A ‘Dramatically Smaller’ Market for Coal

first_imgA ‘Dramatically Smaller’ Market for Coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Christina Nunez for National Geographic:Market trends for coal “have turned markedly negative over recent months, contrary to many still optimistic forecasts,” says Tim Buckley of the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a research group that supports sustainable energy.Peabody, based in St. Louis, joins other American coal companies that have recently declared bankruptcy, including Arch Coal and Alpha Natural Resources. Peabody produces roughly 170 million metric tons of coal a year—close to a fifth of the U.S. supply. (The world’s largest producer, Coal India, puts out about twice as much.)Demand for its product is going down: The U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts natural gas will overtake coal as the leading fuel for the nation’s electricity in 2016. Last year, 80 percent of the power supply that was shut down came from coal.The wobbly outlook extends beyond the United States. China, the world’s top polluter, says its coal consumption dropped over the past two years, and it recently halted construction on new coal-fired plants in 15 regions.The changed market seems to have caught U.S. companies off guard. “Everybody thought they would be exporting lots of coal into China,” energy consultant Katherine Hamilton commented on a recent Energy Gang podcast, “and that’s just not going to happen.”India’s coal imports are also down, and though the country is boosting domestic coal output, it’s also making a huge push to expand solar energy, with plans to install a hundred gigawatts of capacity over the next six years.Indeed, Buckley says India has invested so massively in solar that it’s now cheaper there compared to power from a new plant running on imported coal: “No one in the coal industry, no one in the [International Energy Agency], no one at Peabody saw that coming.”Efforts to make coal power “clean,” or at least clean enough to pass regulatory muster, by capturing carbon at the smokestack remain expensive and not quite proven—Canada’s $1.1 billion Boundary Dam project is facing political heat for its so far underwhelming results.Meanwhile, cleaner energy options, bolstered by the Paris agreement and a growing awareness of coal’s social and health costs, have galloped ahead as prices continue to fall. (See the surprising countries where solar and wind are booming.)Still, coal is far from disappearing. China and India both have approved hundreds of new coal-fired power plants, and the fuel’s use remains robust in countries from Australia to Turkey. And where coal is swapped out for natural gas, the transition away from all fossil fuels remains further off than many climate advocates would hope.Peabody’s bankruptcy, however, symbolizes an incontrovertible trend, according to Buckley, who says the industry has refused to confront the fact that it is in decline not just because of new climate rules but pure economics.“There’s no suggestion that demand is going to go back up for coal,” he says, adding that if Peabody emerges from Chapter 11, it will face a coal market that “is going to be dramatically smaller.”Full Article: The Western World’s Largest Coal Company Declares Bankruptcylast_img read more

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More wind helps Texas grid weather heat wave

first_imgMore wind helps Texas grid weather heat wave FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享KUT:Take a rapidly growing state, add a scorching heat wave, and you have a recipe for historically high electricity use. So it was that Texas broke the record for power demand three times in the last week. Through it all, the state’s electric grid operated without major disruption. That success nevertheless revealed some interesting things about the ways we generate and consume electricity.The shuttering of three Texas coal power plants earlier this year made some people worry about the grid’s thinning generation-reserve margin. That’s basically a backup power supply we can rely on if something goes wrong with other power plants.Rolling blackouts during the heat wave could have given the coal industry ammunition as it argues for subsidies to stay afloat. But, the grid did just fine without the plants.With a smaller-than-ideal reserve margin and a massive demand for power, many industry analysts expected electricity prices to be high through much of the heat wave. But they weren’t.The reasons for those low prices are cheap natural gas and abundant wind power – and wind came on strong during the heat wave.The percentage of power that comes from wind has been steadily increasing for years, [according to Joshua Rhodes, a research fellow at the Energy Institute at UT Austin], but at some times during the last week wind was “outperforming its own forecast.” That means cheaper power for consumers, he says. “The grid just isn’t as stressed, because there’s just so much wind.”More: The AC stayed on: 3 takeaways from Texas’ scorching heat wavelast_img read more

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Iowa co-op announces plans for state’s largest solar project

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Radio Iowa:Central Iowa Power Cooperative (CIPCO) has announced plans to develop what would be the largest solar project in Iowa. CIPCO is partnering with Clenera of Boise, Idaho to develop the project.Jared McKee is Clenera’s director of business development. “It will be 100 megawatts AC. So that’s actually the amount of power that will be delivered to the transmission system. And it’s estimated to be roughly 200 megawatt hours annually,” McKee explains. The solar facility will be built on 800 acres of land in Louisa County near Wapello.McKee says they are still working on the details and won’t start putting up panels for at least the end of the coming year. He says construction is slated for the end of 2019 and the start of 2020. McKee says they are looking at the best types of solar panels to use at the facility.McKee says more solar is being built in Iowa as the costs continue to drop. “Technology is getting better, the efficiency is getting greater. We’re moving with our suppliers to have better technology and better processes to really drive down rates,” McKee says. This is the second major solar project announced by CIPCO and goes along with the 60-megawatt project to repower the Summit Lake Generating Station in Creston. The project includes demolition of its 70-year old steam plant and installation of efficient natural gas-fired reciprocating engines by late 2022.CIPCO says the increased use of solar power will help offset the nuclear power being lost by the closing of the Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC) in Palo in 2020. CIPCO is 20 percent owner of the nuclear plant and receives 20 percent of its generating capacity from that plant.More: Solar power project proposed for Louisa County Iowa co-op announces plans for state’s largest solar projectlast_img read more

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Ohio power generator reaches agreement to emerge from bankruptcy

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Toledo Blade:FirstEnergy Solutions Corp. said Wednesday it has struck a tentative deal with its creditors to keep its Davis-Besse nuclear power plant and its other power-generating facilities in Ohio and Pennsylvania online at least through their previously announced shutdown dates.Davis-Besse — Ottawa County’s largest employer and one of Ohio’s largest sources of tax revenue — is scheduled to shut down no later than May 31, 2020. Other nuclear facilities — the Perry nuclear plant east of Cleveland and the twin-reactor Beaver Valley complex west of Pittsburgh — are scheduled to be phased out before the end of 2021 while the remaining FES coal-fired power plants are still destined to be permanently shut down by mid-2022.The proposed agreement will form the basis of a reorganization plan that is subject to approval by Judge Alan M. Koschik of U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Akron. The plan is expected to be filed by Feb. 8, the company said.“This is an important step in ensuring the value of the FES estate is maximized for the benefit of all of our stakeholders,” Donald Schneider, FES president, said in a prepared statement. “It is important to note that nothing in this agreement provides for the company to continue operating its fossil or nuclear generation assets beyond their currently contemplated deactivation dates. Without legislative support and market reforms, operating beyond those dates will be a significant challenge.”During a conference call with The Blade following the announcement, David Griffing, FirstEnergy Solutions vice president of governmental affairs, said company officials are “working like crazy trying to extend the lives of those plants” but continue to get little response to its calls for legislative relief on the state or federal levels.No signs of a buyer or bailout have emerged yet. FES and its parent, FirstEnergy Corp., have lobbied for relief from record-low natural gas prices for years.More: Deal could keep Davis-Besse online until at least May 31, 2020 Ohio power generator reaches agreement to emerge from bankruptcylast_img read more

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Google announces deals for 1.6GW of new wind and solar generation

first_imgGoogle announces deals for 1.6GW of new wind and solar generation FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Google announced a package of renewables deals on Thursday totaling 1,600 megawatts, which the tech behemoth says is the largest corporate renewables purchase in history.Made up of 18 deals, Google’s projects will be built across the U.S., Europe and in Chile. The company said the purchases will increase its total wind and solar agreements by more than 40 percent.Amazon joined Google in dropping a big commitment on Thursday, announcing plans to achieve 100 percent renewable energy by 2030 and net-zero carbon by 2040. In a statement, CEO Jeff Bezos said Amazon was “done being in the middle of the herd on this issue.”Even when companies lock in 100 percent renewables commitments, it can be tricky to quantify their environmental impact. A company’s demand for renewables doesn’t necessarily shut down fossil fuel plants and encourage building new wind or solar in their place.“We’re not buying power from existing wind and solar farms, but instead are making long-term purchase commitments that result in the development of new projects,” wrote CEO Sundar Pichai of Google’s 1,600-megawatt announcement in a note published Thursday. More than half of the new Google projects are solar, following on a trend of corporate renewables purchasers turning toward offsite solar as a low-cost option. Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables forecasts solar will overtake wind in the mid-2020s as the go-to choice for offsite corporate renewables purchases. In the U.S., all of Google’s new projects will be solar, with 75 megawatts in South Carolina and 490 megawatts in Texas.More: ‘Largest ever’: Google announces 1.6GW of renewables purchaseslast_img read more

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Big battery in Australia proves profitable as Neoen recovers capital costs in just two years

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:It’s taken just a little over two years for the Tesla big battery, officially known as the Hornsdale Power Reserve, to re-coup in revenue the cost of construction of what remains the world’s biggest lithium ion battery.Neoen, the French-based owner and operator of the Tesla big battery at Hornsdale revealed on Thursday (Paris time) that the installation recorded five-fold increase in revenue in the first quarter underpinned a 65 percent boost in first quarter revenue for the group as a whole.The huge revenue boost from battery storage was the result of unusual – and likely unrepeatable – conditions that occurred when a tornado tore down the main transmission link between Victoria and South Australia in late January. That required the Hornsdale, the biggest lithium-ion battery storage facility in the world, and other two smaller big batteries in the state – Lake Bonney and Dalrymple North – to play critical roles in managing system security in South Australia which was forced to operate as an effective energy “island” for nearly three weeks. The intervention – mandated and supervised by the Australian Energy Market Operator – resulted in a revenue increase from storage operations to €21.6 million ($A36.2 million) in the first quarter of 2020, compared to €4.2 million in the first quarter of 2019. A small fraction of this revenue came from other small storage facilities operated by Neoen.The significance of this number is that the Tesla big battery at Hornsdale earned more revenue in the first quarter than it did in all of last year, when it recorded a 14 per cent rise in annual revenue to €20.5 million ($A33.2 million). It also means that total revenue from the Hornsdale battery has already exceeded its construction cost (around $A96 million) in little more than two years since it began operations in late 2017. At least half of that will be reflected as net income, indicating a phenomenal return on investment for the Hornsdale big battery.At the same time, the Hornsdale battery is estimated to have delivered savings of at least $150 million to consumers by keeping electricity and system costs below where they would have been in its absence, when the market was totally controlled by the state’s existing gas operators.[Giles Parkinson]More: Tesla big battery recoups cost of construction in little over two years Big battery in Australia proves profitable as Neoen recovers capital costs in just two yearslast_img read more

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Are you an athlete if you don’t compete?

first_imgYESCompetitions are a way to separate athletes into groups-swiftest, highest, strongest-but we come to them as athletes and leave just the same, no matter the score. A true athlete is one that can find competition without another person in sight and strives to better their physical ability without the reward of fame or glory.– Jessica Fuller, Pisgah Forest, N.C.As the activities we enjoy become increasingly competitive, much of the camaraderie and friendship that exists within athletic communities is lost. Those participating in these activities that become overly competitive lose sight of the beauty, the grandeur, the sheer awe that drew us all to the outdoors. Those who choose to participate in any activity without competing are not only athletes, but role models many people could learn from.– Lee Eschenroeder, Lynchburg, Va.There are a great many athletic folks out there whose motivation is something more than the sustenance for the ego. There are also many athletic endeavors which are spoiled by competition. Surfing, rock climbing, kayaking, come to mind. If you are trying to set a speed record for a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail, you are missing the point.– Chet Naylor, Richmond Va.I’ll be an athlete until the day I die as long as I’m trying to live a better life through exercise. Athleticism should be about doing the best one can against yourself, not placing first.– Ray Keys, Franklin County, Va.The true definition of ‘athlete’ is “a person possessing the natural or acquired traits, such as strength, agility, and endurance, that are necessary for physical exercise or sports.” Anyone can be athletic and not have the competitive bug.– Joanna Lilly, Radford Va.The term athlete just describes a person who is strong enough and agile enough to play a particular sport. My little brother, Max, went to a five-week camp (Camp Mondamin) that was non-competitive in their philosophy. Max kayaked almost every river in North Carolina, climbed, and backpacked. The counselors and campers were all athletes because they were strong enough and agile enough to kayak, climb, and hike.– The Ovett Brothers – Sam age 15, Max age 12, Roswell, Ga.As a child, I was that lazy chubby kid who was always the last to be picked (and first to be knocked out) for dodgeball in gym class. I was constantly the focus of ridicule from my more competitive classmates. Then one day in high school I decided to go take a jog on the nature trail, and I was in heaven. There was no one to compete with but myself, no scowling referees or judges, and no awards but the satisfaction of being outside. I was hooked. Now I’m a devoted hiker, backpacker, trail runner, and mountain biker. Do I consider myself an athlete? Absolutely. Competitive? Heck no; I’ll leave that for those guys in gym class.–Wally Smith, Oakwood, Ga.NOCompetition is a way to test yourself, to see how you compare with other competitors. You risk defeat, momentary pain and unhappiness, and you stand to gain a pat on the back, a trophy, a high ranking. Competition isn’t about winning. Winning comes as a result of your preparation, skill level, attitude, and a little luck. Competition is a beautiful, important, and critical element of our society.-Chaman, Roanoke, Va.Taking grandpa out of the retirement home and putting him in a chamois and a Phonak jersey does not make him an athlete. One can look like a great athlete on the outside, but have the competitive spirit of The Cowardly Lion. Strength, agility, and endurance are great physical traits, but to perform in a competitive context, one needs drive, determination, and a desire to succeed. One cannot be taken seriously if they do not push themselves to new levels every time they train for their sport.-Todd McClure, Bradenton, Fla.I believe I’m an athlete, because my body parts within compete with one another. I have a natural heartfelt desire to compete just to function against gravity. Competition is within my bones and all my body parts want in. I am my own team, and there are many players within. If I don’t compete, I’m probably six feet under. Are you an athlete if you don’t compete? No, you’re dead.-Adrian Henson, Charlottesville, Va.We all compete. Eery day there are numerous finish lines to cross, challenges to face, winners and losers. So let me wordsmith your question a bit – “You compete. Are you an athlete?” If you play, bend, move, push, pull, throw, kick, twist, hit, lift, run, walk, ride, sweat and hurt..you are an athlete. Athletes are better competitors because they go to bed each night knowing that they “have fought the good fight…finished the race and have kept the faith” (2Ti 4:7). You compete. Why aren’t you an athlete?-Tim McClung, Blacksburg, Va.last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for April 1, 2013

first_imgHaving resisted the temptation to make this an April Fool’s edition of Daily Dirt, I do have some longer reads for you today as some regional events and issues have been making it into some very prestigious national publications. All the outdoor news that’s fit to digitize for April 1, 2013:Chattanooga Continues to Do What it DoThere is a huge reason why Chattanooga, Tennessee is getting so much press lately. They have completely transformed themselves from industry dumping ground to outdoor recreation nirvana in what seems almost overnight. They were the winner of our Mountain City poll and have garnered praise from a bevy of other outdoor publications. Of course, national praise from all sides is never enough for Chattanooga; now they want to become part of the Great Eastern Trail (the GET is a north/south long distance trail that parallels the A.T.). Noog would be considered a “Trail Town” and their application seems like a slam dunk considering all the cool stuff they have going on. Read more about the process at dochattanooga.com.Go Home Math, You’re DrunkIn a piece called Drunk Math, the Atlantic is calling out small batch beer brewers for lobbying Congress for tax breaks. In response to a New York Times piece (elite journalism cat fight!) Jordan Weissmann makes the case that craft brewers do not deserve, nor should they get, a tax break on the barrels of beer they produce. He makes a compelling case against any IRS benefits, citing the growth of the industry versus the craft movement and sales, yadda yadda economics. One of the main takeaways is that the Small BREW Act would also cut taxes for Boston Brewing Company (Sam Adams), who hardly needs it, and the numbers appear to be inflated. So there’s that, plus some good arguments in the comments as well. The Southeast, with its small brew hotbeds could be affected either why the chips fall in in Congress. One thing is for certain though if craft beer prices stay the same, we’ll still buy it.Crazy Race Gets Serious CoverageSpeaking of the New York Times, they continue to impress with their outdoor sports coverage. Following great profiles of snowboarder Jeremy Jones and endurance athlete Kilian Jornet Burgada, comes an expose on one of the region’s great, eccentric foot races, the Barkley Marathons. This is one of the most brutal races in the country, made even more ghastly by the psychological warfare waged by its race organizer against…wait for it…the racers. We’ve covered the race before, but this article does a great job capturing the utter helplessness of the participants and the draconian silliness of Race Founder Gary Contrell.last_img read more

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Winter Adventure Gear

first_imgMoving Comfort Chic Hoodie – Moving Comfort has long been known for its line of women-specific athletic wear. In addition to active clothes, it also offers a line of tops that can be enjoyed post-workout. The Chic Hoodie fits into that category, while also lending itself to more active pursuits. It is a long sleeve, yogi-inspired tunic top made of DriLayer Plush, which is a super-soft quick drying fabric that drapes perfectly for a feminine, relaxed look. I find myself throwing this long top on with a pair of jeans or leggings after a trail run or bike ride to meet friends for lunch or run errands. It also sports an over-sized hood which gives it the look of a cowl-neck sweater, while serving the practical purpose of keeping your head warm on windy days. The top is perfect for hiking and travel as well with its thumb holes on the sleeve and ability to withstand wrinkling. It is one of the more versatile and comfortable active tops that I have come across and sure to find many uses in your winter wardrobe.MSRP: $85.00 Osprey Rev 1.5 Pack – Osprey is synonymous with comfortable packs. When it began making hydration packs, I was an early-adopter. Since then, hydration packs have continued to evolve and become more activity-specific. Osprey has led the charge, and continued its innovative ways with the release of the Rev series. The Rev series has two adjustable chest straps in addition to the waist strap, which allow the user to achieve a snug, personalized fit. This feature combined with the breathable back panel are critical components to a well-made hydration pack as they ensure that the pack will stay secure and dry, which prevent uncomfortable occurrences of back chafe. Ouch! In addition to the thoughtful design of the pack, the Rev series also has updated features including a media pocket, which allow you to carry and easily access you iPhone, while simultaneously protecting it from the elements. The Rev series comes in a variety of sizes from the large Rev 24 with 1465 cubic inches of pack space and a 2.5 liter hydration reservoir to the minimalist Rev 1.5 with 92 cubic inches of pack space and a 1.5 liter hydration reservoir. I find the Rev 1.5 to be perfect for longer trail runs or mid-range mountain bike outings. If you prefer a waist pack to a back pack style, the Rev Solo was made for you. With the exception of the Solo, all the Rev packs come in two sizes to allow the wearer to pick the pack that best fits her shoulders and torso.MSRP: $69.95 unnamed-2Hi-Tec Bandera Lowtop Hiking Boots: These boots were my first pair of low-cut hiking shoes. With all of the mud that has been out on the trails this winter, I wanted something that would be better equipped for the conditions than my typical running shoes. The Bandera boots have proven to be excellent in this regard. They offer greater stability thanks to a stiffer sole and exceptional traction for slippery conditions. The shoes also are breathable while keeping feet dry and warm. While they are a little beefier than trail running shoes, they are not as heavy as my hiking boots. They are also comfortable enough to wear around town on soggy days. I have my fingers crossed that we will get a couple of big snow storms before spring arrives so that I can see how they perform in snowy conditions. These shoes are meant to last for years. If you are in need of a lightweight, durable hiking shoe, pick up a pair of the Bandera lowtop or midtop boots.MSRP: $64.99 unnamedIcebreaker Long Sleeve Oasis Sherpinsky: Icebreaker has established itself as a leader in merino wool clothing. Its base layer line, made of 100% merino wool is exceptional. In addition to being warm, quick drying and soft, these tops have gotten progressively more stylish. Now rather than simply being a winter staple to be worn under outer layers, Icebreaker tops are trendy enough to stand alone as winter casual wear. The Oasis Sherpinksy top fits neatly into this category. The top is perfectfor layering underneath a wind proof layer for hiking, trail running, skiing, or biking, while also being stylish enough towear to dinner or out for drinks. It also retains the truecharacter of all Icebreaker tops in that it is odor resistant,soft and well-sized for a flattering feminine fit.MSRP: $99.99center_img While the calendar still shows that it is January, this winter has not thrown a lot of cold weather punches at us, save a few days that have reminded us that spring is not here yet. Winter will inevitably return, and when it does, you will want to be prepared to get out and enjoy all it has to offer. unnamed-1Dare2B Invigorate Jacket: While the snow has not been abundant in Asheville, area ski resorts have been able to make plenty of snow to keep trails open and skiers and riders happy. I was in need of a new ski jacket this year and was looking for something to set me apart on the slopes. After being introduced to the Dare2B line from the United Kingdom, I determined that the Invigorate jacket met all of my criteria. It sports a detachable hood, which is critical for snowy and windy days, a powder skirt to keep snow out of the jacket and my pants, along with numerous well-placed pockets for warming hands and storing keys, as well as a lift ticket/pass pocket. No more flapping lift tickets or pass. In addition, the jacket offers a goggle cleaning wipe and under arm venting which is essential if you are going to use it for backcountry skiing or snowball fights. If you have not heard of Dare2B, you are not alone. Since it is a British clothing line, you will likely not see hundreds of other skierswearing your jacket on or off piste.MSRP: $217.00last_img read more

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Ten Tips for Canoeing With Kids

first_imgThe idea of taking your young kids canoeing can be a daunting proposition. There are so many factors to account for and the downside of screwing it up can be hours of crying leading to a hatred for being on the river. Whoa, why would you even do it? Because it’s awesome.Recently my wife and I hit the river with our 3 year old and our 1 year old. It would be our youngest’s first float. We were joined by some good friends of ours, Dave and Tashia, and their son Silas. Dave and Tashia are long time friends from West Virginia, transplanted to C-Ville, and this was going to be Silas’s first time in a canoe as well. It was a beautiful day on the river.Tips For A Successful Canoe Trip With Kids:Pick a short float. Both our girls have had their first canoe trip on the same section of the James River. In the James River State Park there is a 2 – 2.5 mile float from the Canoe Landing to Dixon Landing. The entire trip is within the park and the livery will even run shuttle for you for a small fee. It is the perfect river trip length for younguns. If they get to cranky, paddle fast, you’ll be at Dixon in no time.Sunscreen and hats. This is simple. Sun burning your kids will prove unpleasant for both them and you. And people will look at you funny as you carry around a screaming 14 month old tomato.unnamed (2)Pack lots of snacks. All parents know, snacks solve lots of problems. Ziplock bags or snack cups full of crackers, popcorn, etc. will keep them happy on the river. We also pack coconut water boxes for sipping on something sweet.Bathtub Chalk. Seriously. If you can handle a little mess in your life and aren’t too OCD about the appearance of your canoe, bathtub chalk will provide lots of entertainment for your kids. And comfortable seating. I’ve found that a camp chair or kayak seat is a perfect resting place for our little ones.Bubbles make everything awesome. It’s a scientifically proven fact.unnamed (3)Plan a river trip that includes a good lunch/ swimming spot. Breaking up the paddle and tiring the kids out with some good ole fashioned river play is essential. Playtime is where the real memories are made. My 3 year old will tell you, now her favorite part of the canoe trip is playing in the rapids. Make it fun.These first few trips are not about you having your perfect day. They are about setting the stage, building a foundation of recreating outside, that will plant the seeds for future trips. It’s in those future trips that the joy will come. Some of the early trips will be tough. Deal. It gets better.  Eventually you could even get to this point, sitting up front, while your wife pilots the canoe, casting for fish while your kids snack it up.Keep it calm and keep it upright. Nothing capsizes a canoe faster than erratic movements. Even if your little tyke breaks out into a fit, stay zen, and find an immediate solution that does not involve quick, unbalancing action. Most of the time, little toddlers will enjoy sitting up front in the bow, between their parent’s legs. They’re in the action and easily entertained.Screen shot 2015-08-04 at 11.42.35 AMGive your kids their own paddle as soon as they are ready. Our 3 yr. old got her first “real” canoe paddle for Christmas this past year, a Bending Branches Twig. She was psyched to get in on the action and help paddle.PFD, PFD, PFD. Make sure everyone is wearing one. If a kid goes in the drink, they need to float and if you have to go in to get them, it’s best you have one on as well. I always wear my PFD on the water. How else can I expect my kids’ to follow that rule if I do not?Taking your kids on the river can be a daunting prospect, but with a little planning and a cool head, you can have a good time. The first trip might be bumpy, but keep trying, because the payoff is a lifetime of appreciation for outdoor recreation. Our state parks are a great place to start. Every year my wife gifts me annual passes to our VA State Parks. It’s the perfect gift because I get to share it with my girls.last_img read more

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