Sri Lankan political crisis threatens media independence

first_img Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trial That evening, they forced journalists at the Daily News and the Lake House group’s two leading weeklies, Silumina and Sunday Observer, to change the front pages of their next issues. The Sunday Observer’s editor, Dharisha Bastians, was made to surrender complete editorial control. Headlines, photos and editorials in the next issues all hailed the former president’s return to power. Helped by union leaders linked to the SLPP, they took control of the two public service TV channels, Rupavahini and ITN, the radio stations that are part of the Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation, and the Lake House press group. January 13, 2021 Find out more “Your time is done” Journalists have found themselves at the centre of the political power struggle that began when President Maithripala Sirisena fired Prime Minister Ranil Wickramasinghe on 26 October and replaced him with Rajapaksa, who earned a prominent position on RSF’s list of the world’s biggest press freedom predators during two terms as president, from 2005 to 2015. News Contrary to the promises that President Sirisena gave when installed in 2015, almost all of the crimes of violence against journalists have remained unpunished. Just minutes after Rajapaksa was sworn in as prime minister, supporters of his party, Sri Lanka Podujana Peramuna (SLPP), led by former information minister Keheliya Rambukwella, invaded the newsrooms of various state media. News News Impunity RSF_en Receive email alerts July 29, 2020 Find out more The front pages of several Sri Lanka dailies on the day after the new prime minister’s appointment testify to their loss of editorial independence (photo: Lakruwan Wanniarachchi / AFP). Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalistscenter_img RSF has just published a survey of media ownership in Sri Lanka, which is ranked 131st out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. “We cannot forget the state terror against journalists during the rule of Mahinda Rajapaksa,” Lasantha Ruhunage, the deputy editor of the newspaper Anidda and former head of the Sri Lanka Working Journalists’ Association, told RSF. “So many journalists were harassed, attacked, and killed. There are reported cases of disappeared journalists.” Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsMedia independenceProtecting sources Conflicts of interest Follow the news on Sri Lanka Reporters Without Borders (RSF) urges the Sri Lankan authorities to respect journalists’ safety and editorial independence after supporters of Mahinda Rajapaksa – the new prime minister, whose appointment is being disputed – invaded state media outlets on 26 October in order to seize control of them. to go further At the time, ITN deputy general manager Subhash Jayawardena was warned by SLPP activists that he and his colleagues would be attacked if they did not leave the TV station immediately. They finally managed to escape, but not without first facing a threatening crowd that chanted: “Your time is done!” Organisation Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge Help by sharing this information October 30, 2018 Sri Lankan political crisis threatens media independence News Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsMedia independenceProtecting sources Conflicts of interest July 15, 2020 Find out more “The violence with which Mahinda Rajapaksa’s bully boys took over the state media is absolutely unacceptable,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “We call on all parties to act responsibly by guaranteeing journalists’ safety and by respecting their editorial independence, so that impartial news coverage is available to the public. Sri Lanka’s journalists are very worried because the current constitutional crisis recalls the darkest hours of Rajapaksa’s presidency.”last_img read more

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Children helping children

first_imgNewsChildren helping childrenBy Staff Reporter – September 20, 2013 639 Previous articleVolunteers needed for ‘Aware’ FundraiserNext articleFianna Fáil selects Limerick council candidates Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Facebookcenter_img Email Linkedin ‘Children Helping Children’ will hold their National Day of Prayer and Share on October 11th to raise money for children in developing countries.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Children Helping Children is an initiative set up by World Missions Ireland that sees Irish children raising money for projects to assist children in third world countries.1500 schools throughout the country will take part in the fundraiser and last year 49 projects in Africa and Asia benefitted from the fundraising efforts.The initiative helped to build an orphanage in Sri Lanka for children left bereft and destitute after the Sri Lankan tsunami.“I have received so much support and help from schools right around Limerick and county and for this I am so grateful. We couldn’t do it without them”, said Jackie Pallas, National Secretary of the Society of Missionary Children. Printlast_img read more

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US wants to end BSE-linked ban on older Canadian cattle

first_img USDA risk assessment concerning proposal to allow importation of older Canadian cattle Transcript of Jan 4 news conference Jan 5, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) yesterday proposed to reopen the US border to older Canadian cattle and beef for the first time since bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) cropped up in Canada in 2003. “For all commodities considered under the current proposal, the risk of BSE infectivity is negligible and the disease will not become established in the United States,” said Dr. John Clifford, the USDA’s chief veterinary officer, at a press conference. “This is true even if Canada identifies additional cases of BSE and even if an infected animal were to be imported into the United States.” In the USDA’s estimation, the March 1999 date marks the start of effective enforcement of Canada’s ban on putting cattle protein into cattle feed, a practice that is believed to spread the BSE agent, if present. Canada and the United States both imposed similar feed bans in August 1997. Clifford said the March 1999 date was picked to allow 6 months for implementation of the ban, plus another year for potentially contaminated feed to have passed through the system. Dec 30, 2004, CIDRAP News story “US to lift BSE-related ban on Canadian cattle” The USDA’s proposed rule will be published Jan 9 in the Federal Register, and the agency will then take comments on it until Mar 12. Clifford said he couldn’t predict how long it would take to digest the comments and implement the rule. See also: The USDA said it followed World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) guidelines in assessing the possible risks of lifting the ban on older Canadian cattle and meat. Clifford said officials estimated the prevalence of BSE in Canada to be 6.8 cases per 10 million adult cattle. The agency examined the risk in relation to all the BSE safeguards in place in Canada and the United States, including the ban on putting higher-risk cattle parts (specified risk materials, or SRM) into the food supply, he said. Besides ending the ban on older cattle and beef, the USDA is proposing to allow importation of Canadian cattle blood and blood products and part of the small intestine of cattle.center_img Clifford said the risk assessment recognized that 3 of the 8 BSE-infected cattle found in Canada so far were born after March 1999, when the feed ban is considered to have been fully enforced. “These cases are not unexpected,” and they don’t change the USDA’s conclusion about the enforcement date, he said. The USDA reopened the border to live Canadian cattle under 30 months of age in 2005, but the ban remained on older cattle and beef. BSE, or mad cow disease, is considered very unlikely to be found in cattle younger than 30 months because of its long incubation period. The USDA risk assessment focused mainly on animal health, but one model was used to consider possible effects on human health, Clifford reported. “The results of this model indicated that these potential impacts are extremely low,” he said. “Public health in the United States is protected through slaughter practices, including the removal of specified risk materials and the feed ban.” Agency officials said a formal risk assessment indicates that if the prevalence of BSE in Canada declines or—considered less likely—stays the same over the next 20 years, the risk that BSE would enter and spread within the United States is negligible. Canada has had 8 BSE cases since May 2003, including 5 in 2006. Jan 4 USDA news release Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns commented in a news release, “We previously recognized Canada’s comprehensive set of safeguards and we have now completed a risk assessment confirming that additional animals and products can be safely traded. Our approach is consistent with science-based international guidelines.” The rule would allow importation of live cattle born on or after Mar 1, 1999, effectively permitting cattle much older than 30 months. Meat from cattle of all ages would also be permitted, ending the current ban on meat from cattle older than 30 months, Clifford said. Feb 10, 2005, CIDRAP News story “US to keep ban on meat from older Canadian cattle”last_img read more

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