A Festival of Southern Spirits and Gourmet Grub.

first_imgThe Townsend Grains & Grits Festival is a festival of southern spirits and gourmet grub. We have created a unique opportunity for you to experience our thriving craft spirits and gourmet food community, while discovering some of the region’s legendary distillers and blenders, taking place in the Peaceful Side of the Smokies. The Townsend Grains & Grits Festival provides an intimate sampling event, offering something for consumers, foodies, bartenders and spirit professionals alike.There will be plenty to offer, from live entertainment guaranteed to get you moving, savory bites and sweet treats from local restaurants and food purveyors and a vast selection of sample craft spirits from regional legends along the Tennessee Whiskey Trail. Join us for an historical celebration of southern spirits on November 4, 2017, as we launch the Tennessee Whiskey Trail. This celebration represents the Tennessee Whiskey Trail launch for the East Tennessee region. Participating distilleries are: Jeff Arnett with Jack Daniel Distillery • Keenar Shanton with Old Forge Distillery • Greg Eidam with Sugarlands Distilling Co. • George Dickel Distillery • Ole Smoky Moonshine Distillery • Heath Clark with H. Clark Distillery • Andy and Charlie Nelson with Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery • Jug Creek Distillery • Leiper’s Fork Distillery • Nashville Craft Distillery • Old Glory Distilling Co. • Billy Kaufman with Short Mountain Distillery • Jeff Pennington with Pennington Distilling Co • Pritchard’s Distillery • Southern Pride Distillery • TennSouth Distillery • Bootleggers Distillery • Chattanooga Whiskey Co. • Cocke County Moonshine Distillery • Doc Collier Moonshine Distillery • Knox Whiskey Works • Post Modern Distilling • Tennessee Legend Distillery and Thunder Road DistilleryFOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.GRAINSANDGRITSFEST.COMlast_img read more

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Airlines Planning to Restore Flights from South Florida

first_imgOn Wednesday, Spirit announced it is resuming flights to 13 major U.S. cities this month in the Northeast, South and Midwest from Fort Lauderdale. By next month, it hopes to increase the number of destinations to 47 domestic and international cities, as foreign governments and territories lift travel bans and restrictions.Industry sources add that JetBlue and Southwest Airlines are also planning to resume flights from South Florida airports to various destinations, including the Caribbean, in coming weeks and months.Kirby says the public is “sick of being quarantined.”Meanwhile, American Airlines is expected to begin doubling its daily flight schedule this month, including a total of 12 daily flights to and from 10 international destinations from Miami International Airport. Those destinations include Antigua, Ecuador, Guayana, Jamaica, Mexico and the United Kingdom.The airline industry received $25 billion in federal payroll assistance in April, as the virus caused the cancellation of flights and shuttering of airports. Airlines serving South Florida’s major airports are beginning to restore flights, after cutting back their schedules by up to 90 percent at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.Discount carrier Spirit Airlines, which is based in Miramar, operated just five flights a day out of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport during May.The airline plans to be back up to 550 daily flights nationwide by the end of July, according to John Kirby, vice president of network planning.He tells the South Florida Sun Sentinel that a poll the company recently conducted reveals passenger concern is “kind of mixed” to returning to the skies in the age of social distancing.“We are starting to see some green shoots,” Kirby says. “The TSA (Transportation Security Administration) is starting to get a little more. I think people are starting to think about traveling again. Whether that translates into ridership, it’s hard to say. We are starting to see momentum.”last_img read more

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Natural Selection Is Useless, II: More Evidence

first_imgContinuing our discussion of whether natural selection has any value in science, we present more cases in the media.Natural selection is useless in science, we alleged last week (4 Jan 2019). Because many will consider this an outlandish claim that can arouse accusations that it is anti-science and against common sense, some clarifications are in order before we provide more evidence. The biological literature is full of natural selection (hereafter NS) lingo and its derivatives. Evolutionists speak of positive selection, negative selection, purifying selection, group selection, kin selection, selective pressure, selective bottlenecks, and a host of other concepts. Surely the abundance of words cannot be about nothing, can it? Even many creationists bow before NS theory as a fact of nature. Some creationist speakers adorn their lectures with intuitively-obvious examples of NS in dogs, horses, and even human racial traits. Some even arrogantly attack other creationists who deny NS. How can we possibly contradict the obvious? Well, prepare to think. Prepare to see.Clarifying the ClaimWe are not talking about variation per se; that part is obvious. Variation is as common as flower color, flu variants, butterfly wing patterns, and similar variations in almost all species. Even we humans vary quite a bit, but are all members of one species. That kind of “horizontal” variation, whether by genetic drift or mate choice, does not innovate, a key word to understand when reading the literature. It does not create new functionality: wings, eyes, and brains that didn’t exist before. Variation is only the lesser part of the NS concept.Darwin alleged that NS could innovate. He ascribed agency to the environment, picturing it as an invisible hand that scrutinized every variation, adding up everything that was good, rejecting everything that was bad. His book offered to explain the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, not the extinction of creatures by accident or differential survival. If that is what you think of when you hear NS, you should use another phrase, because that is not natural selection the way Darwin coined the term. Accordingly, “negative selection” and “purifying selection” should not borrow the word “selection” (which implies a selector) at all, but should be referred to as quality control or homeostasis. Nothing new is innovated in such cases.Natural selection is Darwin’s phrase. Ideas that others had before or after Darwin are not relevant, because they are not congruent with the term the way Darwin used it. It is wrong, therefore, to say that Blyth or Paley or Patrick Matthew “discovered” the same idea that Darwin concocted. For one thing, they never used his phrase. More importantly, to Darwin, NS did far more than eliminate the weak. It was a “Designer substitute” responsible for the plethora of complex adaptations in nature. NS was his complexity ratchet to explain the progress of functional order and information-rich structures that drove life from the first replicator to the human brain.What to Look ForWhen reading the science literature, do not be intimated or misled by jargon, bluffing, and a high perhapsimaybecouldness index (PMCI) dressed up with graphs, charts and photos when scientists talk about NS. We are searching for whether or not NS provides understanding of nature. We want to see whether it explains the wings of a bird or other complex innovations. We are looking for the law-like rigor in explanation that should characterize all science. We don’t want storytelling. Evolutionists have mastered the art of just-so stories that “might” explain this or that adaptation. Where’s the beef?Last time, we saw Ann Gibbons waffling every which-way with a skyrocketing PMCI, unable to prove that NS had anything to do with the observations. Is NS a vera causa? Is it a natural law amenable to mathematical rigor? Is it useful to provide understanding of the living world? No, we say: it is a vacuous, post-hoc storytelling device that not only offers nothing useful, but distracts science from what it should be doing. It is modern-day phlogiston, pretending to explain why things act the way they do, but leading everyone astray in a big charade. The proof is in the way evolutionists actually use the phrase “natural selection” in their own words. Don’t take our word for it. Watch!Examples of Empty Words in Natural Selection ArticlesSignatures of selection in the human antibody repertoire: Selective sweeps, competing subclones, and neutral drift (Horns et al, PNAS). Let’s start with a highfalutin example from the National Academy of Sciences that threatens to undermine our assertion that NS is useless. This paper uses the word ‘selection’ a whopping 107 times, 24 of them in terms of “positive selection”— an indicator of fitness increase. It also uses the word ‘fitness’ 20 times, ‘phylogenetic’ 23 times, and concepts of population genetics dozens more times. Moreover, these words adorn charts and graphs appearing mathematically rigorous. How can NS be useless in a paper that uses the concept so diligently? Well, we find that this is really not a Darwinian paper at all. It’s about the highly functional way your immune system sorts through variants of antibodies in order to match antigens that could make you sick. It’s about intelligent design!A better analogy would be the engineer who uses ‘evolutionary computing’ to sort through random combinations to find one that fits his design goals. Real biological NS has no goal; there is no agent selecting the optimum. In the human immune system, there is a goal: neutralizing the antigen through rapid experimentation with combinations. The authors call it ‘fitness’ when the antibody matches the antigen: the better the match, the higher the ‘fitness.’ They call it ‘phylogeny’ when that B cell lineage proliferates. But the immune system is programmed to ‘adapt’ to antibodies with this highly effective strategy of sorting through combinations until a match is found; then the match reproduces rapidly to stop the virus or germ.The paper never mentions ‘innovation’, and the alleged ‘selection’ ends when the body dies. Nothing is passed on to the next generation. There is no origin of species. For all its use of NS terms, this paper has nothing to do with Darwin’s concept of NS. It could easily have been written in non-selectionist language, like ‘goal-directed, programmed matching through rapid recombination.’ The selectionist language, therefore, is a distraction, a misuse of Darwinian concepts in a situation having nothing to do with the ‘origin of species.’ It gives the appearance of support for Darwinism when, in actual fact, the subject matter does the exact opposite! For all its fluff, the paper not only fails to provide understanding of biology, it actively undermines it. It steals awe for intelligent design and sacrifices it to the Bearded Buddha. Should we not get angry about this distorted plagiarism?Let’s quickly look at a few more examples of misuse of vacuous NS terminology.How much are we learning? Natural selection is science’s best critic (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory). This prestigious laboratory on Long Island, famous for its racist eugenics studies before Hitler (as well as some useful discoveries about DNA), begins with a cartoony “March of Man” evolutionary icon, with a scientist at the higher end scrutinizing his ape ancestors like a detective with a magnifying glass. Watch the short video, where Dr Adam Siepel unveils his complete ignorance of Darwinian natural selection. “Natural selection is like a gardener,” he says, grinning, who “weeds out” the dandelions that randomly started growing in the lawn. For crying out loud, this is nonsense. For one thing, a gardener is an intelligent agent. Siepel assumes the more diligent the gardener (the video shows a lady weeding), the higher her fitness. This is so opposite what Darwin was proposing, it is incredible that a PhD at a prestigious science lab would say such a thing. And ‘weeding out’ dandelions is not innovation – the thing we are looking for. It is homeostasis by design: an agent with the goal of maintaining a clean, neat lawn by intentionally getting rid of weeds.Then, Siepel goes on to talk about elimination of harmful mutations in the genome. Same problem: that is a programmed protection strategy, not a means of turning an ape into a flying Icarus with wings. Not only that, his examples of “natural selection” concern genomic regions that are highly conserved – that is, un-evolved. That requires the body to have an efficient means of quality control, able to maintain the integrity of essential genes and protect them from neutral drift and harmful mutations. The critical reader should gasp at the blatant misuse of Darwinian concepts in this context, as well as the press release’s visual propaganda showing apes evolving into scientists (see Bergman, 10 April 2018). “How much are we learning?” Indeed!Darwin’s finches have developed a taste for junk food, and it may be impacting their evolution (Phys.org, UMass Boston). Groan for the happy-looking students pictured on the UMass website, for the junk science diet they will get, unsupplemented by nutritious critical thinking, due to Big Science and Big Education’s DOPE-y policy. In this press release, UMass trots out the old Darwin Finch icon, claiming that junk food left by tourists is making the finches evolve (by “natural selection,” of course), into fat slobs. Here’s a zinger of DOPE logic: “If we continue to feed finches… We’re getting in the way of evolution.” This can only mean that NS produced organisms that get in the way of NS. Accordingly, NS is a natural law that violates itself; “the selection pressures that would be naturally keeping them apart would be weakening, possibly leading to the collapse of the adaptive radiation of ground finches.” Let’s get this straight. Darwin’s NS led to organisms that evolved from bacteria into everything by an inexorable process, but some of its organisms (i.e., humans), evolved intelligent design that now leads to the collapse of NS, effectively making NS exorable instead of inexorable. Please score UMass on just how much understanding they generated using Darwin’s theory.Lost ‘Darwinia’ islands could be origin of species in the Galapagos (New Scientist). Here’s another story from the Galapagos, the Holy Land of Darwin worshippers. Colin Barras and some others want to name a submerged (get it? underwater) chain of seamounts “Darwinia” to “honour Darwin, whose time in the current islands informed his theory of evolution by natural selection.” Turning up the perhapsimaybecouldness index, he and the Grants (who wasted their lives looking for Darwinian evolution in the finches that live on the islands), postulate that the underwater islands may have been above sea level millions of years ago. How wonderful. That may have given the animals millions of more years to evolve by natural selection.  Now that the Stuff Happens Law may have had more time to work, do you understand the living birds and iguanas better? Oh, the wonder of NS. The wonder is that we fall for it and call it science.Well, wasn’t that fun. Your understanding of biology just skyrocketed, thanks to Darwin. No wonder Richard Dawkins calls natural selection the most elegant theory in the history of science. It explains everything. Just make up a story, and it gets published, honored, and accepted by all the leading lights of B.S. (Big Science) and B.M. (Big Media). So yes, I guess we have to admit that NS is useful in science. It’s a ticket to stardom. Examples like this could be multiplied; but next, we want to show good scientific research being done with reference to NS. You’ve been told that nothing makes sense except in the light of evolution. Is that true?Incidentally, we invited anyone to send us their best example of NS leading to better understanding of biology. We have yet to receive a single proposal.Cartoons by Brett Miller from EvidentCreation.com. Used by permission. (Visited 544 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Renewed warnings on Samsung Note 7

first_imgAviation authorities are ramping up warnings about the Samsung Note 7 smartphone as problems with supposedly safe replacement units have prompted the Korean manufacturer to halt production.The US Federal Aviation Administration and Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority  have  renewed warnings in recent days urging passengers not to use the phone on aircraft.“We’re urging all passengers with this phone—including replacement devices—to follow the instructions of their airline,’’ CASA said on Tuesday.“If there are no instructions, then passengers should switch-off the phone, refrain from use or charging and not pack it in their checked luggage.’’Airlines around the world have been warning passengers about using the Note 7 after a slew of problems with the smartphone’s battery catching fire or overheating.Samsung recalled 2.5 million units but was forced to halt production when purportedly safe replacement phones also overheated.The BBC reported that owners were expected to be able to return the phones for a refund or an exchange for a different Samsung phone.”We recently readjusted the production volume for thorough investigation and quality control, but putting consumer safety as top priority, we have reached a final decision to halt production of Galaxy Note 7s,” Samsung said in a statement. “For the benefit of consumers’ safety, we stopped sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note 7 and have consequently decided to stop production.”Smartphones have become  a problem for airlines and many have started warning passengers not to move their seats and to call cabin crew if they lose their phone. This follows a number of instances where phones began smoking after they were crushed by the seat mechanism as passengers  attempted  to retrieve them.last_img read more

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Remembering Soweto’s class of ’76

first_img14 June 2012 A memorial and a youth centre with a difference are being built near the school in Soweto where students set off on the morning of 16 June 1976, a day that changed the course of South Africa’s history, to protest against apartheid and its “Bantu education” system. Youth Day, a public holiday celebrated in South Africa every year on 16 June, pays tribute to the hundreds of students who lost their lives during the 1976 uprisings sparked off by the students’ march and the violent reaction of the apartheid security forces. Mphuti Street in Jabavu, Soweto holds a strong significance to the events of 16 June 1976. On this street is Morris Isaacson High School, where the students’ protest is said to have gained momentum after starting at Naledi High School in the southwestern end of the township.June 16 Heritage Trail It is at Morris Isaacson that the June 16 Heritage Trail, which follows the route that protesting Soweto school students took, begins. Directly opposite the school, a new June 16 Memorial and a Youth Institute are being built. Bheki Nkosi, Gauteng province’s MEC for infrastructure development, took the media on a tour of the construction site last week. Work on the R28-million project, funded by the department, began in October 2010 and is expected to be completed and handed over to the City of Joburg in July. The City is a development partner in the project. Speaking on site, Nkosi said: “The Youth Institute is [part of] the June 16 Trail Project aimed at identifying and recognising the contributions made by the young people of Soweto and South Africa in general towards the struggle against oppression and subjugation. “Once completed, it will become a centre for memory and a resource for young people to contribute their role in the community through various youth developmental programmes that will be run from the institute.” It will be a place of learning and skills development. It contains a computer room with space for 10 computers. There is also a multimedia room that will contain another set of computers, television screens and print material, including educational books. A server room will connect all computer systems.Technology The institute is technologically advanced. It also has a room for a back-up generator that will service the whole building in case of power outages. It will kick in automatically the moment the electricity cuts off, and will have a large enough fuel tank to last for 24 hours before being filled again. On the ground floor, there is an open space that will be used as an art gallery. “We are saying to young people, ‘This is your chance to showcase your potential in this institute.’ We have to make sure that the battles of June 16 are won in his building,” Nkosi said. A medium-sized multipurpose room will be able to accommodate just over 100 people, to be used for various purposes. Obed Madzhini, the project manager, said the basement would consist of a large space that would provide an alternative venue for meetings and conferences. It would also have storage space. Ablution facilities, including for disabled people, will also be located in the basement. Parking will also be in the basement, which will have ramps to the ground floor for easy access for disabled people. The ground floor is paved with concrete slabs, strips of black granite and brick.Architecture From the outside, the two-storey building has a unique design: Mmakwena Selepe, the chief director of capital works, said that once it was complete, it would have the shape of an AK 47 rifle. “The AK 47 is a symbol of the struggle. It is relevant to the events of June 16.” Outside the centre, a steel foundation for a pictorial memorial wall has already been built. Once it is finished, pictures of June 16 heroes will be engraved on the wall, along with the history of the student uprisings. “It will tell the whole story of June 16 and its heroes.” Madzhini said the foundation had been designed to be very strong, to ensure that it lasted for years, “if not for ever”. Next to the memorial, near the entrance on the west, a second statue of Tsietsi Mashinini will be erected. Mashinini was one of the student leaders of the march. He died in exile in the 1990s. There is already a statue of him at the school, unveiled in June 2010. It was the second monument erected in Soweto specifically to commemorate the contribution of the class of 1976 to the liberation struggle. The other was the June 16 Memorial Acre and Artwork that was unveiled in 2006. It is part of the Hector Pieterson Memorial and the other plaques that have been unveiled along the route followed by the youth. To be displayed at the entrance to the institute will be a section of glazed steel bearing the words: Struggle, Liberty, Freedom, June 16, Memorial Acre, Youth and Rise. The building is 80 percent complete; 93 locals have been trained during its construction through the government’s Expanded Public Works Programme, a national plan aimed at drawing a significant number of unemployed South Africans into the productive workforce by providing them with skills training. Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

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Ten Mistakes That Kill Sales Opportunities

first_imgHere are ten mistakes you can make that will cost your deal.Taking Shortcuts: Anything that you believe leads to a faster deal leads to a no deal. You can’t rush your buyer through the process because you are in a hurry or because you are behind on your number.Asking for Unearned Commitments: You can’t ask for commitments that you haven’t earned. If you haven’t created the value to deserve the next commitment, pressing for that commitment will shut your deal down.Poor Follow Up: Failing to follow up on the little commitments you make only proves you don’t care, that you aren’t detail-oriented, and you can’t be counted on. Deal-breaker.Selling Without Dissatisfaction: If you can’t find or create a compelling reason for your prospective client to change, you aren’t going to make a sale. No deal.Not Doing Discovery: If you don’t do the discovery work necessary to know exactly how to help your prospective client, you aren’t going to create or win an opportunity. It’s over.Not Building Consensus: You have to believe me here. You aren’t going to win with a single stakeholder. You will lose if you can’t help your client build consensus. No votes.Failing to Make the Ask: If you don’t ask for access to the people and information you need to win a deal, you will lose that deal. You cannot fear “the ask.” Not asking is the same as no.An Inability to Articulate Value: You must be able to articulate the value that you and your solution creates. If can’t tell your client how they will be made better, you have no deal.Failure to Provide Proof: Your prospect is going to want some proof that you are who you say you are, that you will execute. Maybe you need a fancy ROI calculator. Or maybe you need a reference. Zilch.Being Transactional: Treating your prospective client as a means to an end is the fastest way to alienate them. And it’s a surefire way to lose. Brick.QuestionsWhat do you do that causes you to lose deals?What have you seen someone else do that cost them a deal?Which of these ten mistakes are you most at risk of making?  How do you change that? Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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NCAA Season 93’s Best 7: Week 5

first_imgWith the collegiate season in full swing, INQUIRER lists the week’s top seven performers in the ongoing NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament. From their game statistics to their overall impact on the outcomes, everything is weighed to come up with the best players from the past week.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games K-pop star Jung Joon-young convicted of gang rape, spycam crimes Oh, how fast time flies.We’re past the halfway point of the first round and it seems that Lyceum and San Beda have pulled away from the field.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut beyond them is where the action is, with only a win separating the third and the ninth seeds, showing how important every game is for every team aspiring to be in the Final Four.But those wins wouldn’t come to be if not for the players themselves, and this is our list of this week’s top performers.1. Jaycee Marcelino – G, Lyceum Pirates20 points, 5 rebounds, 3 assists, 4 steals, 1 blockLast Week: 7 LATEST STORIES WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Read Next Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. 5. Donald Tankoua – C, San Beda Red Lions 11 points, 16 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal, 1 blockLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAdmittedly inconsistent through the first six games, Donald Tankoua has finally had his best game to date for San Beda as he took a page out of his old self in the team’s 66-55 win over Mapua.With only Christian Bunag challenging him on the inside, the Nigerian center may have just gotten the shot of confidence he needs as the Red Lions gear for the tougher wars ahead.Couple that with the good showing of young prospects like Clint Doliguez and San Beda may just very well be building up a solid team ready to defend its throne.6. Juju Bautista – F, EAC Generals 12.5 points, 7.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 1.5 blocksLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netSidney Onwubere starred in EAC’s 85-79 win over Arellano, but largely was absent in its home game on Thursday.Francis Munsayac, meanwhile, corralled a career-best 26 points, but committed the heartbreaking turnover which took the fight out of the Generals in their 97-93 loss to Lyceum.Despite the up-and-down week, the lone consistent force for coach Ariel Sison has been Juju Bautista, who refused to let his team down in those two close games.The Fil-Samoan’s role, though, is expected to get bigger with Hamadou Laminou being ruled out of the season after tearing his ACL in his right knee.7. Michael Calisaan – F, San Sebastian Golden Stags 20 points, 6 rebounds, 1 assistLast Week: 5 View commentscenter_img Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netHas San Sebastian finally figured things out after a shocking slump early in the season?It’s still too early to tell, but for Michael Calisaan, this past week’s dominating 101-71 victory over lowly St. Benilde should be a good indication on how far the team can go.Known as a heady defensive crew, the Golden Stags put their offensive prowess in full display, with Calisaan dominating a stretch in the fourth quarter and racking 12 straight points.If San Sebastian keeps this up, there shouldn’t be any hitches for it to realize the preseason predictions placed on its head. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief As promising as this stretch is, the road is about to get bumpier for the Knights, with San Sebastian and Lyceum next in their schedule.3. CJ Perez – F, Lyceum Pirates20 points, 3 rebounds, 5 assistsLast Week: 2A staple of this list from the start, it shouldn’t be much of a surprise that CJ Perez is still flying high in these rankings.Just as the past weeks, the energetic forward has embraced the team concept coach Topex Robinson has been preaching and seven games in and Lyceum has still yet to fall.The test, however, will be in this coming week as the Pirates’ discipline will be put to the test with Robinson serving his one-game suspension following his ejection in the EAC win.4. Rey Nambatac – G, Letran Knights12 points, 15 rebounds, 3 assistsLast Week: 1FILE PHOTO by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLast week’s top performer took a bit of a bump down the rankings, but that shouldn’t take away his contributions for Letran in its game against Perpetual.Rey Nambatac did all he could to tow the Knights to the victory, even if that meant crashing the boards against the towering Prince Eze, as he became the engine that made the team work.Showing the leadership qualities Letran has been looking for since last season, Nambatac has indeed established himself as one of the best young prospects in the amateur ranks today.But just like Quinto, he and the rest of the Knights will be put into the test this coming week with a tough two-game grind coming up. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes PLAY LIST 01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Creamline gets headway for bronze medal, trumps Air Force Jaycee Marcelino. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netAdamson’s loss is Lyceum’s gain. And Jaycee Marcelino has no qualms on making that fact known.With the past week his coming out party, the offensive-minded half of the Marcelino twins is proving that he might just be the next great NCAA playmaker, coming out of nowhere to follow the footsteps of stars like Scottie Thompson and Jio Jalalon.This week, Marcelino hushed the boisterous crowd in EAC with his stupendous showing including the game-sealing steal on Francis Munsayac as the Pirates bucked the absence of coach Topex Robinson to stay unscathed at 7-0.2. Bong Quinto – F, Letran Knights14 points, 9 rebounds, 3 assistsLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netKnown as a gunner throughout his career, Bong Quinto shared that it took time for him giving the steering wheel to Rey Nambatac.But with this selfless act, the 20-year-old seems to be thriving, as the duos’ trust with each other have helped Letran nab three straight wins to pull it out of the muck and grab solo third place.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Fort St John celebrates Canada Day in the rain

first_imgAfter the Parade, Mayor Lori Ackerman announced the top three floats.  In third place was ProStreet Automotive.  Second, went to Westjet Encore and first to the Doig River First Nation.To wrap up the day, the City of Fort St. John will show a fireworks display at Surerus Ball Diamonds starting at 10:45 p.m.  Fireworks are still planned to happen even with rain in the forecast for Sunday night.  If that changes, we will post an update or you can follow the City of FSJ Recreation Facebook page.Below are a number of pictures from the parade and events in Centennial Park. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Although the weather didn’t co-operate, residents came out in full force to celebrate Canada Day in Fort St. John.The day started with the pancake breakfast at the Fort St. John Fire Hall. Proceeds from the fundraiser will go directly to the Fort St. John Firefighters Charitable Society, which helps local families cover medical travel expenses.From there most of the activities took place around Centennial Park.  Evangel Chapel held Church in the Park and there were live music, bouncy castles and other fun family entertainment.  You can still enjoy the fun in Centennial Park until 4 p.m. Sunday.  A live stream of the main stage has been made possible by Poorboy Trucking.  You can watch the stream at www.energeticcity.ca/live or at www.facebook.com/energeticcitylast_img read more

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Canada will feel oilpatch pain but likely wont be as bad as

first_img“In terms of the Canadian economy, it is fair to say that the data released since our October (monetary policy report) have been on the disappointing side,” said Poloz.Poloz added that he remains hopeful that business investment will rebound now that much of the uncertainty surrounding the North American free trade has been eased following the signing of a new agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada. OTTAWA – The negative impacts of low oil prices that have struck Western Canada will reverberate across the entire national economy, the head of the Bank of Canada said Thursday.But governor Stephen Poloz estimates the latest drop in crude prices will likely have less bite across the country than the 2015 oil-price crisis, which contributed at the time to a slight, technical recession.In prepared notes for a speech in Toronto, Poloz said oil and gas production now makes up just 3.5 percent of Canada’s economy, compared with six percent in 2014. “It is already clear that a painful adjustment is developing for Western Canada and there will be a meaningful impact on the Canadian macroeconomy,” Poloz said in an address to be delivered at a breakfast event hosted by CFA Toronto.“That said, given the consolidation that has taken place in the energy sector since 2014, the net effects of lower oil prices on the Canadian economy as a whole, dollar for dollar, should be smaller than they were in 2015.”Looking at the positive side, Poloz said the ongoing “oil-price shock” has also arrived at a time when Canada’s economy is running close to full tilt and the unemployment rate is at a 40-year low.The stronger economy has put the central bank on a rate-hiking path, to keep inflation from running too hot, for more than a year. It raised its trend-setting interest rate at its October meeting for the fifth time since the summer of 2017.But on Wednesday, the bank left the rate unchanged as it underlined fresh negatives, such as the recent drop in oil prices and an unexpected decline in business investment.Market watchers, many of whom had expected the bank to increase the rate in January, now believe the recent economic developments will delay the timing of future rate hikes.last_img read more

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Leadership contributing to No 13 Ohio State womens volleyballs hot start

OSU freshman setter Taylor Hughes (6) sets the ball during a match against Florida State on Sept. 6 at St. John Arena. Credit: Ashley Roudebush / For The LanternThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team has started off the season going 8-1, including three victories over top 25 teams in then-No. 14 Florida State twice and then-No. 13 Arizona.Before the 13th-ranked Buckeyes open conference play with No. 11 Wisconsin and No. 23 Minnesota next week at St. John Arena, the team has three final nonconference matchups in Rochester, Michigan, against Eastern Illinois, Western Michigan and Oakland.OSU plays in statistically the toughest conference and has the ninth toughest schedule overall in the NCAA.A key contributor to OSU’s success so far this season has been junior middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe. The third-year starter put together strong performances in the D.C. Koehl Classic tournament, including a match against Florida State in which she tallied zero hitting errors. Sandbothe is second on the team in kills with 110 kills, and has a .419 hitting percentage through nine matches, 33rd best in the country.       “You need players like that,” coach Geoff Carlston said about the Big Ten co-Player of the Week. “She’s certainly one of the kids we’re looking to for those moments.”Sandbothe said she sees herself as a player who likes to lead the rest of her team by example.“All of us have a passion for the game, and if I can influence my team by having that swagger and confidence on the court, that’s the player I want to be,” she said. “And if my teammates can look to me to be that kind of player consistently, I feel like that’s a privilege for me.”With two freshmen and four sophomores on the roster, Carlston said he looks to the seniors for leadership but has equally been impressed by the juniors.“I think our younger players tend to gravitate toward other people,” he said. “Our juniors have really stepped up in terms of taking on that leadership role. I’ve seen them keeping our team relaxed and in the moments.”Along with Sandbothe, junior libero Valeria León — the team’s defensive leader — said she takes on some of the responsibility of assisting the freshmen and sophomores in understanding how to play in big games.“We always talk about staying in the moment,” León said. “Don’t get excited, don’t get too nervous.”OSU returned most of its key players from last year’s squad that was a set away from an Elite Eight appearance — which would have been the first in Carlston’s tenure at OSU — and an improved 12-8 conference record from the 2013 season, when the Buckeyes were 6-14 in Big Ten play.León said she sees the team continuing its strong start through conference play and into the NCAA tournament.“After this year, I’m going to be a senior so right now, I’m approaching this year like it’s my last one,” León said. “I think we have a pretty good chance to make it far this year. I’m really excited for this team.”Sandbothe echoed the libero’s enthusiasm about the team.“Our team definitely has a dynamic and chemistry unlike we’ve ever had,” Sandbothe said. “Don’t count us out for being a Final Four team — and winning the Big Ten.” read more

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