Spring games nothing more than glorified practices

One of the hardest sporting events to draw conclusions from is a college football spring game.If a player breaks a 70-yard touchdown run or intercepts two passes, he’s pegged as a breakout star for the fall. Ohio State’s Spring Game was no different.Redshirt freshman quarterback Kenny Guiton was the media darling of the postgame interviews following his 167-yard, two-touchdown performance.In last year’s Spring Game, Terrelle Pryor’s strong performance riled up Buckeye fans, giving them dreams of the second coming of Troy Smith. Then the regular season commenced, and Pryor struggled through the year up until his MVP performance in the Rose Bowl.In Saturday’s game, there were times when Terrelle Pryor looked like Randall Cunningham, and then there were times when he channeled his inner Akili Smith. He was told not to scramble. Thus, it’s impossible to make sense of his performance at all.The defenses dominated the game for the most part. Ben Buchanan and Derek Erwin punted a combined 13 times. Tresselball in April anyone?The Spring Game is a lot like the NFL Draft. The beginning is filled with excitement and anticipation. But in the end, the game never measures up to the hype, and the media coverage is overblown.After the game, I hinted to junior wide receiver Dane Sanzenbacher that we in the media tend to put a lot of emphasis on the Spring Game, and he smiled in agreement.“Yes, you guys certainly do,” Sanzenbacher said.He added that the players are basically just trying to enjoy themselves during the game.“For us, it’s more fun than anything,” Sanzenbacher said. “We’ve been working hard the past 14 days, too.”Usually a good indicator of how the game will go is to take note of the weather forecast. Last year, 95,722 watched the Gray defeat the Scarlet 23-3 in a game that featured a handful of exciting plays and essentially perfect spring weather.The best word to describe the weather on Saturday would be mediocre. It was going to rain at some point during the game, and it arrived at halftime. When the downpour was over, the stadium looked like a Jacksonville Jaguars home game as the announced crowd of 65,223 had mostly filed out.The excitement didn’t arrive until late in the fourth quarter, when Guiton threw a beauty of a pass to junior receiver Taurian Washington to put the Gray up for good, 17-14.All in all, the game was mundane, which describes plenty of OSU games in recent memory. But in reality, that’s probably how it should be. The only difference between a normal spring practice and the Spring Game for Tressel’s crew is that the Spring Game is played in the Horseshoe.That’s the point. This game doesn’t mean anything. It’s an overhyped scrimmage that the media has fallen in love with, and expects too much of.On the other hand, sports fans have spoken, and they want to see as much football as possible. Nothing says success like excess. read more

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NCAA hits Ohio State with 1year bowl ban loss of scholarships

The Ohio State football program has received a one-year postseason ban for the 2012 season and a loss of scholarships from the NCAA Committee of Infractions. According to a report from The Columbus Dispatch, the Buckeyes will be allowed to play in the Gator Bowl against the University of Florida on Jan. 2, but will forfeit postseason eligibility next season, which would include a possible berth in the Big Ten Football Championship Game and a bowl game.  OSU will also face a reduction of four scholarships over the next three years in addition to the five scholarships the school already forfeited over that time period, according to the report. The NCAA has added an another year of probation the the football program’s self-imposed two-year probation. Former OSU coach Jim Tressel has been handed a five-year “show cause” penalty for his role in the violations meaning any program that attempts to hire him in the next five years could face NCAA sanctions. The penalties stem from a series of NCAA violations the OSU football program committed dating back to December 2010 when OSU became mired in a scandal involving players receiving improper benefits including discounts on tattoos.  The Buckeyes are scheduled to play Jan. 2 in the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla., where the team will play Florida. read more

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The New Laptops

first_img Laptop computer screens that flip around to become tablet PCs could be an increasingly common sight near future. Convertibles, as they are called, are the newest and hottest – but not the only – offering in the increasingly diverse laptop market.A convertible is more than just a laptop with a swiveling screen. The screen also accepts input from a pen just like a PDA – Personal Digital Assistant – or dedicated tablet PC.Convertibles have given laptops a dual personality – use it normally or flip the screen around and snap it down on top of the keyboard to make a full-fledged table PC. Another cool feature: if you’re trying to show somebody what’s on the screen, you simply swivel it towards them – great for presentations. With all these cool features, why doesn’t everyone own a convertible? Price mostly – they can cost several hundred dollars more than a standard laptop. Experts predict this will change as more people buy them – economy of scale. On top of that, laptop prices have literally crashed in the last 5 years making them affordable replacements for desktops.Slate-style tablet laptops – the screen is fixed on top of the unit – are less popular, but widely praised by a select group of die hard scribblers. These units are akin to a PDA, only larger – the dimensions of a standard pad letter-sized of paper – and work in much the same manner. Table PCs have been around for about 15 years, but sales have always been just a few percent of the total laptop market. To type, you need an external keyboard. Most people prefer typing to writing and – even today – handwriting recognition software leaves something to be desired. Most require a new writing style or a “learning” process. Unlike underpowered PDAs, tablet PCs are full-fledged computers capable of running any Windows program. They also cost several hundred dollars less than convertibles and have been on the market longer. Lack of a swiveling screen makes them more robust and lighter, as well, according to proponents.Another segment in growth is that of the ruggedized laptops. They are attractive to anybody who’s ever dropped or banged an expensive laptop causing permanent damage. Ouch, and get out that wallet: just the screen alone could cost $1000 to replace. Explore further Full sized tablet PC – Motion Computing LE1600 8.5” x 11”, 3.13 lbs. Multi-mobile (M2) computing system makes Android, iOS apps sharable on multiple devices Terralogic Toughnote Series 3. It’s not your parent’s laptop: new models offer a wide range of different configurations for every need and taste.center_img Citation: The New Laptops (2006, January 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-01-laptops.html Rugged models tend to run a couple pounds heavier than normal laptops, but you can leave that protective carrying case at home. They resist shocks, water and dust and offer all the features a normal user would need. In fact, they are practically indestructible: Depending on the make & model, think 30 minutes of heavy rain, 40,000 feet of altitude, 40G shocks, dust storms, saltwater mist, 70 degrees centigrade, 95% condensing humidity and enough vibration to shake a truck apart. They even have nuclear battlefield models for the military designed to withstand the EMP – ElectroMagnetic Pulse – created by nuclear explosions. This pulse destroys unprotected electronics. IBM ThinkPad X41 Tablet – a popular, light (3.5 lbs.) 12″ convertible. The SUV of notebooks is as heavy in the hands as on your pocketbook, however – models start around $3,000. Also, you should be prepared to accept last year’s technology at least – many still come standard with Pentium III processors and Windows 98SE.Manufacturing prices are dropping, however, and shipments of convertible, ruggedized and slate PCs may hit over 9 million units by 2008. That’s up 700 percent from the 1.2 million units expected to ship this year, according to a forecast by market researchers. Convertible notebooks are expected to make up the majority of those shipments. The projected number of convertibles and tablets is small compared with the overall number of notebooks – 62.5 million notebooks ship yearly, a number that is forecast by market analysts IDC to climb to 100.3 million in 2008. Microsoft, a major backer of tablets, is making the rounds with educators and developers to promote the benefits of tablet-based computing. Windows XP Tablet PC Edition 2005 is currently available with the purchase of a tablet-style PC. Users can also get free upgrades at the Microsoft’s web site. The next Tablet OS version is slated to be part of the upcoming Windows Vista Home Premium Edition. The Premium version, which is based on Vista Home Basic, is similar to the Windows XP Media Center Edition (XP MCE) but adds features designed for tablet PCs such as improved handwriting recognition and ability to use a tablet’s stylus to pan through documents.Only time will tell if these new laptops will flourish like wireless networking or fade away like floppy disks. But in an increasingly tight high-tech market were margins are low and profits are down, expect PC makers to pull out all the stops. They will introduce new and interesting additions to their offerings in a bid to rise above the competition. Who knows? Maybe one day we will all own a rugged, convertible notebook.Before tossing your desktop to get a sexy, new convertible, remember: you will have to make some sacrifices: Greater expense, shorter useful life – the technology tends to be several months behind the most advanced desktops, virtually no upgrade path apart from more memory and lower overall performance – especially when it comes to games.But, hey, everyone loves a convertible, right?By Philip Dunn, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Nick Giambruno and Ron Paul The speech is titled

first_img Nick Giambruno and Ron Paul The speech is titled “The End of Dollar Hegemony” and discussed the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system—which most people know about—and the de facto system that replaced it—which most people do not know about. This speech is an absolute must-view you can watch it or read a transcript of it. The most important part of the speech is when Paul discusses the petrodollar system, a primary factor in maintaining the dollar’s role as the world’s premier currency after the breakdown of Bretton Woods. “It all ended on August 15, 1971, when Nixon closed the gold window and refused to pay out any of our remaining 280 million ounces of gold. In essence, we declared our insolvency and everyone recognized some other monetary system had to be devised in order to bring stability to the markets. Amazingly, a new system was devised which allowed the US to operate the printing presses for the world reserve currency with no restraints placed on it—not even a pretense of gold convertibility, none whatsoever! Though the new policy was even more deeply flawed, it nevertheless opened the door for dollar hegemony to spread. Realizing the world was embarking on something new and mind-boggling, elite money managers, with especially strong support from US authorities, struck an agreement with OPEC to price oil in US dollars exclusively for all worldwide transactions. This gave the dollar a special place among world currencies and in essence “backed” the dollar with oil. In return, the US promised to protect the various oil-rich kingdoms in the Persian Gulf against threat of invasion or domestic coup. This arrangement helped ignite the radical Islamic movement (Al Qaeda) among those who resented our influence in the region. The arrangement gave the dollar artificial strength, with tremendous financial benefits for the United States. It allowed us to export our monetary inflation by buying oil and other goods at a great discount as dollar influence flourished. This post-Bretton Woods system was much more fragile than the system that existed between 1945 and 1971. Though the dollar/oil arrangement was helpful, it was not nearly as stable as the pseudo-gold standard under Bretton Woods. It certainly was less stable than the gold standard of the late 19th century. The agreement with OPEC in the 1970s to price oil in dollars has provided tremendous artificial strength to the dollar as the preeminent reserve currency. This has created a universal demand for the dollar, and soaks up the huge number of new dollars generated each year. Using force to compel people to accept money without real value can only work in the short run. It ultimately leads to economic dislocation, both domestic and international, and always ends with a price to be paid. The economic law that honest exchange demands only things of real value as currency cannot be repealed. The chaos that one day will ensue from our 35-year experiment with worldwide fiat money will require a return to money of real value. We will know that day is approaching when oil-producing countries demand gold, or its equivalent, for their oil rather than dollars or euros. The sooner the better.” Ron Paul told me that although this speech is relatively unknown in the US, it was widely received around the world. As we discussed the implications of these issues, Paul said that the premise of this speech still applies today. I believe that once the dollar loses its status as the world’s premier reserve, the US will start to implement the destructive measures we frequently discuss: capital controls, people controls, price controls, currency devaluations, confiscations, nationalizing pensions, etc. Such things have happened recently in Poland, Cyprus, Iceland, Argentina, Zimbabwe, Venezuela, and a number of other countries. Take a glance at history and you will quickly notice these measures are the norm when a government gets into serious fiscal trouble. Many nations have made the mistake of thinking they were somehow “exceptional” and that these kinds of things couldn’t happen to them. There is no question the US is and will continue to be in serious fiscal trouble unless it implements drastic (and politically impossible) changes. The only saving grace for the US has been its ability to print the world’s reserve currency. But once that special privilege is lost, it will revert to the measures all other governments throughout history have taken. You absolutely want to be internationalized before the US dollar loses its status as the world’s premier reserve currency. I truly believe the window opportunity to take protective action will slam shut at that time. Internationalization is just one of several timely topics touched on by the experts who gathered at the 2013 Casey Summit, 3 Days with Casey. Unusually, most speakers stayed after their presentations to mingle with attendees and listen to others’ talks—which speaks volumes as to the quality of the conference. If you missed out—or even if you were fortunate enough to be in attendance for Ron Paul’s keynote address, plus presentations by Lacy Hunt, Catherine Austin Fitts, Chris Martenson, and many others, not to mention the Casey Brain Trust led by Doug Casey himself—you can still hear it all. Every presentation. Every breakout session. Every Q&A. All of it—including speakers’ visual aids, if used—will be available on the 2013 Summit Audio Collection. That’s over 27 hours of insight, analysis, speculation, discussion, recommendations… and much more. And you can get a substantial discount by ordering today. Click here to learn more and reserve your CD or MP3 copy of the 2013 Summit Audio Collection. I spent the past weekend in Tucson for the Casey Research 2013 Summit, indeed a memorable and information-packed experience. It was truly a pleasure to meet with everyone who joined us. Notably, it was extremely encouraging to meet so many intelligent people who had taken concrete steps to internationalize their savings and obtain a second passport—and thus reducing their exposure to whatever happens in their home countries. Doug Casey kicked things off with a look at the striking parallels between the rise and fall of Rome and the rise and fall of the US. In a way, Doug reminded me of the video below, which I stumbled across recently and which I highly recommend that you view. It shows, in a little over three minutes, how the borders of Europe have changed over the past 1,000 years. It is an amazing and concise illustration of how, contrary to popular opinion, the borders of political entities are anything but permanent. In a historical perspective, nations and national boundaries tend to have as much permanence as a double cheeseburger placed in front of Chris Christie. It is for this reason (and many others) that I believe you should internationalize various aspects of your life and not totally bind your future to any particular nation-state. At the Summit I also had the chance to do something that I had wanted to do for a long time—sit down with Ron Paul for an informal (but in-depth) discussion on what I believe to be his most important speech. It is a speech that many, even most libertarians, have never heard. This is because it occurred in 2006, before Ron had really broken through on the national level, and during an otherwise dull session of Congress.last_img read more

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