Ladbrokes’ long-serving PR director to depart

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Ladbrokes’ long-serving PR director to depart Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Mike Dillon will next month step down from his role as director of public relations at Ladbrokes after 46 years with the company People Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shopscenter_img Topics: People Strategy Mike Dillon will next month step down from his role as director of public relations at Ladbrokes after 46 years with the company. Dillon joined Ladbrokes in 1972 as a trainee betting shop manager and worked his way up the company to lead its public relations efforts. During his time with Ladbrokes, Dillon played a major role in saving the Grand National, the UK’s showpiece horseracing event, when it was under threat in the 1970s. Dillon, now 66, said he does not intend to retire just yet and will instead seek out a consultancy role in the horseracing sector. “I’ve had a truly amazing time with Ladbrokes with many great memories and have worked with some fantastic colleagues who made the job such a pleasure for me for so long,” Dillon said, according to the Racing Post. “I know about a lot of areas of racing, I’ve been involved in racecourse management, in sponsorship and race planning and so I’ve a broad knowledge of all aspects of the business. “From my point of view the fire still burns; I’m still very committed to a game I’m absolutely passionate about. “This is not a retirement, I’m going to put myself out there and see what’s about. “I feel I’ve got a lot to offer, the horseracing business is my true love.” Kenneth Alexander, chief executive of GVC Holdings, the parent company of Ladbrokes, paid tribute to Dillon’s commitment over the years. Alexander said: “He has a deserved reputation for being one of the most knowledgeable figures within the industry and has served Ladbrokes brilliantly. “We wish him every success in the future when he leaves our business at the end of July.”Related article: GVC completes Ladbrokes Coral takeover Email Address 7th June 2018 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

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Gauselmann Group to acquire Intralot’s Totolotek

first_img Gauselmann Group to acquire Intralot’s Totolotek Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Sports betting 26th March 2019 | By contenteditor Tags: Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Gauselmann Group has agreed a deal to acquire Totolotek, the Poland-facing sports betting subsidiary of Intralot, via a share purchase agreement. The German gambling group, via its Merkur Sportwetten subsidiary, has finalised an agreement with the lottery and gaming solutions provider and is now awaiting merger clearance to complete the deal.Active in Poland for more than 27 years, Totolotek currently employs 560 staff and has 260 retail sites across the country. Totolotek also operates online via a licensed website and mobile application. Merkur has said that the deal will enable the business to enter the Polish market, and roll out its brand in the country.“Sports betting is extremely popular in Poland and for many football fans it’s an essential part of a good match,” Merkur Sportwetten CEO Niko Steinkrauß said. “The acquisition of Totolotek is an important part of our growth strategy to open up the Polish market and thereby gain another core market in Europe alongside Germany, Austria, Denmark and Belgium.”Intralot chief financial offcier Andreas Chryssos added that the acquisition is consistent with the provider’s strategy of reducing its focus on non-core markets and to ramp up investment in key strategic territories, such as the US. “This transaction will create value for all involved parties – Gauselmann, Totolotek and Intralot – which was fundamentally important from Intralot’s point of view when deciding to proceed with this transaction,” Chryssos said. Totolotek CEO Adam Lamentowicz added: “We are delighted to have gained a strong strategic partner with Merkur Sportwetten, and the Gauselmann Group behind it. With its experience and financial strength as well as its innovative products for stationary trade and the online and mobile sector, it will help Totolotek achieve further growth.” The deal comes after Gauselmann last month also moved to strengthen its position in the UK market after its Blueprint Gaming arm acquired games developer Project.Merkur Sportwetten also recently purchased a 50% stake in BetCenter, building on an existing relationship between the Belgian sports betting operator and Gauselmann.Image: Lowdown AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Gauselmann Group has agreed a deal to acquire Totolotek, the Poland-facing sports betting subsidiary of Intralot, for an undisclosed sum. Regions: Europe Central and Eastern Europe Poland Topics: Sports betting Strategy Email Addresslast_img read more

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Monopolising affiliate compliance

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Monopolising affiliate compliance 12th June 2019 | By contenteditor Bingo Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Strategy Bingo Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Phil Blackwell asks whether high membership fees and a structure that appears to benefit only the biggest in the sector will effectively undermine new trade body Responsible Affiliates in iGaming’s (RAIG) efforts to become the voice of the industry.Periods of political uncertainty are generally not good for taboo industries.As easy targets for point scoring, the battle for parliament often coincides with renewed calls for war on drugs, alcohol, tobacco and gambling. The recent increase in remote gambling duty, designed to offset a reduction of maximum bet amounts on fixed odds betting terminals (FOBTs), is just one example of politicians appeasing the media’s demand for action.Gambling is under attack.There’s a resignation in the air at industry events, but also an emerging sense of resilience and defiance. Panel discussions, roundtables and networking chit-chat at a high-profile affiliate event in May focused almost exclusively on the viability of an affiliate trade association.Strength in numbers. Self-regulation. Taking responsibility. Being accountable. Working together. The room echoed with platitudes and idealisms, expressed to suppress warnings of Government overreaction through ignorance.What would happen if affiliates could collaborate, as well as compete?Et voila! The Responsible Affiliates in Gaming (RAiG) trade association launched just one week later. Headed by former Remote Gambling Association (RGA) CEO, Clive Hawkswood, RAiG was to be a collaboration between three industry giants: Better Collective, Racing Post and Oddschecker.This isn’t the first time an attempt has been made to unite affiliates under the umbrella of social responsibility, although it is perhaps the most significant. There’s a genuine feeling of now or never. But, before momentum drives the RAiG too far forward, I’d like to consider the consequences of doing nothing. Is inaction really irresponsible?And, more importantly, how can an association headed by such huge companies represent smaller affiliates in a way that fairly accommodates reduced budgets and resources?From riches to RAiG Let’s take a look at recent activity of RAiG’s founding members of in more detail.Better Collective – Runs over 2,000 websites and celebrates its 2017 M&A strategy as a “key player in the consolidation of the industry”. Better Collective also acquired 60% of RotoGrinders in May 2019 as part of a plan to become “the largest US sports betting affiliate”.Racing Post – Acquired a majority stake in Apsley Group International in May 2018, incorporating ownership of further affiliate websites and associated mobile apps.Oddschecker – Merged with iBus Media and rebranded as Oddschecker Global Media, following the acquisition of Sky Betting & Gaming by Stars Group in April 2018. Oddschecker claims to have involvement in one in 10 UK online bets.Each of the founding members has made significant affiliate focused investment or restructuring in the past 12 months. Each has made moves to consolidate the affiliate market and each has an incentive to act.Representatives from the above companies make up RAiG’s four-person board, alongside Clive Hawkswood. The board will remain unchanged for one year in order to determine priorities, work through issues and allow interested parties to provide input.This input must be gathered from affiliates (and operators) of all sizes to prevent an echo chamber of interests aligned only to larger corporations.All for one or one for all? The cost of RAiG associate membership will start at £5,000 for the first year and include an initial audit, conducted by impartial third party, Gambling Integrity.Full membership is set to cost affiliates up to £20,000 – a cost greater than the annual fee of some remote gambling licences. This is clearly a substantial and prohibitive expense for many businesses and poses a real threat to the certification of smaller affiliates.RAiG has stated that even those who cannot afford membership will still be invited into discussions and that it will not actively promote social responsibility measures that the only the biggest companies can afford.However, this position of accommodation itself serves to undermine the core premise of the association, and raises further ethical questions as to why the protection of smaller affiliates will be seemingly prioritised over player safety.In short, in its current proposed guise, RAiG can’t win. It is not possible to promote the highest levels of compliance on one hand and make concessions for those who can’t afford the annual fee on the other.There needs to be a a solution that incorporates a full range of player protections, as well as involving a full range of affiliates.Earning operator trust Another issue facing the RAiG, is the acknowledgement and adoption of certified affiliates by operators. Trade associations gain influence and credibility not only through membership, but also through the recognition of their members.If RAiG is to be truly successful, a significant number of operators will need to make a commitment to uphold the standards that it sets affiliates, at the expense of potentially reduced exposure and profitability.Operators will need to stand firm against non-RAiG approved affiliates ranking high in organic search or with a strong historical record of value.In order to truly embrace the virtues of the RAiG, an operator will need to place trust in the association’s audit process to the same extent that it trusts its own internal compliance team.Because unless RAiG guarantees the safety of affiliates, and is willing to underwrite fines resulting from non-compliant actions of certified members, operators will still need to conduct checks as they currently are to ensure the safety of their gambling licences.RAiG membership will be undermined by a lack of jeopardy. Terminations of affiliates are nothing new. They do not reflect anything other than individual bad actors unearthed by existing compliance and social responsibility reviews.For RAiG to genuinely be more than a mouthpiece for its members, it will need to garner real credibility, authority and most importantly, accountability, across the wider gambling industry and beyond.Creating universal value I am not against the idea of an affiliate trade association, but I do strongly believe it should be founded on three key premises:1. Certification should be affordable and accessible to all gambling affiliates, of all sizes 2. The association should be held at least partly accountable for the behaviour of its certified members 3. The outcomes of all audits should be summarised in transparent, publicly available, reportsThere are currently strong arguments against RAiG for each of the above points, especially affordability. Here’s what I would change:Monthly membership fees Large annual memberships costs can be easily absorbed into the budgets of the industry’s biggest affiliate networks, but smaller brands are far more likely to be priced out by single lump sum subscriptions. A monthly membership model will help those on tighter budgets to benefit from the insights of RAiG auditors and accreditation, while keeping costs at a manageable level.I reiterate: If the objective of RAiG is to promote the highest standards of compliance and social responsibility, it simply has no option than to make provisions that allow for every affiliate to apply, without exception.Tiered price structure based on revenues I stated earlier that the annual cost of a full RAiG membership exceeds that of many remote gambling licences in the UK. The difference? Gambling licence fees are adjusted according to the revenues of the business in question.This would provide a scaleable and incremental revenue stream for RAiG and incentivise the association to work more closely with affiliates, thus increasing profitability year on year through the adoption of new responsible practices.Universally agreed principles and transparency With just four founding members on the RAiG board and plans to keep the results of audits private, the association is leaving itself wide open to avoidable scrutiny of its impartiality and motivations.There really is no good reason not to publish at least a summary of audits for each site – good or bad. Yet again, it is irresponsible for a body looking to promote social responsibility to protect the interests of non-compliant affiliates over the safety of players.If a site falls short for any reason(s), it’s essential that this is communicated to operators and customers who may be looking to engage with the affiliate in question.Accountability to operators and support of affiliates Operators are key to RAiG’s ongoing credibility and authority. The entire programme only works if operators agree to recognise that being an RAiG member is something positive and, conversely, that not being a member is something negative.As it stands, RAiG has no power to control or influence the marketing partners of any gambling operator or affiliate. Its ultimate value is not inherent, but perceived.It is therefore in RAiG’s best interests to provide memberships and accreditation to as many affiliates as possible, and to work with companies to improve compliance when they fall short. Very few operators are going to turn away valuable traffic from affiliates that pass their own internal compliance checks and with whom they have existing long-term relationships.The association’s ultimate goal has to be complete compliance of every affiliate, at any cost. It has to provide tangible benefits and support to its members, allowing them to continue to provide tangible benefits to operators.Strength in numbers There are undoubtedly huge challenges ahead for RAiG in its attempt to establish a real foothold as an independent body and avoid the same fate as previous efforts.Creating an elitist organisation that fails to accommodate the needs and budgets of smaller affiliates is a surefire way to fail. Intentions need to be sincere, processes need to be transparent and membership needs to be inclusive.The war on gambling has just begun. It’s time to collaborate and unite; not kill each other with friendly fire.Phil Blackwell is acquisition operations manager at Lindar and responsible for the growth of affiliate site OnlineBingo.co.uk and proprietary bingo platform MrQ.com. Regions: Europe US Email Address Phil Blackwell asks whether high membership fees and a structure that appears to benefit only the biggest in the sector will effectively undermine new trade body Responsible Affiliates in iGaming’s (RAIG) efforts to become the voice of the industry.last_img read more

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Kingmaker by Big Time Gaming

first_img Kingmaker by Big Time Gaming Topics: Casino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address Ever wanted a feature so bad it hurts? Well with Kingmaker you’ve now got some light relief! BTG have flipped slots on their head to make an incredible new mechanic that is the antithesis of player expectations! Yes folks, in Kingmaker you really don’t want to see the feature!To become King you must raise the multipliers within the four kingdoms! The longer the feature takes the bigger the base game pays as unlimited multipliers adorn the four top paying symbols. Once these build up, you’ll be cursing the crowns as they tease the feature!Having said that, it’s not bad when it does drop in as you’ll be crowned with Max Megaways™ and the four combined multipliers come together to pay you a kings ransom as you retire to the throne room to count your riches…You can download the First Look Games affiliate pack for this game here!Play a demo version of the game here. center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games 13th August 2019 | By Louella Hugheslast_img read more

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Delaware igaming revenue climbs to $387,865 in January

first_img17th February 2020 | By contenteditor The Delaware Lottery was announced that online gambling revenue in the state was up 38.8% year-on-year in January, while player spending also increased by $2.8m (£2.1m/€2.6m).Revenue from Delaware’s three licensed operators amounted to $387,865 last month, compared to $279,541 last year. The January revenue total was also 26.6% higher than the £306,478 generated in the final month of 2019.Video lottery games were the main source of revenue, accounting for $249,548 of the total figure, while table games were responsible for $107,037 during the month. Poker rake and fees generated $31,280 in revenue for operators.Players wagered a total of $10.2m on online gambling in January of this year, up 37.3% from $7.4m in the corresponding month last year. Consumers won $9.9m during the month, compared to $7.2m in January 2019.Read the full story on iGB North America. Tags: Online Gambling Topics: Finance The Delaware Lottery was announced that online gambling revenue in the state was up 38.8% year-on-year in January, while player spending also increased by $2.8m. Delaware igaming revenue climbs to $387,865 in January Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address Regions: US Delaware Financelast_img read more

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Rightlander rolls out new bonus monitoring tool in Spain

first_img Rightlander rolls out new bonus monitoring tool in Spain Tags: Online Gambling Compliance monitoring specialist Rightlander.com has announced the launch of a new ‘fast track’ bonus tracking report for Spain in response to the government’s decision to restrict online gambling advertising during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. Regions: Europe Southern Europe Spain Topics: Marketing & affiliates Tech & innovation Compliance monitoring specialist Rightlander.com has announced the launch of a new ‘fast track’ bonus tracking report for Spain in response to the government’s decision to restrict online gambling advertising during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic.Article 37 of Royal Decree 11/2020, which came into effect on 3 April, states that audio-visual communications for gambling operators will only be permitted to broadcast between 1AM and 5AM.Other measures include a ban on targeted email communications and direct advertising on social media, as well as acquisition or retention campaigns that offer financial rewards, bonuses, discounts, free bets or games, odds multipliers or any other form of prize.Rightlander.com said that its new special report will allow operators to quickly identify affiliate pages promoting bonuses alongside an operator’s brand.The report will also locate ‘life changing’ keywords that might be used in affiliate marketing material, including specific terms that imply gambling can change a person’s life by improving either their lifestyle or appearance.In addition, Rightlander.com said operators that opt into the new service will gain access to a list of affiliates sending Spanish traffic to their brand’s non dot.es domains.“Judging from the influx of requests we’ve received this announcement made a sudden and big impact,” Rightlander.com founder Ian Sims said. “Rightlander is ideally positioned to make these sorts of snap decisions as we already have a substantial database of Spanish language affiliate sites that we scan regularly, although, until now that has mainly been for affiliate links to non-ES domains, as per the local regulator’s guidelines.”Media reports in Spain last week said that the government took the decision to limit marketing after the country’s gambling regulator, La Dirección General de Ordenación del Juego, revealed there had been an increase in gambling activity in recent weeks.Spain had already seen its state-owned lottery Sociedad Estatal Loterías y Apuestas del Estado (SELAE) shut down operations. Email Address Marketing & affiliates AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 7th April 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

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Mobile Dashboard – June 2020

first_img Mobile Dashboard – June 2020 Email Address H2 Gambling Capital and iGB are pleased to bring you the June 2020 Mobile Dashboard.The Mobile Dashboard is your monthly overview of the mobile sector in numbers and enables you to follow the evolution of mobile from 2003 with projections up to 2025. As the charts show, mobile gross win has grown strongly since 2003, with revenues from the channel estimated to increase from €22.8bn this year to €42.8bn in 2025, an 88% rise.Mobile’s percentage of overall igaming win has also risen rapidly, particularly over the past five years. H2 predicts the channel will account for 42% of global interactive revenues this year and more than half of global revenues by 2025.However, many operators are already reporting that more than 50% of their revenue comes from the mobile channel, particularly when it comes to sports betting. As the doughnut graph shows, 61% of mobile revenues come from sports betting.By region Europe drives the bulk of global mobile revenues (54%) and also the largest share of its interactive revenues via the mobile channel at 45.1%. H2 Gambling Capital is the gambling industry’s leading consulting, market intelligence and data team. The company has a track record of nearly 15 years focused on the global gambling industry, its projections have been influential in shaping legislators’  and investors’ views of the gambling sector across the globe. 15th June 2020 | By Stephen Carter Casino & games Topics: Casino & games Finance Lottery Sports bettingcenter_img H2 Gambling Capital and iGB are pleased to present your monthly overview of the mobile sector in numbers Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

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Newgioco integrates Oddsmatcher trading system

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Sports betting Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Global sports betting and interactive gaming company Newgioco announced yesterday (17 June) the integration of Oddsmatcher, a new trading system for sports betting, into its Elys Gameboard betting platform. Tags: Online Gambling Global sports betting and interactive gaming company Newgioco announced yesterday (17 June) the integration of Oddsmatcher, a new trading system for sports betting, into its Elys Gameboard betting platform.Through its wholly owned subsidiary Multigioco, Newgioco has entered into an exclusive agreement with developer Guadagno Matematico (GM, translated as ‘Mathematical Gain’).The deal allows Newgioco to integrate GM’s proprietary Oddsmatcher Matched Betting trading system, which is expected to drive customer engagement and activations. The system may also offer players a competitive advantage, it added.The service is expected to go live on 30 June through Newgioco’s network in Italy, in line with the Italian gaming regulator, Agenzia Delle Monopoli’s guidelines.“We are very pleased to have integrated GM’s innovative Oddsmatcher trading system through our Newgioco network in Italy,” said Alessandro Marcelli, Newgioco’s vice preisdent of operations.“GM’s revolutionary system matches odds and bonuses that could provide our customers a competitive advantage by scanning multiple networks and betting exchanges for price efficiency. As we develop the integration of Oddsmatcher within Italy, we believe that we could improve sportsbook margins on our world-class Elys platform and increase customer engagement and activations as we expand internationally.”Newgioco’s chief executive officer, Michele Ciavarella added: “The integration of Oddsmatcher is another key step in our plan to develop Newgioco into one of the most advanced, technology-driven fixed-odds sports betting providers in the world,”“Our Italian operations continue to represent an important proving ground to innovate and apply ground-breaking technologies that work seamlessly for sports betting operators in real-money, regulated markets and that could be applied to our expansion plans in the US market.”Newgioco has been listed on the Nasdaq since January this year, and established Elys Gameboard Technologies earlier this month with a view to expanding its business into the US. The company continues its global expansion, with deals also struck and licenses secured this year in Latin American and African markets. Newgioco integrates Oddsmatcher trading system Topics: Sports betting Tech & innovation Regions: Europe Southern Europe Italy 18th June 2020 | By Conor Mulheirlast_img read more

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Getting serious on affiliate licensing?

first_img With Catena bucking its earlier warnings and flying through the Q2 crisis months with ease, its subsequent comments on affiliate compliance are instructive of how the terms of debate are shifting on licensing of affiliates in GB and elsewhere, writes Scott LongleyFor a sense of how fast things are moving in the online gambling affiliate sector, let’s take a look at Catena Media.A long-term absentee from the debate around affiliate licensing – as least as far as joining the Responsible Affiliates in Gambling (RAiG) industry grouping is concerned – Catena appeared to be facing its own secular existential issues at the start of lockdown.Having pivoted towards the US sports betting market, the fear in mid- to late March among shareholders surrounded what would happen to Catena’s business in the absence of any sport.The company’s share subsequently dived during the general market rout to a low at one point of under SEK7. Such a lowly share price status appeared to spell out imminent doom.Yet, three months on and the worst fears have simply not materialised. Indeed, going by the late July trading statement updating investors on the company’s progress in the second quarter it can be seen that Catena flew through the crisis months with ease.Hitting new all-time high revenue and EBITDA numbers, Catena said it had achieved its “best-ever quarter” in the three months to June. Estimated revenues for the period rose 17% to €27.7m while EBITDA is expected to be up at least 50% to between €14.5m-€14.8m.This is, of course, somewhat in tune with what we know of the experience of operators both in Europe and the US with online casino and other forms of sports betting – table tennis, esports, virtuals – more than picking up the slack from the lack of elite sport to bet on.Yet it still illustrates how the affiliate sector appears to be in rude health – or at least that element of the gambling affiliate world that is both listed and large. It is against this backdrop, then, that we should look at the subject of affiliate licensing and Catena’s comment when questioned as instructive.“Regardless of size all lead generators should ensure that they are compliant,” says a spokesperson. “This may more onerous for smaller companies, but in order to work with the largest operators you have to ensure that what you do meets the relevant market requirements.”Licensing pivot Such assured flat-betting shows the extent to which the ground is shifting on affiliate licensing. Indeed, ahead of a report from the UK’s House of Lords which endorsed that the UK should launch a licensing round for affiliates as part of its upcoming Gambling Act review, RAiG issued a press release declaring its support for the move and thus reversing its previous position.Clive Hawkswood, chief executive at RAiG and hugely experienced in dealing with gambling regulatory issues having led the Remote Gaming Association (RGA) for many years, admits that the change of view was partly driven by an understanding of the direction of travel with affiliates. But more than that, it was also an acknowledgement that licensing was the best way for the sector to achieve its regulatory aims.“Our previous position was that any regulatory gaps should be identified before a final decision was taken by anyone regarding licensing,” he says.“However, over the last few months we have regularly discussed all the arguments for and against. That culminated in the RAiG members deciding that the right way to establish and raise common standards across the whole sector was by way of a licensing or registration regime.”He adds that to take the view that affiliates could sit on the sidelines while the debate over the future of regulation in the UK in particular rages all around was no longer tenable.“It is wrong, and probably dangerous, to leave the future of any rules or regulations to operators or anyone else so I would very much urge all affiliates to get involved in this if they can,” he adds. “A starting point would be for them to look out for any public consultations or calls for evidence.”In the spotlight Those working within the affiliate sector will already be well aware of the extent to which their activities are under scrutiny in the UK. Specifically, in recent weeks the Commission has pinpointed how they think affiliates can play in reducing the amount of gambling advertising seen by children.The Commission’s April update on the industry working groups included among its recommendations that all PPC advertising should only be targeted at people who were 25-plus years old “where platform facilities permit.”Further, the recommendations added that the industry should roll out “to all affiliates a code of conduct which will be amended and updated on a regular basis to ensure all measures undertaken by the industry will be implemented equally by affiliates.”In other words, licensing might as yet be in the future but regulatory compliance is already being imposed on affiliates as it stands. The attempt to get out in front of regulatory change, then, is already behind the pace.“I think that RAiG members see affiliate licensing is the lesser of two evils,” says David Clifton, legal consultant with Clifton Davies. “I believe it was a very clear example of a gambling industry body coming to the conclusion that – before any legislative change is forced upon its members – it is better to make its position clear on a subject that is likely to come up for otherwise contentious debate in the forthcoming UK Government review of the Gambling Act 2005.”In this sense, though some high-profile affiliates have taken to social media to proclaim that affiliates would be mad – or words to that effect – to blandly accept the idea of licensing, there is every indication that for the no-licensing camp the ship has sailed.“My personal view is that licensing is inevitable in the medium term so I might as well build the business model around it,” says Fintan Costello, chief executive and founder at the affiliate BonusFinder.Moreover, he doesn’t believe that licensing will be restricted to the UK. “I believe there will be an arms race among licensing bodies to show they are as tough or tougher than their European neighbours, so eventually it will happen everywhere,” he adds.Welcome developments As was already clear from comments made by now-departed GVC chief executive Kenny Alexander when he was speaking in front of the House of Lords enquiry, the operators would be the ones who will most welcome the moves to license affiliates.“Remember that the responsibility of making sure the affiliate is being compliant is currently with the operators,” says Toby Oddy, founder and chief executive at Digital Fuel “This may be unfair on the operators.”He adds that given the complexities of policing affiliates – a task of attempting to oversee hundreds of thousands of pages – many operators have effectively given up the task and have slimmed down their affiliate programmes accordingly.“This isn’t good for small affiliates in particular as the operators would rather work with a few of the super affiliates (Catena, Bettor Collective, etc) than many smaller affiliates,” he adds. “Providing the process of obtaining a licence isn’t too expensive or difficult then we believe the affiliates, operators and customers can all benefit.”For this very reason, Tom Galanis at TAG Media says he will be recommending a framework that “caters to affiliates of all shapes and sizes.” But he is far from optimistic this will be the outcome.“The reality will be that licensing will cost money and if the UKGC remains true to form, we can expect to see goalposts moved with relative frequency when it comes to licence conditions that perhaps only the bigger affiliates will be able to uphold,” he says.The process of implanting a licensing regime will be instructive. Galanis suggests the Commission will look for help to the operators and their representative body the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC).“They’ll also engage other relevant regulators, such as the ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) and the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office),” he adds. “Then they’ll listen to more evidence from so-called Experts-by-Experience and lastly they’ll hear from an affiliate trade association whose membership sits at the top of the affiliate food chain.”This, he suggests, should “terrify” UK-facing affiliates. “Too many affiliates do not see that this is a fight that has been going on for years – and it extends beyond the UK already,” he says.“It’s time to don the armour, talk with the same voice and deliver a raising of affiliate standards that genuinely protects players and punters around the world, not just balance sheets.”Scott Longley has been a journalist since the early 2000s, covering personal finance, sport and gambling. He has worked for a number of publications including Investment Week, Bloomberg Money, Football First, eGaming Review and Gambling Compliance. Scott now runs his own editorial consultancy, Clear Concise Media, and writes for a number of online and print titles. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address 31st July 2020 | By Stephen Carter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Getting serious on affiliate licensing?center_img Tags: Online Gambling Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Casino & games With Catena bucking its earlier warnings and flying through the Q2 crisis months with ease, its subsequent comments on affiliate compliance are instructive of how the terms of debate are shifting on licensing of affiliates in GB and elsewhere, writes Scott Longleylast_img read more

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Players stake $37.2m in first four weeks of WV igaming

first_img Tags: Mobile Online Gambling AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The first four weeks of legal online casino in West Virginia saw players wager $37.2m on DraftKings’ casino products, resulting in revenue of $824,639, the latest figures from the West Virginia Lottery Commission reveal.The state became the third in which DraftKings rolled out its standalone casino app on 15 July, following launches in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, in partnership with Penn National Gaming’s Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races.This remains the sole legal online casino in the state, with no other operator having followed DraftKings in launching an offering.Players staked $6.9m over the first four days post-launch, on the week to July 17, rising to $9.4m for the seven days to July 25. The best week of the period, for the seven days to August 1, followed with players staking $12.2m, with players then wagering $8.6m in the week ended August 8.That last week, despite a dip in amounts wagered, was the most successful in terms of revenue, with $271,494, the highest seven-day total of the period.Read the full story on iGB North America. 17th August 2020 | By contenteditor The first four weeks of legal online casino in West Virginia saw players wager $37.2m on DraftKings’ casino products, resulting in revenue of $824,639, the latest figures from the West Virginia Lottery Commission reveal. Players stake $37.2m in first four weeks of WV igaming Email Address Topics: Casino & games Finance Regions: US West Virginia Casino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

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