Gallery CoalLaden Water Spills from Adanis Terminal

first_imgImage Courtesy: Dean Sewell/OculiCoal-laden water, which spilled from Australia’s Abbot Point coal terminal, operated by India-based mining company Adani, has reached the neighboring Caley Valley wetlands and covered the adjacent beach.The thick black sludge of coal, which has flowed into the wetland, is smothering a large area, while the adjacent beach now appears to be scattered with lumps of coal, Australia’s environmental agencies informed.“The wetland has turned coal black. It looks trashed. It’s a tragic and shocking picture of what the future of the Reef coast looks like if we don’t stop digging up coal,” Geoff Cousins, Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) President, said.According to the Australian Marine Conservation Society, the coal spill is now at risk of washing out to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, adding even more stress to the crisis-point coral.“The Caley Valley Wetlands today are a microcosm of what could happen to our Great Barrier Reef if the Carmichael mine and port go ahead,” Imogen Zethoven, AMCS Great Barrier Reef Campaign Director, said.The Carmichael thermal coal mine, proposed by Adani Mining, a subsidiary of Adani Group, represents a AUD 16.5 billion investment in the north of the Galilee Basin in Central Queensland, Australia.“If the Reef were a person, it would be crying out for help. In nearly 20 years it has suffered four severe coral bleaching events, 10 severe cyclones and four massive flood events washing huge volumes of pollution into its waters. It can’t take much more,” Zethoven added.The spill, which can release toxic heavy metals into the water including mercury and selenium, comes in the aftermath of Cyclone Debbie which hit Australia’s coast in late March. The cyclone was the strongest tropical cyclone in the Australian region since Cyclone Quang in 2015.World Maritime News Staff; Image Courtesy: Dean Sewell/Oculilast_img read more

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Ratul Puri to stay in ED custody allowed homecooked food

first_imgNew Delhi: A CBI court here on Monday extended the Enforcement Directorate custody of Ratul Puri, relative of Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Kamal Nath, in the AgustaWestland case by three days. The ED counsel said crucial leads have been found from searches at the Hindustan Power, and they have also found an agreement signed by another accused Rajiv Saxena and have to confront Puri with the material they have accessed. They also informed the court of finishing a ‘hash’ value verification pertaining to the 5 TB data which concluded on Sunday. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ Vijay Aggarwal, appearing for Ratul Puri, argued that the court has already granted 11 days of custody. The ED countered, saying that the statements tendered by Puri are “evasive in nature”, and maintained even three days custody is less in view of the “incriminating material” they claim to have found. The ED counsel added that the email ids Puri earlier refused to have any knowledge about have now been corroborated during these searches. Puri’s counsel continued to deny knowledge of the said email ids. He also sought permission to let Puri’s mother meet him in the court premises. CBI Judge Arvind Kumar finally gave the ED three days custody. But in a small respite, the ED hasn’t objected to home-cooked food brought for Puri by his mother during her meeting.last_img read more

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5 GrowthHacking Myths for Software Entrepreneurs

first_img Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. This article is included in Entrepreneur Voices on Growth Hacking, a new book containing insights from more than 20 contributors, entrepreneurs, and thought leaders.”Growth hacking” has become such a popular buzzword — used by so many people (who often know a fair amount about growth but usually very little about hacking) — that certain myths have become attached to the term.These common myths are problematic because they conflate, confuse and practically destroy the proper meaning of “growth hacking” altogether. Below are five you should be especially wary of:Related: How Growth Hacking Is Redefining Marketing1. There is no growth ‘blueprint.’There is no ultimate blueprint, road map, template, checklist or rulebook to growth hacking. While examples such as Airbnb, Uber, Dropbox et. al provide nice case studies to list in blog posts, more often than not, successful growth-hack strategies and tactics work once — and only once.The good news, however, is that there’s no shortage of growth-hacking best practices. You can discover them by perusing articles posted in the Growth Hacking section of Entrepreneur.com, over at GrowthHackers.com or a via a gaggle of recent books on the subject.Bottom line: Growth hacking is as much about attitude (curiosity, playfulness, empiricism) and capability (willingness to code, to get one’s hands dirty, experiment, fail, adapt and reiterate) as it is about replicating the methods already used in specific instances. 2. They will not come just because you built it.While it’s not theoretically impossible for a great software startup to go from zero to infinity on the basis of its organic marketing efforts alone, the odds of this happening materially diminish each day as the massive user platforms (I’m talking about you, Facebook) continue to constrict organic reach in order to attain their own growth metrics.In the early days of the web, it was much easier to build scale, to rank on the front page of Google or just stand out in the feed. Today, do you really expect your world-ruling app to stand out in the app store without some kind of marketing push? Or to dominate Google by “outsourcing your SEO”? I didn’t think so.My point here isn’t that attempting to build products with built-in users isn’t obsolete. But, unless you’ve got some kind of marketing budget in place to strategically push your product, you’ll be running handicapped in a very competitive race. Remember: You’re competing with a wily group of growth hackers!3. Great products don’t sell themselves.This myth, a corollary of Myth 2, is likely an unwanted, unconscious byproduct of the feature-obsessed, engineering focus of so many software startups today. Yes, we know your code is beautiful. But even the best, most innately viral software needs to be discovered; otherwise, the dream of deploying a “perpetual motion conversion machine” will remain in your head.Discovering what will make you discoverable means digging into your data. The uglier it is, the more likely that it will yield insights. Resources include:Website analytics (Google Analytics)Email open/click rates (MailChimp, AWeber)Social and content marketing (Buffer, Buzzsumo)SEO (SEMrush, Moz Open Site Explorer, Yoast)Heat maps, feedback polls, surveys, user session recording (Hotjar, Qualaroo, Inspectlet, ClickTale)Measure this data, analyze what’s working and then optimize. Repeat as necessary.Related: 6 Growth Hack Techniques You Can Try Today4. Growth hacking isn’t ‘black hat.'”Black hat” refers to aggressive, often under-handed SEO strategies. Yet just because your strategies and tactics are incomprehensible to your standard Wharton-educated CMO doesn’t make them disreputably black hat. (If there’s anything truly “black hat” and flat-out illegal, it’s the way Madison Avenue agencies habitually (allegedly) use media rebates from big brand budgets to line their own pockets.Sure, growth hacking often means using legal loopholes (Uber), reverse engineering (SEO), algorithmically generated anti-competitive tactics (Google) and other tactics that may or may not be morally honorable. But these tactics are part and parcel of the envelope-pushing hacker ethos, which doesn’t wait for a tactic to be validated by the establishment before it’s deployed. (By the way, if you’re interested in the color of the hat worn by Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, all I’ll say is it isn’t black).5. It’s not all about acquiring ‘new’ users.Fred Wilson, a veteran New York-based VC who knows a thing or two about startup culture (Wilson’s firm survived the dotcom bust of 2000 very nicely) notes that too many businesses these days are stepping on the gas before they find a proven product-market fit. Instead, Wilson suggests that a company “focus on your 90-day retention numbers and make sure to nail them and prove you have a product market fit. Then scale.”Growth hackers know that existing users are always the best place to look for new users. Uber’s strategy reflects this stance perfectly. It’s all about personal referrals, word of mouth and unpaid referrals. Put another way, “Leaky buckets don’t need more water, they need their holes fixed.” Which means that a lot of growth hacking isn’t that radical or revolutionary: It’s about paying attention to what your best customers want — and giving them more, so they’ll serve as trusted, reliable PR mouthpieces.Do the work.Andrew Chen — one of the first to really define growth hacking — suggests that action and experimentation lie at the essence of the term. Unless you’re actively probing, testing, learning, optimizing and failing, you’re just “talking the talk.”Chen put it nicely in a recent Reddit “Ask Me Anything” session. “People,” he wrote, “are getting all their knowledge about growth from reading blogs, rather than actually doing the work, running the experiments and building great products.” I couldn’t have said it better.Related: Why Growth Hacking Won’t Work for Every Company Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. January 5, 2016 6 min readlast_img read more

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TravelBrands July 16 donation day for SickKids Foundation a tremendous success

first_img MISSISSAUGA — On July 16 TravelBrands donated one per cent of all sales made to the SickKids Foundation and now the company is thanking all the clients, partners, travel agents and suppliers who made the day a success.Frank DeMarinis, CEO, TravelBrands, says: “Our goal was to bring the travel community together to raise awareness and funds for a great cause and I believe it was surpassed. It brings me great pride that we can all come together to give back to SickKids. Our third annual donation day is just another step in supporting the advancement of children’s healthcare.”This year, all proceeds will be contributed towards the SickKids Foundation and Cardiac Operating Room. TravelBrands’ donation supports SickKids’ aspiration of being the leading pediatric and congenital heart disease centre in the world.In addition to donating a percentage of sales, TravelBrands hosts multiple events year-round to raise awareness and funds for SickKids, including the annual TravelBrands Charity Golf Classic, participation in the Mississauga Dragon Boat Race Festival and a 5km employee walk.More news:  Save the dates! Goway’s Africa Roadshow is backDeMarinis says travel agents can continue donating their Loyalty Rewards points to the SickKids Foundation, and that any Loyalty Rewards donation made between July 16 and Aug. 31, 2019 will be matched by TravelBrands. To donate Loyalty Rewards see travelbrandsaccess.com. << Previous PostNext Post >> Thursday, July 18, 2019 Travelweek Group Posted bylast_img read more

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