companies have one over-archingconcern. They will want to do everything in their power to help ensureemployees are never again victims of events like this. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Don’t kick the habit

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Don’t kick the habitOn 1 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Unleashing human potential should be the goal of every HR department, but arecent survey suggests that employees are either indifferent or demoralised bytheir jobs. One way of overcoming this malaise is to revisit The 7 Habits ofHighly Effective People, which having sold more than 10 million copies, sits onmany executive shelves. Author Stephen R Covey outlines why his book should beback at the top of your reading listIncreasing globalisation, with more people working across more continentsmeans that management practices are increasingly becoming a worldwidecommodity. But the global spread of people and ideas is not confined to goodpractices and positive opinions. And with a recent Gallup poll in the UKrevealing that more than 60 per cent of employees there are demoralised bytheir jobs with a further 20 per cent simply not caring about their work,motivating workforces is clearly something that needs to be urgently addressed.The situation is not confined to the UK, however. And if you multiply the £48bnannual cost to the UK economy by the rest of the developed world at least, thescale of the problem becomes clear. With such a situation it is important to consider the employee as a wholeperson with diverse needs for physical, social/emotional, spiritual and mentalwell-being. And this is the challenge for HR professionals, who must considerthemselves as their organisation’s change agent. HR must assess the needs ofemployees and concentrate on their main role, which is helping unleash humanpotential. It is only when companies focus on this approach – creating aculture which values each employee for their individuality, their needs,competencies and potential – that they will they will begin to tackle thedreaded ‘Monday morning blues’. The key to increasing morale and motivation can be found in a provenframework of thinking, which is founded on universal, timeless and self-evidentprinciples. When I wrote The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (firstpublished in 1990) – which are simply a framework of principles – I found that “effectiveness”,whether at home or at work, was key to achieving our hopes, dreams and goals. Effectiveness is simply getting results you want in a way that enables youto get even greater results in the future. Principles of effectiveness lead totrue success – enduring, sustainable and balanced success. Consider theprinciple of trust. Can you have trust without trustworthy behaviour? This is anatural law, which governs our lives, and if broken there are also naturalconsequences. The challenge and opportunity for HR professionals is to assess the currentcondition of their organisation and then to create principle-centred change.Today’s workforce is primarily led by the knowledge worker, and to get thegreatest performance and productivity from such a worker, organisations mustrecognise the heart, mind and soul of this new breed. Peak performers, with few exceptions, are highly self-motivated by a deepand personal sense of mission. Each of us, it seems, has a personal reason fordoing what we do. When HR taps into an individual’s need to fulfill his or herpotential, talents, education, skills and training, then motivation andleadership become self-directed. This is the key to unleashing human potential– tapping into people’s personal energy and creativity and allowing them towork with purpose and meaning. This, of course, cannot come from command andcontrol systems, which suck out personal energy and prevents true humanaccomplishment. Creating a truly empowering and nurturing work environment begins withprinciples, which if consistently adhered to, can bring effective, lastingchange, greater performance and higher productivity. I teach the ‘7 Habits’ – aframework, which embodies principles. You may call them something else, butprinciples of effectiveness share the same roots – they are grounded inbehaviour such as, being proactive or taking responsibility and accountabilityfor self. If followed sequentially and habitually, the seven habits cansignificantly improve the way we approach the pressures of work, ourorganisation and our colleagues without ignoring our own welfare and the needsof those closest to us. The first three habits create the ‘Private Victory’, where individuals learnto master and create their character; the next three teach the ‘PublicVictory’, where individual responsibly creates interdependence with externalrelationships, or at the organisational level. The final habit encouragesrevisiting the previous six on a regular basis. On a global scale, the HR profession must not get bogged down inadministration, relocation, compensation and so forth. It must not forget thatits key role is helping human capital perform. By living these principles themselves, HR professionals can encourageemployees to do the same and together create a principle-centred culture, whichvalues each individual’s contribution. By following the seven habits, thedemoralisation suggested by the Gallup poll in the UK will be dramaticallyreduced and employees will stop going through the motions and instead see thework that they do as mutually beneficial and purposeful for both themselves andthe company. The seven habits1 Be proactiveThis means taking the initiative to act positively to influencea situation. Instead of saying ‘there’s nothing I can do’, say ‘let’s look atthe alternatives’. This should not be confused with arrogance or being pushy.It is simply the recognition that you can influence what happens and it is yourresponsibility to do so. The other six habits all depend on the ability to beproactive – each puts the responsibility and accountability on us to act, toexercise choice.2 Begin with an endin mindAll things are created twice – there is a mental creation,followed by a physical creation. Mental creation is based on the principles ofpersonal leadership or having a goal – what are the things we want toaccomplish? The physical is achieved by managing a process – how will we bestaccomplish these things? But leadership must come first. Management is theefficiency in climbing the ladder to success, but leadership determines whetherthe ladder is leaning against the right wall.3 Put first things firstThis is the step to achieving the physical creation and doingwhat matters most. We can manage our time and activities according to what isurgent/not urgent, important/not important. Effective personal management isgenerally achieved by dealing with those activities that are not urgent but areimportant, such as planning, preparation, writing a personal mission statementand building relationships – those things that we need to do but seldom getaround to doing. 4Think win-winIn the long term, it benefits nobody if one person’s success isachieved at the expense, or exclusion from success, of others. Win-win is the beliefthat there is another alternative, beyond the two extremes of winning orlosing, resulting in agreements and solutions that are mutually beneficial.5 seekfirst to understand and then to be understoodThis is the key to true communication and relationship building– by listening empathetically with the intent to understand others, rather thanwith the intent to reply or contradict. Seeking to understand takes empathy andkindness; seeking to be understood takes patience and courage. Effectivenesslies in balancing the two.6 SynergySynergy is the fruit of mutual respect, the sum of all of theparts and the principle of mutual co-operation and valuing differences. It isabout producing a third alternative – not my way, not your way, but a third waythat is better than either of us would come up with individually.7 Sharpening the sawThe final element of the cycle increases our capacity to liveall other habits of effectiveness by constantly renewing ourselves in the fourbasic areas of life: physical, social/emotional, mental and spiritual. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Air traffic staff shortage leads to safety concerns

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Overworked air traffic controllers will continue to suffer due to staffshortages after it emerged that only three new controllers will pass throughtraining this year. The severity of the situation at National Air Traffic Services’ (NATS) £623mcentre at Swanwick, which is 40 controllers short of working capacity, wasrevealed to Personnel Today by David Luxton, national secretary at controllers’union Prospect. NATS hit the headlines last month after it was revealed that the number ofoverload reports – filed by air-traffic controllers when they feel theirworkload is so high, safety is being compromised – has doubled since thebeginning of the year. Luxton said there is no short-term solution to the staffing problems,because it takes three to four years of training before a controller becomesfully operational, and only three will be qualified to that standard by the endof the year. “Without enough staff, you have to shut air sectors. It’s like closingdown lanes on the motorway and trying to re-route the remaining traffic,”said Luxton. The staff shortages and resulting flight delays are now becoming so bad thatNATS is consider- ing re-employing retired controllers in non-operationalroles. Luxton said the problem was first highlighted three years ago, but wasnot addressed. “Controllers feel they have been ignored. They’ve been saying therewasn’t enough manpower for three years,” he said. Prospect is balloting its members later this month over a proposed 10 percent pay rise over two years. NATS has also agreed to a new incentive scheme to help retain staff and areview of employee relations, communications, manpower planning andorganisational culture. A spokesman for NATS said: “We have a number of people in differentstages of training, some of whom will be available before the end of theyear.” By Ross Wigham Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Air traffic staff shortage leads to safety concernsOn 20 Aug 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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E-learning news in brief

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. E-learning news in briefOn 1 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today This month’s e-learning news in brief – Saba Analytics is a new tool that enables business to analyse, understandand improve their e-learning pages. One user, Kinko, says the software enablesit to measure the impact of its e-learning investments on sales on aproduct-by-product basis.  www.saba.com– Jenison, KnowledgePool and Kognita are behind a new consortium providingleading charities with personalised e-learning web portals. The charitiesinclude the Prince’s Trust, Scope, the Scout Association and VSO.  www.jenison.co.uk   www.knowledgepool.com  www.kognita.com– Anti-Money Laundering basics is a new e-learning training solutiondeveloped by PriceWaterhouseCoopers. Aimed at financial institutions, it meetsspecific regulations and compliance best practices. It was developed inassociation with Knowledge Platform and marketed by Icus.  www.icus.net– Blended learning provider OP&S has made an extension for theinstructional design tool Designer’s Edge available for internet design packageMacromedia Dreamweaver. It enables instructional design teams to work in parallelwith web developers.  www.ops.ltd.uk  www.macromedia.com Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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…in brief

first_img Previous Article Next Article This week’s news …in briefThe happy valleys Workers in Wales are ‘significantly happier’ in their jobs than thoseworking in other regions across the UK. A study by the Royal Economic Societyfound that while Wales has the lowest wages in the UK, job satisfaction levelswere “significantly higher” than anywhere else in the country. Itsuggested that being in work may be regarded more favourably in more depressedregions.  www.res.org.ukAgeism inevitable The majority of UK professionals are unconcerned about the prevalence ofageism in the workplace, a new survey has claimed. A poll of 264 businessleaders by recruitment firm, Macildowie, found that while 68 per centacknowledged ageism existed, only 15 per cent felt that proposed legislation woulddirectly improve the prospects of older workers.  www.macildowie.comRush to be IT girls Women are breaking into the male-dominated IT sector, with more thanthree-quarters of some specialist roles expected to be taken by women by 2006.Risk management company, Vizuri, says it has seen a major increase in thenumber of women involved in software testing – one of the most technical andcomplicated arenas of the IT industry.  www.vizuri.wsRMT focus on safety The RMT union is demanding London Underground supply frontline staff withtraining and emergency breathing apparatus to protect them from potentialterrorist attacks. The calls come after reports that police have foiled aplanned poison-gas attack on London Underground or Gatwick Airport.  www.rmt.org.uk Comments are closed. …in briefOn 13 Apr 2004 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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This week’s global HR news in brief

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. This week’s global HR news in briefOn 18 Jul 2006 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Worldwide increase in workplace violenceThe International Labour Organization (ILO) has warned of a worldwide rise in violence at work, and a growing variety of threats, which are increasingly psychological, rather than physical. In its latest global study of workplace violence, the ILO said: “Bullying, harassment, mobbing and allied behaviours can be just as damaging as outright physical violence. Today, the instability of many types of jobs places huge pressures on workplaces, and we’re seeing more of these forms of violence.” The report notes that professions previously regarded as non-violent, such as teaching, social services and library services, are suffering. Even in Japan, long regarded as a non-violent country, the number of disputes seems to be growing over time, the report states.Germans develop lie detector test for new recruitsGerman scientists have developed a test which they claim can differentiate honest candidates from potential criminals in job interviews. Each year, German firms lose about €3bn (£2bn) to staff who steal company property. But researchers from the Technical University in Darmstadt say their ‘psychological integrity test’ helps to identify applicants with a tendency towards deception and theft. Tested on 363 employed volunteers and 200 convicted thieves, the survey showed dishonest participants saw theft in the office – even of a pen – as more or less normal. The volunteers were asked to agree or disagree with 69 statements, such as: ‘You may take things that have been lying around the office for a long time’, and ‘It’s no wonder that things are stolen when people are so badly paid’. Researcher Jens Hoffman said the test was difficult to cheat because if an applicant only gave neutral answers, “alarm bells would start ringing”.Equal health benefits for gay couples now widespread in US For the first time, the majority of the largest 500 listed companies in the US now offer health insurance benefits to same-sex domestic partners of staff, according to a report from the gay rights group the Human Rights Campaign Foundation.Its figures reveal that 253 Fortune 500 companies provide equal benefits, with seven firms having added such policies in the past six months. That figure compares with 219 companies in 2004 and 246 in 2005. Joe Solmonese, the group’s president, said: “While protection for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Americans has stalled in Congress, corporate America continues to surge ahead. It’s an issue of basic fairness and good business.” Although 49% of the firms surveyed have not extended health benefits to gay partners, the entire Fortune 500 has taken steps toward friendlier policies, Solmonese added.Netherlands to scrap civil servant retirement ageThe Netherlands wants to abolish the compulsory retirement age of 65 for civil servants to encourage staff to work longer. The decision is part of a package of measures to persuade older workers to keep active in the labour market for as long as possible. The government plans to actively target employers, staff and HR departments to highlight the possibilities for older workers. The Ministry of Social Affairs said there were many cultural barriers preventing older staff from thriving, such as the public’s perception that people aged over 65 shouldn’t work. The information campaign will focus on the legal position of staff aged over 65. “Both employers and workers must think of different conditions, and a more tailor-made contract,” the ministry said.last_img read more

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From here to maternity

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. From here to maternityOn 8 Nov 2006 in Personnel Today Q What changes to the maternity leave provisions were made on 1 October 2006? A The changes affect women with an expected week of childbirth (EWC) on or after 1 April 2007. Where an employee has an EWC prior to this date, regardless of her length of service, she is entitled to ordinary maternity leave, but must have 26 weeks’ continuous service as at the end of the 15th week before the EWC to qualify for additional maternity leave. For women with an EWC on or after 1 April 2007 this requirement has been removed, so that all employees who qualify for ordinary maternity leave also qualify for additional maternity leave. This means that they are entitled to 52 weeks’ maternity leave in total, and are able to take advantage of the concurrent increase in statutory maternity pay from 26 weeks to 39 weeks. The new provisions also mean that an employee on maternity leave can agree to work for her employer for up to 10 days during her maternity leave without bringing her maternity leave period or pay to an end. These keeping-in-touch days are by arrangement between the employer and employee, with the employer having no right to demand that work is undertaken and the employee having no right to be offered such work. While a woman is not required to forewarn her employer if she intends to return to work the day after her maternity leave ends, she must give notice if she wishes to return to work at an earlier date. Women with an EWC prior to 1 April 2007 must give 28 days’ notice, but this has been extended to eight weeks’ notice for women with an EWC on or after this date. A woman may change her mind about her return date, provided that she gives at least eight weeks’ notice before whichever is earlier: the date on which she now intends to return or the date on which she had intended to return. Q As the statutory maternity pay period has been extended to 39 weeks, has the ordinary maternity leave period also been extended? A To qualify for statutory maternity pay an employee must have 26 weeks’ continuous service into the 15th week before her EWC and average earnings of at least the lower earnings limit for National Insurance purposes. While qualifying women with an EWC prior to 1 April 2007 are entitled to up to 26 weeks’ statutory maternity pay, this has been extended to 39 weeks for women with an EWC on or after this date. All women with an EWC on or after 1 April 2007 are entitled to 52 weeks’ maternity leave. This consists of 26 weeks’ ordinary maternity leave, followed immediately by 26 weeks’ additional maternity leave. Statutory maternity pay is, therefore, payable for the 26-week ordinary maternity leave period and 13 weeks of the additional maternity leave period. Q If an employee with an EWC beginning 1 April 2007 gives birth before this date, how many weeks’ statutory maternity pay will she be entitled to? A The new provisions entitling pregnant employees to 39 weeks’ statutory maternity pay apply to women with an EWC beginning on or after 1 April 2007, regardless of when their baby is born. If her baby is born early, a woman with an EWC on or after this date will still be entitled to 39 weeks’ statutory maternity pay. Women with an EWC prior to this date are entitled to 26 weeks’ statutory maternity pay, regardless of when their baby is born. If her baby is born late, a woman with an EWC before 1 April 2007 will be entitled to 26 weeks’ statutory maternity pay. Q Under the new provisions can a woman return to work at the end of ordinary maternity leave without giving notice? A Once an employee has given notification of the day on which she intends to begin her maternity leave, the employer must respond within 28 days, informing her of the date on which her maternity leave will end. The employee does not need to give notice of her return to work if she returns on the day after the end of her maternity leave, which for all women with an EWC on or after 1 April 2007 is a period of 52 weeks. If, however, an employee wishes to take only 26 weeks’ ordinary maternity leave – for example, because she wants to guarantee her right to return to the same job – she must give the employer eight weeks’ notice of her return to work because she will be returning to work before her full 52-week leave entitlement has ended. Q Can an employer contact an employee on maternity leave to ask if and when she intends to return to work? A The law was previously unclear about the extent to which employers were permitted to contact employees on maternity leave. However, where the EWC is on or after 1 April 2007, there is now a specific statutory provision enabling reasonable contact to be made between employer and employee during maternity leave – for example, to discuss the employee’s return to work – without it bringing the period of maternity leave to an end. Either party is entitled to make reasonable contact. However, if the employer does contact the employee in these circumstances, the employee is under no statutory obligation to reply. She is entitled simply to return to work at the end of additional maternity leave. If the employee wishes to return early, she must give eight weeks’ prior notice. If the employee does not intend to return to work at all, she is obliged to give the notice of termination required by the contract of employment. Subject to these notice periods being given where appropriate, there is nothing the employer can do if the employee refuses to confirm on request if or when she intends to return to work.XpertHR is the UK’s biggest and most comprehensive source of HR information made available as a single online subscription service www.xperthr.co.ukFor more on the Work and Families Act, turn to page 22 UK mothers to benefit from extended paid maternity leave www.personneltoday.com/37478.article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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