US Defense Secretary Pays Visit to USS America

first_img U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel visited officers and crew aboard the amphibious assault ship USS America on Wednesday, January 13th, 2015.The ship is “one of the most sophisticated Navy platforms we have,” said Hagel, during his speech in the ship’s hangar bay.America is the first ship of its class, replacing the Tawara-class of amphibious assault ships. As the next generation “big-deck” amphibious ship, America is optimized for aviation, capable of supporting current and future aircraft such as the tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey and F-35B Joint Strike Fighter.She is currently undergoing trials off the California Coast.NavalToday Staff View post tag: America View post tag: US View post tag: Defense View post tag: Visit View post tag: Secretary View post tag: Pays Share this article Authorities View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Maritime January 15, 2015 View post tag: USS Back to overview,Home naval-today US Defense Secretary Pays Visit to USS America US Defense Secretary Pays Visit to USS Americalast_img read more

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‘Frankenweek’ will take the measure of the monster

first_imgHe’s been a Hollywood favorite for decades.Inventor Thomas Edison helped bring him to life on film in 1910. Horror icon Boris Karloff gave the monster a jumble of reanimated body parts ready to wreak havoc, an indelible look and feel in 1931. Mel Brooks’ comic genius turned him into a debonair dandy in tails and top hat in 1974. Yet the range of screen interpretations only hints at how Mary Shelley envisioned her creation in her 1818 novel: as a creature struggling to comprehend his own existence who is desperate for companionship and acceptance.Frankenstein’s monster is 200, and in the coming days a series of Harvard events will shed some light on the lasting appeal of one of the greatest inventions in popular culture.In honor of the novel’s bicentennial, Harvard is sponsoring Frankenweek at Harvard, to include a public reading, a demonstration of some of the science experiments that sparked Shelley’s imagination, a Houghton Library display exploring the stage life of “Frankenstein,” and a symposium focused on film adaptations.One of the organizers of the celebration is Professor Deidre Lynch, a longtime “Frankenstein” fan who teaches “Modern Monsters in Literature and Film,” a course that works its way through 19th-century horror. Her students, Lynch said, are “really into it.” They have also been shocked to learn of the genre’s deep roots.“I think that they are just so surprised to find out that this tradition exists — in some ways that horror isn’t just a thing of the slasher films,” said Lynch, Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature. “They are interested in how much the literature depicts monsters as things that are created by humans. Monsters are made rather than monsters being born.”For Lynch, who on Friday will take part in the panel discussion “The Afterlives of Frankenstein: Extinction, Emergence, and the Haunted Screen,” the book was the perfect match for the screen.“Shelley’s novel in some ways is almost a recipe for film,” she said. “You have dead matter animated by the power of electricity, and filmmakers seem to recognize that it is almost allegorizing their own way of working.” “Shelley’s novel in some ways is almost a recipe for film. You have dead matter animated by the power of electricity, and filmmakers seem to recognize that it is almost allegorizing their own way of working.” — Deidre Lynch Shelley’s story can be traced to a geological disaster. In 1815, the massive eruption of Mount Tambora in the Dutch East Indies spewed ash and gas into the stratosphere, triggering low temperatures and fog and rain in much of the world for the next three years.Shelley and her husband, the English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, vacationed in Switzerland in the dark summer of 1816. While there, the couple befriended the poet Lord Byron and his traveling companion, a young physician named William Polidori. Often stuck inside due to the weather, the group turned to a volume of German ghost stories for entertainment. Soon, Byron suggested they write their own scary tales. Inspired by conversations between her husband and Byron about the “nature and principle of life,” and a waking dream in which she saw “the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together,” Shelley began work on her masterpiece. (Polidori would later pen “The Vampyre,” considered the first modern vampire story.)Published two years later, Shelley’s “Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus” was a hit, before long inspiring a London stage version. “It just becomes part of the 19th-century popular culture,” said Lynch.The professor thinks the 19th century’s extreme class divisions may have influenced how the work was received.“There certainly are ways in which in the 19th-century ‘Frankenstein’ is often read as a story about the revenge of the poor,” said Lynch. “We think of it as a story about science out of control and technology out of control, but I think for a 19th-century audience, they are very conscious that the bodies that are used by doctors in training, the bodies that are used by anatomists, are the bodies of the poor. And so this vengeful creature who’s composed of multiple body parts from multiple corpses seems in the 19th century like a figure for the unruly ungovernable energies of the mob, who have every reason to be angry with the governing class.”Shelley’s story endures, like other horror classics, because it continues to help people cope with their fears and everyday anxieties, Lynch said.“At the present moment in society there’s a kind of violence that is just so pervasive that we don’t know how to deal with it, whereas films, horror novels, give us some sort of narrative closure. And that might be consoling in some way.”last_img read more

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Loss of Antarctic Base Deals Brazil a Major Blow

first_imgBy Diálogo Staff February 28, 2012 The destruction of Brazil’s Antarctic base in a fire that killed two navy personnel has dealt a major blow to the country’s strategic research on the resource-rich continent, experts say. “All the central core of the base, where the installations were concentrated, was lost. The exact extent of what occurred still needs to be determined, but the assessment is that we really lost virtually everything,” Defense Minister Celso Amorim said late on February 25. Brazilian experts painted a grim picture of the damage after the blaze, which swept through a room housing energy generators of Brazil’s Comandante Ferraz research base located in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, near the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. The base, which was established in 1984, conducts biological science research focused on coastal and shelf marine ecosystems. Meanwhile, a Brazilian Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft was to pick up 45 evacuees from the base — 32 civilians, 12 Navy personnel and the injured navy man — in Punta Arenas, Chile. The Brazilian Navy said the aircraft was due to land at the Galeao air base near Rio around midnight after dropping four scientists in Pelotas in Rio Grande do Sul state. In a statement, it also said that roughly 70 percent of the installations at the base was destroyed by the fire. Shelters for isolated emergency modules along with laboratories, fuel tanks and the helipad — which are isolated from the main building — remained intact, it added. The Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation for its part said that scientists at the base were conducting studies on the effects of climate change in Antarctica and their impact on the planet, in addition to research on marine life and the atmosphere. “It’s an irreparable loss,” the daily O Estado de Sao Paulo quoted Yocie Valentin, a Brazilian expert in charge of scientific work in Antarctica, as saying on February 26. “We lost much more than equipment, we lost lives. I lost all my research and that was one of the cheapest. Some of the research lost cost millions of dollars,” survivor Joao Paulo Machado Torres, a 46-year-old biophysicist, said in a telephone interview carried on the O Estado de Sao Paulo website from Punta Arenas. “We are doing cutting-edge science in Antarctica, studies with important implications for climate in Brazil, fishing resources and biodiversity,” biologist Lucia Siqueira Campos, a member of the National Committee of Antarctic Research, told the daily O Globo on February 26. The icy continent plays a crucial role in regulating climate and oceanic circulation in South America. In addition to the loss of very expensive equipment and all the data collected since December, the fire leaves dozens of Brazilian study groups without a fixed base in the area, according to the experts. Antarctica, which is mostly covered by snow and ice, holds under its continental shelf, huge mineral resources and the surrounding seas are full of bio-resources. President Dilma Rousseff vowed that the Comandante Ferraz base would be rebuilt and Amorim said plans for the reconstruction would begin right away.last_img read more

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£60m City deal falls through

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Family says College Football Hall of Famer Johnny Majors, former Tennessee and Pittsburgh coach, dies at age 85

first_img June 3, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditKNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Family says College Football Hall of Famer Johnny Majors, former Tennessee and Pittsburgh coach, dies at age 85.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 Associated Press center_img Family says College Football Hall of Famer Johnny Majors, former Tennessee and Pittsburgh coach, dies at age 85last_img

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Win for Chelsea but disastrous night for Arsenal

first_imgIt could also save Jose Mourinho’s job.A brilliantly flighted 83rd minute free-kick from Willian was the moment of magic that Chelsea needed as they bagged a vital win that should ease some of the pressure on their underfire manager.In contrast to their London rivals, Arsenal had a disastrous night in Germany. The Gunners slumped to a 5-1 defeat to Bayern Munich tonight in the Allianz Arena, with Thomas Mueller scoring twice.The defeat means that Arsenal must now win their final two matches in Group F, including a two-goal winning margin over Greek side Olympiakos if they’re to reach the knock-out stages.last_img

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