Mandela the boxer in Joburg once more

first_imgNelson Mandela is boxing again, if only in art. In May last year, a five-metre tall steel sculpture of him was unveiled in central Johannesburg, between Chancellor House and the Magistrate’s Courts, two buildings where Mandela spent some time in the 1950s. The sculpture is from Bob Gosani’s famous 1953 photograph of Mandela sparring with professional boxer Jerry Moloi on the rooftop of the South African Associated Newspapers building in downtown Johannesburg. The work, Shadow Boxing, is by South African artist Marco Cianfanelli. Cianfanelli said it was a challenge to capture a flat photograph in a piece of art, with all the nuances of the boxer’s movement. The artwork stands tall, its painted steel plates in shades of grey, black and charcoal, creating subtle shadows in the figure. It joins another Mandela sculpture in the city – the six-metre tall jiving Madiba in the upmarket Sandton Square in Johannesburg’s northern suburbs. Mandela & Tambo Attorneys The three-storey Chancellor House, on the corner of Fox and Gerard Sekoto streets in the CBD, was the location of the law offices of Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo in the 1950s. They had two small offices on the second floor, with the words “Mandela & Tambo Attorneys” sandblasted on the window. Their office ran for eight years, from 1952 to 1960, the country’s first black legal firm. Both were arrested in 1956 and tried for treason. The Treason Trial ran for four years before the charge was dismissed against the remaining trialists in 1961. During the trial their legal obligations were curtailed, and other partners joined the firm, taking on their cases: Duma Nokwe, Ruth Mompati, Mendi Msimang and Godfrey Pitje, among others. The building is in Ferreirasdorp, a historically Indian area going back some 100 years, that managed to resist apartheid attempts to remove tenants and owners. Chancellor House is across the road from the Magistrate’s Court, where Mandela and Tambo and their partners represented their clients. In 1952 Mandela was brought before the same court and charged and sentenced under the Suppression of Communism Act.Mandela the boxer Mandela writes in Long Walk to Freedom that he boxed a little when he was studying at Fort Hare, but become more serious about the sport in Johannesburg. “I was never an outstanding boxer. I was in the heavyweight division, and I had neither enough power to compensate for my lack of speed nor enough speed to make up for my lack of power,” he writes. In Johannesburg he joined the Donaldson Orlando Community Centre in Soweto in 1950, and took his 10-year-old son Thembi along with him. Mandela was philosophical about boxing: “I did not enjoy the violence of boxing so much as the science of it. I was intrigued by how one moved one’s body to protect oneself, how one used a strategy both to attack and retreat, how one paced oneself over a match.” He wrote that he considered boxing to be egalitarian, where rank, age, colour and wealth were irrelevant. “When you are circling your opponent, probing his strengths and weaknesses, you are not thinking about his colour or social status.” He enjoyed the exercise, finding the training to be “an excellent outlet for tension and stress”, feeling “both mentally and physically lighter” after a session. Bob Gosani was at the time one of a bunch of successful photographers working for Drum magazine, a distinguished publication that pushed the boundaries of exposing apartheid atrocities in the 1950s but also related stories of vibrant black township life. He started out as a messenger but soon became a darkroom assistant for photographer Jurgen Schadeberg on Drum. Gosani’s images have become iconic records of apartheid’s injustices. He died in 1972 at the age of 38, after losing a lung in a car accident.Mandela the boxer Saturday’s unveiling ceremony was attended by the executive mayor of Johannesburg, Parks Tau, together with Gosani’s widow, Tilly, and other city officials. “I have never seen anything in my life that is so beautiful; it is out of this world,” said Tilly Gosani. Artist Marco Cianfanelli recently completed another Mandela sculpture – 50 thin steel columns collectively depicting a portrait of him, at a site outside Howick in KwaZulu-Natal, where Mandela was captured by the apartheid police after 17 months on the run. Mandela had just paid a secret visit to ANC president Albert Luthuli, to talk about taking up arms in the fight against apartheid. The artwork has to be viewed from a particular angle, when it magically comes into focus. Joburg Mayor Parks Tau sees the new artwork as providing a way of thinking about the apartheid legal system of the time. “Nelson Mandela boxing is symbolic of the fight for dignity and human rights which continues in our day,” he said at the unveiling. “Faced by an oppressive legal system, Nelson Mandela also did battle at the courts. As both an attorney and an accused, Mandela became familiar with the law courts from both sides of the dock.” The mayor said that Shadow Boxing would soon be joined by another new artwork nearby, this one depicting Tambo, Mandela’s lifelong friend and comrade.last_img read more

Read More →

FIA Academy nod for South African teen

first_img12 August 2013Racing driver Kelvin van der Linde’s outstanding recent form was rewarded with his nomination last week by Motorsport South Africa (MSA) to represent the country at the Africa regional training and selection event of the FIA (Federation Internationale de l’Automobile) Institute’s Young Driver Excellence Academy.A total of 25 applicants between the ages of 17 and 23 were considered, with that number being whittled down to a shortlist of five drivers who were then interviewed by a panel which included multiple former South African motor racing champion, and ex-Formula One driver, Ian Scheckter.‘Unanimous’MSA CEO Adrian Scholtz, who was a member of the selection panel said in a statement: “The panel was unanimous in its decision that Kelvin would be best placed to represent South Africa at the selection event.“We are confident that the maturity, confidence, professionalism and humility demonstrated by Kelvin during his interview, in addition to his unquestionable racing ability, will stand him in good stead in his bid to secure a place in the elite Academy.”Van der Linde, who became the youngest ever South African national circuit racing champion at the age of 16 last year, is currently top of the international Volkswagen Scirocco R-Cup standings in Germany after winning three of four races.‘Thrilled’Commenting on the Van Der Linde Racing website, he said: “Naturally, I’m thrilled and proud to have been chosen by MSA to represent South Africa at this prestigious and important training and selection event.“I’d like to thank Motorsport South Africa and the selection panel for putting their trust and confidence in me during the process as well as my family, friends and supporters for their unconditional support in my career so far.”The training and selection event of the Young Driver Excellence Academy for the Africa region will be hosted and organised on behalf of the FIA Institute by Motorsport South Africa and is to be held at the end of September.Racing familyVan der Linde comes from a family steeped in South African motorsport, with his grandfather Hennie, father Shaun, and uncle Etienne all being multiple South African champions.His father, Shaun, won an international BMW Young Driver selection competition at the Nurburgring in Germany in 1993 when he was 19 and went on to win the South African Touring Car Championship for BMW the following year. He also won titles in Formula GTi and production car racing.His uncle Etienne is a former single-seater star, who won national championships in karting, Formula Vee and Formula GTi in South Africa and in the Formula Opel Euroseries in Europe.Grandfather Hennie won three national saloon car championships in the 1980s.Waiting in line behind Kelvin is his younger brother Sheldon, aged 14, who has already twice won national karting titles like Kelvin. Sheldon intends following his brother onto the senior circuit next year when he turns 15 and becomes eligible.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Read More →

Hair and make-up tips for party season

first_imgAs the year draws to an end, the temperatures dip, champagne tastes better and the mood gets merrier. Partying means looking your best, but you don’t want to stand brooding about what colours, shades, styles and textures to use this season. Here are a few tips from make-up and hair,As the year draws to an end, the temperatures dip, champagne tastes better and the mood gets merrier. Partying means looking your best, but you don’t want to stand brooding about what colours, shades, styles and textures to use this season. Here are a few tips from make-up and hair experts to beat the gloom of the dull skies. Try these for a day party, an evening cocktail or a wedding.Day party lookGetting ready for a day party during the cold months can be really challenging if you haven’t been paying attention to your skin, because harsh weather conditions easily damage your skin.A well-moisturised, radiant skin is the key to a fresh winter face. Day parties mostly use natural light and thus the glow that lies beneath is of utmost importance here. Opt for a liquid based foundation, only if required.The eyes should not be overloaded with make-up either. “It’s best not to use too much eye shadow as it may make the face look harsh,” says Lakme studio makeup expert Sushma Khan. Use coloured eyeliner along with a couple of coats of mascara instead to accentuate the eyes. One can choose citric colours for the eyes like lime green, orange, and aqua colours such as blue and green.As against the powder-based blush of the summers, it is best to opt for a cream-based blush for the cheeks in shades of peach and pink in this season on order to give them a natural glow. Also, a dewy look for the lips is the thing to go for this season. The lips should be given a subtle look in shades of pale pink. Make sure that you use a lip liner and blot the lips with a balm to give them the moist look.”Ponytails are very much back in fashion this season. Straighten your hair with a flat iron and tie it up into a high ponytail,” says Lakme Studio hair expert Sudeep Grover. Other options include making a braid or any other style of long hair dressing. The basic idea is to keep the look of the hair simple, so that it does not distract any attention from the natural glow of your winter skin.Wedding bash lookLuminescent make-up and shimmer has always been a favourite with Indian women as it highlights their features. The glitter is especially essential for a wedding guest’s look to add to the festive mood.Use glitter on the corner of the eyes or the highest point of the brow line. You can choose silver eye shadow along with kohl-defined eyes to complete the look. Black glitter eye liner is popular and can be used to contour the eyes.Accentuate your cheeks by using shades of reddish brown to give them a hint of blush. The colours applied on the lips can range from rust colours for darker skin to pale pinks and reds for fair skin tones.Style the hair with loose curls at the ends. This gives a classic Victorian look. “Backcomb the hair and create a bouffant to add volume,” says Grover.Pick from the palette1. Eyes: If your eyes are brown, wear green or bronze eye colour. To give your eyes dimension, use a combination of two to three colours.2. Lips: To make lips look naturally beautiful, use a nude or pink lip colour, and complete the look with lip gloss. Use a bold red or dark pink to make a statement with a simple black or white dress.3. Cheeks: Take a big blusher brush, rub it onto the apples of your cheeks by smiling in the mirror and rubbing upwards till you have blended it. The shading can be highlighted by adding a little shimmer over the blusher. It will completely change your look from that of a girl-next-door to that of a stunning style diva.Cocktail lookCocktail parties make formidable winter evenings fun. But most people forget that the make-up should add to the mood of a cocktail. The trick is to achieve the thin borderline between a fun look and a mysterious, sensuous look. “Since cocktail parties in the evening use a lot of artificial light, the make-up should use lightreflecting particles,” says Khan. Metallic shades are great for this. Concentrate on shades of gold, silver, bronze and copper. They will give you that desired oriental look, the perfect blend of adventure and sensuality that is needed.Generally people tend to look paler during winters, so your makeup should add vitality and a subtle tint to your skin tone. A basic foundation should be a shade lighter in order to make the skin look brighter. Your look for the cocktail should accentuate your eyes. Highlight the eyes through a smoky look created by using a kohl pencil, some eye shadow and bold brows. Use a soft brown to highlight the eyebrows to give them a more natural look. One can use eye shadow with a brownish or golden tinge to accentuate the eyes. Heavy eye make-up with golden/silver shimmer at the corners of the eyes can be one way to enhance the evening look for your eyes. False eyelashes also make a bold statement. Just make sure that there is negligible gap between your real eyelashes and the fake ones. The lashes should differ in length very slightly.Highlight the cheeks in shades of plum and reddish brown to showcase your metallic look and to add a little shimmer as you get ready for a delightful evening.Saturated colours, such as reds for the lips are back in fashion and these tones suit the Indian skin beautifully. Define your lips by lining them, but make sure you condition them first. Then use the pencil before adding glitter or shine.”Sleek and straight hair is back on the style radar,” says Lakme Studio’s Grover. Whether one dresses in Indian or western attire at a cocktail party, sporting shiny, straight hair is the way to go.Dark smoky eyes never fall out of favour1. Start the make-up by applying a light shade of concealer to the under eye area, and all over the top lid. Outline the rims with an eye pencil. If you have small eyes, apply liner starting from the middle of the under eye to the outside of the eye. If your eyes are large, feel free to line from corner to corner.2. With a small eye shadow brush, soften the edges of the pencil line. Apply a dark shadow directly over the penciled area and smudge. Brush away any shadow that has fallen below the eye and clean up any areas that have smeared.3. For a more dramatic look, just add more shadow; curl those lashes; and apply two-three coats of black mascara.Show your metal1. Silver metallic make-up should always be worn as the base to your regular shadows. You can then layer and blend your regular colours on top. You will quickly see that a layer of silver underneath adds depth and highlights the upper eyes.2. Use copper, bronze or gold for a glamorous way to add sparkle to your eyes. Whether you are playing it cool and using natural tones or going bold, applying metallic makeup will add style to your look. Silver eyeliners are perfect for blue and purple shadows, while gold is great for greens, reds and natural tones.3. For the ultimate luscious lips, add a touch of your metallic eyeshadow to the centre of your lips after applying the liner and lipstick.With inputs from Sushma Khan, Lakme Studio Make-up Expert; Sudeep Grover, Lakm Studio Hair Expert; and Reshma Lekha, Head Tainer, Beauty, VLCCadvertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Read More →

Abhinav Mukund half century steers India A fightback after early wickets in warm-up game against England

first_imgOpener Abhinav Mukund scored an attacking half century after an unconvincing start to pilot India A to 113 for three at lunch on Day One of their three-day match against England here on Tuesday.The left-handed opener played a few streaky shots, including a boundary through the slip cordon off the first ball of the match from James Anderson, before growing in confidence as the Brabourne Stadium wicket eased out a bit.After the initial sluggishness, Mukund dished out more authentic shots before getting out on the stroke of lunch to Graeme Swann for 73 that included 16 hits to the fence.The other two batsmen out in the pre-lunch session were Murali Vijay for seven and one-drop Ajinkya Rahane for four. Both faced 19 balls apiece. Vijay was run out going for a sharp single while Rahane was dismissed by a short, rising ball to his rib cage.At lunch Yuvraj Singh, lucky to be dropped off the first ball he faced, was not out on 27 off 28 balls. He had struck five fours, most of them to the straight field, and a six over long off off Samit Patel just before the break.Mukund, who had survived a confident shout for leg before off Anderson in the first over, was out in the last over before the break when he flicked off spinner Swann off the back foot only to find Ian Bell at short-leg who took a smart catch.Opting to bat after skipper Suresh Raina won the toss, India A lost Vijay (7 in 19 balls) early, paying the penalty for trying to steal a run right under the nose of Tim Bresnan. The opening pair put on 25 runs against the three-pronged English pace attack of Anderson, Steven Finn and Bresnan.advertisementAfter Vijay’s departure, Mukund was joined by Rahane, who too was circumspect. Rahane struck an off-driven four off Bresnan, who got his revenge on the batsman in the next over with a short ball which the batsman fended to the slip cordon, where Kevin Pietersen ran backwards a few steps to take the dolly.Prior to Rahane’s dismissal, Mukund slashed the tall Finn for successive fours and then on-drove the bowler for another boundary in the same over.After Yuvraj Singh joined Mukund, the opener clipped Bresnan off his toes for two fours in successive balls and then drove him to the straight boundary on the third. Yuvraj had off driven the bowler for a four before Mukund’s all-out attack that also helped the batsman reach his 50 in 57 balls with 12 hits to the fence.Anderson was used in three spells while Finn bowled two before the interval. Off spinner Graeme Swann, expected to play a major role for his side in the series, bowled 4.5 overs after coming on to bowl in the second hour of play and got rid off Mukund.Just before lunch, left-arm spinner Patel was brought on but conceded two fours to Yuvraj in his first two balls and then a six off the last.last_img read more

Read More →