Eminate tests blade-coating in bakeries

first_imgFood and pharmacuetical solutions company Eminate, has developed Endurocut, a food-safe, kosher certified, premium blade-coating technology that claims to extend the life of cutting blades by as much as 10 times.The company said this improved performance can help reduce equipment downtime, potentially leading to further cost savings.The inert, ultra-hard, ultra-thin coating enhances the surface properties of cutting blades maintaining the quality of their cut and extending the overall life of the blade, said Eminate. The food-safe coating system has recently been trialled by a number of leading UK bakeries. “We have been extremely pleased with the results that Endurocut has achieved in recent bakery trials, demonstrating significant blade life extension and reducing machinery downtime and consumable costs for the manufacturer,” said technical development manager Dr Nick Botterill.last_img read more

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Watch Fruition Rally The Home Crowd At Northwest String Summit [Videos]

first_imgFruition was playing with a loaded deck during their back-to-back days of jamming at the Northwest String Summit. Both days, the crowd was packed with fans of the Portland-based band, many of whom have watched these five friends grow from street buskers to a nationally touring act that regularly sells out rooms across the country. It says a lot about the dedication of Fruition’s fan base to see a crowd locked arm-in-arm, singing along to every song ’til the sound man pulls the plug for two days in a row.Watch Fruition Perform “Boil Over” At Last Year’s Northwest String Summit [Pro-Shot]The songwriting duties are shared by the front line of mandolin and guitar maven Mimi Naja, the frenetic fretwork of Jay Cobb Anderson, and the keys and guitar offerings of Kellen Asebroek. However, Naja, Anderson, and Asebroek would be little if not for the rock solid foundation laid down by drummer Tyler Thompson and bassist Jeff Leonard. Watching such strong-willed, creative individuals play with such respect to the styles and song space of their partners is truly a wonderful thing, and the audience responds in kind.Fruition Bares Their Hearts And Souls On A Monday Night In Bloomington [Videos/Full Audio]Known for their breathlessly honest music, wild stage energy, and relentless good cheer, Fruition can find a ray of hope in even the most heartbreaking of subject matters. That attitude, along with their musicianship and songwriting prowess, is what won them the die-hard fans who packed the front of the main stage on Thursday the at the Northwest String Summit. However, Thursday’s set was nothing compared to their night-closing performance in the sweltering Kinfolk tent. Our own Rex Thomson was on hand for all the fun and has put together a collection of some of the best moments from Fruition’s two stellar sets. You can check out the videos below!“Santa Fe”“The Meaning”“Way That I Do”“Wasting Away-Blue Light”“That’s Just Love Sneaking Up On You”“There She Was”“All Apologies”“Misty Night”last_img read more

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Mobile access: How credit unions can effectively reach underbanked

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Almost 70 million Americans are currently outside, or at least not fully in, the U.S. financial system. Of those Americans, 51 million are underbanked—meaning they supplement their traditional bank accounts with alternative financial services such as payday loans and money orders.To help community financial institutions (FIs) better connect with the underbanked, a recent Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) report suggests mobile banking apps may be the way to go. The FDIC found 75 percent of underbanked Americans have access to smartphones, making them prime targets for mobile banking options.Based on its research, the FDIC determined six ways mobile banking helps FIs better meet the financial needs of the underbanked: continue reading »last_img read more

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Gold Coast real estate agents spreading Easter cheer

first_imgRay White Broadbeach agent Jamie Harrison gives out hot cross buns to his clients. Ray White Broadbeach agent Jamie Harrison gave out 130 hot cross buns to his clients today.A GOLD Coast real estate agent is spreading Easter cheer in the form of hot cross buns.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North9 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoRay White Broadbeach agent Jamie Harrison delivered 130 “special Ray White coloured” hot cross buns to his clients today.“Everyone loves them as it’s so unique and they have a yellow cross on top,” he said.“It’s just a fantastic relationship builder.“I’m always looking for innovative ways to stand out within the market.”last_img

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Old forage gets a new life

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A forgotten forage grass imported from Europe in the 1800s could soon be helping to boost cattle and dairy production. The grass, which has adapted well to parts of the Upper Midwest, has been released by U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Resarch Service scientists in Madison, Wisconsin.The forage grass was discovered on a farmer’s shaded hilltop in a long-time pasture that had never been seeded with commercial forages. Cattle thrived on it and it gradually spread from the hilltop grove into gullies and open areas, possibly because cattle eating the ripe seed spread it in their manure. The farmer fed hay made from it to more cattle, to spread it further. He also eventually began consulting with ARS plant geneticist Michael Casler and his colleagues at the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center.Casler and his colleagues have since spent more than a decade evaluating the grass, named Hidden Valley for the farm where it was discovered. In field trials and other tests, they evaluated how cattle respond to it and how well it grows in a variety of locations. They found that it produces a 9% lower yield than orchardgrass and tall fescue, but has a 9% higher rate of neutral detergent fiber digestibility. That means cattle digest it more easily and eat more of it, in turn gaining more weight and producing more milk. Research also shows that it has adapted to the Upper Mississippi River Basin by developing several desirable traits. It is drought tolerant and will survive freezing temperatures and repeated grazing.DNA tests show it to be a meadow fescue brought to the United States by European settlers in the 1800s. By the 1950s, meadow fescues had largely been replaced with higher yielding tall fescues and other grasses. But they never completely disappeared as forages. A movement toward managed grazing operations in the 1980s prompted renewed interest in them, and ARS researchers and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin evaluated 91 varieties in extensive field trials, including seven European varieties, on three Wisconsin dairy farms. But Hidden Valley stands out, according to Casler.“What was originally found on this farm is really remarkable,” he said.Like other meadow fescues, it has an endophyte (symbiotic fungus) that gives it some degree of environmental protection. But it does not produce the compounds found in tall fescue that can sometimes harm cattle.Surveys of the Upper Midwest “Driftless Region,” which includes parts of Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota, also show that it can be found in a wide range of habitats and seems to grow well on land taken out of crop production and allowed to revert to pasture.Casler released Hidden Valley in June 2014, publishing an announcement in the Journal of Plant Registrations, and seed is available through the National Plant Germplasm System.last_img read more

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In and around your city

first_imgA checklist on where to eat and what to shop for.Event Saputara Monsoon FestivalWhile the rest of the country is steeped in drought, Saputara has been flourishing, having received its fair share of rainfall. To celebrate the rains, the monsoon festival will be held this season. An expansive tent is,A checklist on where to eat and what to shop for.EventSaputara Monsoon FestivalWhile the rest of the country is steeped in drought, Saputara has been flourishing, having received its fair share of rainfall. To celebrate the rains, the monsoon festival will be held this season. An expansive tent is to be set up to display tribal art, photography from the region and also host a Warli painting competition. Apart from this, a range of adventure sports activities will also be organized. The event is being put together by Tourism Corporation of Gujarat Ltd (TCGL) and visitors heading to Saputara can avail a TCGL tourist package. The package is all inclusive and apart from monsoon festival related events, it will also include visits to the Mahal forest, Shabri Dham, Vaghai botanical garden, Girmal falls and Vansada. Visit gujarattourism.com for more details about the monsoon festival.Ongoing till: September 1.Price: Rs 450 for a one day tour; Rs 3500 for three day long tour packages.Where: Valsad Railway station which is about 384 kms from Ahmedabad.ArtArt on EMIThe Marvel Art Gallery will now be selling works by legendary artists on a payment model of EMIs (Every Month Instalment), thus making it much easier for the common man to get his hands on great art. Among their collection are masterpieces by the likes of MF Husain, Akbar Padamsee and SH Raza apart from works by various artists including Haku Shah, Shanti Dave, Manoj Kachangal, Bansi Khatri and Harshil Patel.Where: Marvel Art GalleryPvt.Ltd, Shapath I and II SG Road.Tel: 079 26870256.RestaurantadvertisementGlobal PlatterSoftly lit interiors with groovy jazz playing in the background set the mood at this latest entrant to the cafe scene in Ahmedabad, Turquoise Villa. This cafe opened in May and since then has been slowly yet surely becoming a favourite evening haunt for many Amdavadis. The cafe is designed to please with its turquoise blue and pearl white theme that might remind you of a villa you saw on a Greek isle. The seating space here is tastefully done with a mix of king size sofas and low rise chairs. The outdoor seating area is highly recommended on a pleasant day and is sure to set the scene for many lovely dinner dates.Their menu, despite being vegetarian, is a mishmash of global influences fusing many diverse tastes into one. Here you’ll find street food ranging from Delhi’s Chandni Chowk chaat specialities to New York style pizzas, from Latin American street food delights such as empanadas and tacos to Indonesian nasi goreng, or from a French creme brule to our very own Mumbaiya gola. A perfect example of fusion food can also be seen in the pav-bhaji fondue which is a hot seller here. Have the local Manek Chowk chilla chaat or perfectly done mezze and egg crepes. The jasmine iced tea is a great thirst quencher that goes well with any of their dishes.Average meal for two: Rs 300 to Rs 500.Where: Center Point, Panchvati, Ahmedabad.Tel: 079 40373000.last_img read more

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Netflix deal doesnt solve real cultural issues

first_imgAs the fury over a sweetheart deal for Netflix rages, one thing it has exposed is how unwilling the Liberals are to address the hard issues affecting Canadian cultural policies – apparently as unwilling as their Conservative predecessors.When Quebec vowed this week to go it alone in an attempt to get Netflix to collect provincial sales tax, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau repeated his commitment to let the American streaming service continue to escape the GST – because to do otherwise would raise taxes on the middle class. That kind of populist if nonsensical position – if middle-class Canadians chose to buy new services, why should we not pay existing taxes on them? – was the hallmark of Stephen Harper’s refusal to engage on the issue.Another tricky question that Minister of Canadian Heritage Mélanie Joly never even raises in the 38-page report, titled Creative Canada, is that of foreign ownership. Canada has a series of laws and policies that prevent foreign control in a wide range of cultural activities from broadcasting television programming to selling books and distributing movies. (Canada is not alone in thinking like this; many countries, including the United States, have traditionally kept foreigners from buying their broadcasting networks.) Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The notion has always been that Canadian control promotes Canadian content, although the relationship is not always that direct and depends more on a producers’ economic interests than patriotism: Foreign-owned companies can make money publishing Canadian books, for example, while the business model for Canadian broadcasters relies heavily on U.S. shows.Still, the scandalous Netflix deal does support one argument often made in favour of national ownership: It’s easier to get Canadian companies to play by Canadian rules. (Apparently in exchange for escaping any taxes, Netflix made a commitment to spend $500-million in production in Canada over five years, a sum that seems to represent what it would have been spending already and can include U.S. productions that are merely shooting in Canada.)READ MORE Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

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San Diego homeless count decreases

first_imgSan Diego homeless count decreases 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings“Homelessness is a complex issue but efforts to collect information directly from San Diegans experiencing homelessness will provide the precise, actionable information needed to better set polices, direct funding, and inform the public,” said task force CEO Tamera Kohler.The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development requires that cities receiving federal funding to combat homelessness complete the Point-In-Time Count each year. The county received roughly $20 million in federal funding as a result of last year’s survey.The task force collected data for the latest count, known locally as the WeAllCount survey, during the early morning hours of Jan. 25. For this year’s survey, the task force’s more than 1,5000 volunteers used a new methodology to ensure a count that’s as accurate as possible. Volunteers not only counted homeless residents throughout the county, but also interviewed them on-site to gauge their needs and priorities, allowing county and local homeless advocacy groups to better assist homeless residents.Volunteers also changed how they counted residents living in vehicles or temporary shelters such as tents. In previous years, surveyors multiplied each observed vehicle or shelter by two to estimate the number of residents living in their cars or a makeshift shelter.For this year’s count, the task force counted each resident who was engaged or visibly seen by surveyors regardless of the type of shelter they lived in. Homeless residents who were observed living in vehicles or tents or on sidewalks and park benches were designated unsheltered for the purposes of the survey.“The improved methods used focus on direct, consistent engagement with homeless San Diegans and align us with nationally recognized best-practices,” said San Diego City Councilman Chris Ward, who chairs the task force. “This improved outreach methodology sets the tone for formalizing and standardizing a qualified outreach protocol for use throughout the county.”The bulk of the county’s homeless population, 5,082 residents, live in the city of San Diego, according to the survey. More than 1,000 homeless residents live in east county cities like El Cajon, La Mesa and Santee while several hundred each live in south county, the coastal areas of north county and the inland sections of north county.In all areas surveyed, unsheltered residents outnumbered sheltered homeless residents. One-tenth of survey participants are veterans, according to the task force, while 62 percent of sheltered residents and 73 percent of unsheltered homeless residents are men.“As we look beyond the numbers, we know that each person experiencing homelessness has a unique story and needs a unique combination of housing and services in order to achieve stability,” said Deacon Jim Vargas, president and CEO of Father Joe’s Villages and the task force’s secretary. “A comprehensive plan that spans the region will be necessary to effectively and efficiently deploy adequate resources.” 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (CNS) – San Diego County’s homeless population remains above 8,000 but is down roughly 11 percent from 2017, according to the results of the latest count released today by the San Diego Regional Task Force on the Homeless.The task force’s 2019 Point-In-Time Count survey put that the county’s homeless population total at 8,102, down from both last year’s observed total of 8,576 and the 2017 total of 9,116.The total of sheltered homeless residents remained fairly stagnant at 3,626, while the county’s population of unsheltered residents fell from 4,990 last year to 4,476 this year. According to task force data, 78 percent of those surveyed said they first became homeless in San Diego.Councilmember Chris Ward joined Good Morning San Diego to discuss the point in time count for homeless. Posted: April 29, 2019 KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter April 29, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 7:25 AMlast_img read more

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