Adjunct Faculty- French

first_imgDescription/Job SummaryOverview of position: Summary of position’sresponsibilities Master’s Degree in foreign languages, specifically inFrench2 years of teaching experience in the field of study –FrenchPreferred QualificationsPreferred Qualifications: Create and develop assignments, tests, and quizzes thatencourage and permit the measurement of assessment in studentlearning outcomes and objectivesFacilitate instruction that may encompass different levels oflearning and differentiationMeet all assigned classes on time and be available for studentsfor supportFollow procedures regarding the submission of mid-term, finalgrade and all other registrar deadlinesUse current technology to enhance the effectiveness of theteaching and learning processPrepare, administer, and grade assignments and exams in atimely manner to inform students on their progressProvide a safe environment for studentsAssess student engagement/understanding during each classsessionAssess and monitor student progress and understandingthroughout the courseRemediate students’ lack of prerequisite knowledgeOffer content help through various meansSelect course materials as they reflect the MasterSyllabusPlace the syllabus, readings, and homework on CanvasRequired QualificationsMinimum Qualifications:center_img 4 years of teaching French in higher educationcommunity college teaching experiencelast_img read more

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Pancreas on a chip

first_img Related Combination of radiation, chemo, and blood-pressure drug losartan extends patient survival Novel protocol improves pancreatic cancer outcomes By combining two powerful technologies, scientists are taking diabetes research to a whole new level. In a study led by Harvard University’s Kevin Kit Parker and published in the journal Lab on a Chip on Aug. 29, microfluidics and human, insulin-producing beta cells have been integrated in an islet-on-a-chip. The new device makes it easier for scientists to screen insulin-producing cells before transplanting them into a patient, test insulin-stimulating compounds, and study the fundamental biology of diabetes.The design of the islet-on-a-chip was inspired by the human pancreas, in which islands of cells (“islets”) receive a continuous stream of information about glucose levels from the bloodstream and adjust their insulin production as needed.“If we want to cure diabetes, we have to restore a person’s own ability to make and deliver insulin,” explained Douglas Melton, the Xander University Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI). “Beta cells, which are made in the pancreas, have the job of measuring sugar and secreting insulin, and normally they do this very well. But in diabetes patients these cells can’t function properly. Now, we can use stem cells to make healthy beta cells for them. But like all transplants, there is a lot involved in making sure that can work safely.”Before transplanting beta cells into a patient, they must be tested to see whether they are functioning properly. The current method for doing this is based on technology from the 1970s: giving the cells glucose to elicit an insulin response, collecting samples, adding reagents, and taking measurements to see how much insulin is present in each one. The manual process takes so long to run and interpret that many clinicians give up on it altogether.The new, automated, miniature device gives results in real time, which can speed up clinical decision-making.“Our device arranges islets into separate lines, delivers a pulse of glucose to each one simultaneously, and detects how much insulin is produced,” said Aaron Glieberman, co-first author on the paper and a Ph.D. candidate in the Parker lab. “It couples glucose stimulation and insulin detection in the same flow path, so it can give a clinician actionable information, quickly. The design also uses materials that are amenable to larger-scale manufacturing, which means more people will be able to use it.”“The islet-on-a-chip lets us monitor how donated or manufactured islet cells are releasing insulin, as cells in the body can,” said Parker, the Tarr Family Professor of Bioengineering and Applied Physics at Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, core member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and principal faculty member of HSCI.“That means we can make serious headway toward cell therapies for diabetes. The device makes it easier to screen drugs that stimulate insulin secretion, test stem-cell-derived beta cells, and study the fundamental biology of islets. There is no other quality-control technology out there that can do it as fast, and as accurately.”Harvard’s Office of Technology Development has filed patent applications relating to this technology and is actively exploring commercialization opportunities.“It was exciting to see our lab’s method for measuring islet function taken forward from individual islets to much bigger groups of islets, and incorporated into a device that can be used widely in the community,” said co-author Michael Roper of Florida State University, whose lab focuses on the fundamental biology of islets. “Now, we have a device that integrates glucose delivery, islet positioning and capture, reagent mixing, and insulin detection, and requires far fewer reagents. So labs can use it to do more experiments at the same cost, using a much shorter and easier process.”“My main interest is in diabetes itself — all the adults in my family have Type 2 diabetes, and that is the reason I’ve pursued science as a career,” said Benjamin Pope, co-first author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in the Parker lab. “I am really excited about seeing this technology used in diabetes research and transplantation screening, because it enables cellular therapies for diabetes.“It’s also a beautiful integration of many different technologies,” Pope added. “The physics behind the automatic islet trapping, the microfluidics, the real-time sensor and the biochemistry that underlies it, the electronics and data acquisition components — even the software. The overall device and operation system — integrating so many things from different fields, I learned a ton in the process.” Aside from its application to diabetes, the device has promise for use with other tissues and organs. “We can modify the core technology to sense function in a range of microphysiological systems,” said Glieberman. “With the ability to detect cell secretions continuously, we want to make it easier to explore how cells use protein signals to communicate. This technology may eventually develop new insights into dynamic metrics of health for both diagnostics and treatment.”This study was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (awards UC4 DK104165, UC4 DK116283, RO1 DK080714), Harvard’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (grant no. DMR-690 1420570) and the Harvard Center for Nanoscale Systems (National Science Foundation award 1541959), and the Life Sciences Research Foundation. Harvard-led research boosts the yield of insulin-producing cells for diabetes therapy Improving cell therapy for diabeteslast_img read more

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Lewis Hamilton blames F1 career for split with Nicole Scherzinger

first_img 10 months ago Lewis Hamilton: F1 champ’s salary revealed by his former teammate Written By 9 months ago Lewis Hamilton puts Mercedes jacket over grid girl in small act of kindness; Watch 10 months ago Lewis Hamilton vs Michael Schumacher: In a league of their own As quoted in British media, Hamilton about holding down on a relationship, Hamilton said that It’s similar with most sportsmen and women as they are travelling most of the time and it becomes difficult to maintain a work-life balance. So that’s probably an additional weight that makes it really, really tough to hold down a good relationship.Also Read: Lewis Hamilton: F1 Champ’s Salary Revealed By His Former TeammateAfter splitting with Nicole Scherzinger, Lewis Hamilton’s career on track went from strength to strength with the Brit winning the world title in five of the last six years with the first coming in 2008.F1: Lewis Hamilton relationship rumoursAfter the breakup, Lewis Hamilton has been linked with the likes of Rita Ora, Kendall Jenner and Rihanna, but he says that ultimately, it’s all about wanting to be 100 per cent committed because you never want to be any less committed than the person next to you.Also Read: Lewis Hamilton To Have Contract Renewal Talks With Mercedes Amidst Ferrari RumoursHe also added that there’s only a certain amount of you as a whole that you can give to everything. It depends on how much of a sacrifice you want to make.Also Read: Max Verstappen Vs Lewis Hamilton: Latest Feud Could Spark New RivalryLewis Hamilton will be next seen in year-ending Abu Dhabi Grand Prix having wrapped up his sixth World crown in Austin, Texas. Mercedes wrapped up their respective sixth world championship earlier this year First Published: 29th November, 2019 13:21 IST LIVE TV Mercedes driver and six-time Formula 1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton has had a brilliant season professionally and is regarded as one of the best racers the sport has seen, competing with the great Michael Schumacher for records. This glorious F1 career hasn’t always been smooth for Lewis Hamilton though, as he’s had some personal ups and downs and the star feels his F1 career was to blame for issues with Nicole Scherzinger. Also Read: Lewis Hamilton Puts Mercedes Jacket Over Grid Girl In Small Act Of Kindness; WatchF1: Lewis Hamilton’s relationship with Nicole Scherzinger went downhill because of F1?Lewis Hamilton has been linked with a number of high-profile celebrities following his split with X factor judge Nicole Scherzinger. The British racer and Scherzinger went their separate ways in 2015 after being together with each other for seven years. SUBSCRIBE TO US FOLLOW UScenter_img COMMENT WATCH US LIVE Last Updated: 29th November, 2019 13:21 IST Lewis Hamilton Blames F1 Career For Split With Nicole Scherzinger Lewis Hamilton’s F1 career took off after split with X factor judge Nicole Scherzinger. The former pair dated for seven years before deciding to split. 10 months ago Lewis Hamilton: Twitter congratulates racing star for 6th F1 title WE RECOMMEND Suraj Alva Squad 👊🏆 #ATeamComeTrue pic.twitter.com/kh2WhYCyOl— Mercedes-AMG F1 (@MercedesAMGF1) November 28, 2019 9 months ago F1: Teams confirm their driver lineups for the 2020 season prior to Abu Dhabi Grand Prixlast_img read more

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