United Nations authority addresses refugee crises

first_imgIn his Monday address, “The Responsibility to Solve,” United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) T. Alexander Aleinikoff said the international community must go beyond basic protection and assume responsibility for finding long-term solutions to major refugee crises.  “The way we think about international protection [of refugees] is that it should be a bridge to a solution, not the ending of the effort made by the international community,” Aleinikoff said. The UNHCR is most concerned with protracted refugee situations, in which 25,000 or more people of one nationality have been exiled from their home country for at least five years, Aleinikoff said. Aleinikoff said there are 29 of these situations around the world today. “In east Sudan that borders Ethiopia and Eritrea, there are between 50,000 and 100,000 refugees, some of whom have been there for 40 years,” he said. “Sixty percent of the population there has been born [to refugee parents].”  Aleinikoff said the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, the largest of its kind, also has an unfortunate amount of long-term residents. “The saddest fact that I have learned in the time I’ve been at UNHCR comes out of Dadaab,” he said. “There are now 10,000 children in Dadaab who were born to refugees, who were born in Dadaab. That cannot be the way the world ought to face and think about refugee situations.”  Although refugee camps are meant to be temporary remedies, Aleinikoff said the UNHCR seeks three types of “durable solutions” for refugees: returning them to their countries of origin, resettlement in a third country or local integration into the country in which they have been granted asylum.  “The cause of protracted refugee situations … is because the usual solutions don’t work,” he said.  Aleinikoff said the international community must focus more on getting refugees out of camps and giving them roots. “There is a bias in the way American refugee scholars … have thought about refugee protection, that if we just get people safe and don’t return them to persecution, that’s enough,” he said. “[But] the end of the refugee problem is people being re-attached to a community. That’s the initial harm they suffered in being refugees.” Without this re-attachment, Aleinikoff said the effects on refugees are “calamitous.” Refugees lack adequate health care and proper education, face physical safety risks and suffer grave psychological effects, he said. But Aleinikoff said even though countries should be concerned about upholding refugees’ human rights, talk of individual rights does not motivate nations to step in and fix the problem. “What I would suggest here is to find a rhetoric, or a moral fulcrum that moves the international community into action,” he said. Aleinikoff said this “moral fulcrum” would be a responsibility among all countries to share the burden of refugee crises. “A principle implicit in the refugee regime is one of international burden-sharing,” he said. “I’m suggesting a principle that members of the international community owe the other members of the international community.” Aleinikoff said currently developed countries have an upper hand over undeveloped nations when it comes to handling refugee crises. “Most refugees end up in developing countries paid for by developed countries,” he said. “In some ways, that’s the bargain, and it’s not always a happy bargain because sometimes developed countries use those kinds of funds as a way to keep refugees out of developed countries.” More progress can be made in combating refugee crises if countries work together to provide long-term solutions for refugees based on a shared responsibility, Aleinikoff said. “If we go into thinking now that there is a responsibility to solve these situations, lots of things become possible and lots of things get on the table,” he said. “We discover that people remain refugees not because they have to but because there isn’t the political will to not let them be refugees anymore.”last_img read more

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Properly Developed.

first_imgPick your own apples or grapes. Dump a load of cotton. Pack some peaches or peppers. Herd some calves. Go shrimping. Or just walk in a peanut field.A new statewide initiative wants farmers, landowners and land managers to think of ways to combine the top two industries of Georgia, agriculture and tourism, into sustainable moneymaking ventures.In July 2001, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences partnered with the Georgia Department of Industry, Trade and Tourism to develop a statewide agricultural and ecological tourism program.Officials estimate that properly developed farm-related tourism could exceed $1 billion in Georgia.”It’s a combined effort with education and marketing help from the state,” said Gulcin Brown, CAES agri-eco tourism coordinator. “This is an organized effort to establish agri-eco-tourism in Georgia.”With the future of farming facing many challenges, she said, opportunities like this can help farmers diversify their operations and ride out downturns in commodity prices.Market and developSome Georgia farmers, large and small, already offer seasonal tours.”Our objective is to cooperate with landowners,” Brown said. “If they have an ongoing tourism business, we can help them get the word out. If they have an idea they’d like to pursue, we can help them develop it. We can coordinate their efforts in hopes of bringing them more visibility and marketing.””Some big landowners are converting lands to eco-based tourism, such as hunting, fishing, bird watching and hiking trails,” she said. “These landowners have land they actively farm. Part of the tour could be to look at the fields and plants. This ties the two: nature and agricultural tourism.”There’s agri-interest. Tour companies already call Georgia visitors’ centers and ask about on-farm tours. “Those calls get directed to us,” Brown said. “We give information on who is offering farm tours.”Region by regionThe initiative is now organizing groups to explore specific regions of the state for potential tourist attractions.”We want to learn about the region and bring back ideas and thoughts to support the development of a sustainable agri-eco tourism program for the area,” she said.A tour of southwest Georgia counties took place Sept. 5-6. The tour was in support of previous research by Golden Triangle Resource Conservation and Development Area, Inc., in Blakely, Ga. Other tours will look at north and coastal Georgia.”We want to explore the regions,” she said, “and bring back ideas and thoughts to support the development of a sustainable agri-eco-tourism for the state.”For more information, call Gulcin Brown at (229) 386-3800 or the GDITT at (800) 847-4842. Or e-mail Brown at [email protected]last_img read more

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Syracuse scores 20 points off 20 turnovers in 76-53 win against Boston College

first_img Published on January 14, 2017 at 8:11 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] | @matt_schneidman “We were trapping in the corner like we’re supposed to do and it allowed us to get in the passing lanes,” Gillon said, “We all were just clicking.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTwenty turnovers tied the most for a Syracuse opponent in a game this season, matching only Eastern Michigan for most giveaways against the Orange. The Orange also recorded the third-most steals in a game this season with 11, after a four-game stretch in which Syracuse never surpassed eight steals in a game.The Orange did a noticeably better job of defending the corners Saturday, and it led to easy takeaways, like when Tyus Battle cut off a bounce pass to AJ Turner in the corner to jumpstart the offense the other way. Other times, it was easier to earn the ball back, like when Turner corralled a rebound and simply came down on the end line before slamming his palms on the court in frustration.All areas of the zone were more active the second time around against the Eagles, and the Orange reaped the benefits. Even more beneficial for the hosts was their ability to finish in transition, something that hasn’t always been a strong suit. Battle, Thompson and Gillon all finished at the rim on the break, and it helped Syracuse make sure that a win was never in doubt 13 days after it was almost the opposite.“It was strictly just the defensive effort,” Boeheim said. “When we play defense like that, in (games against) Miami and Pittsburgh, we did it a little bit on the road, we had some good defensive efforts against Connecticut and South Carolina for a lot of the game…I think our defense is getting a little better.”The problem for Syracuse has been that sometimes its defense plays at a superb level, a la Saturday, and sometimes it vanishes into thin air. The two-game stretch earlier this month against the Hurricanes and Panthers is the only time SU has strung together formidable defensive outings for a full 40 minutes each time against respectable opponents.“We definitely picked up our intensity on defense,” Battle said. “… So if we play like this every night we’re gonna be tough to handle.”It’ll have the chance to do so against one of the best offensive teams in the country on Monday, when the Orange ventures down to North Carolina to face a team that just slapped 96 points on Florida State, a team that was then still undefeated in league play and coming off a comfortable win against Duke.This next stint will be the toughest test for Syracuse’s Jekyll-and-Hyde defense, with a chance to officially re-introduce itself as one of college basketball’s best or fall back into the abyss it has already lingered in this season. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Finally, Taurean Thompson showed signs of life on the defensive end, opening the game by intercepting a pass intended for the paint, handing it off to John Gillon and running the floor before laying in a bounce pass from Gillon at the other end.Earlier this year head coach Jim Boeheim once said Syracuse “wouldn’t lead the local high school league in steals,” but the Orange has flipped that early season notion on its head with showings like Saturday’s.By halftime, SU had already forced 15 turnovers and turned them into 14 points, bigger than Syracuse’s plus margin of 13 after the first 20 minutes. By game’s end, the Orange had only turned the ball over six times to Boston College’s 20 in SU’s (11-7, 3-2 Atlantic Coast) 76-53 win over the Eagles (9-9, 2-3) in the Carrier Dome, with 20 points off turnovers to show for it.MORE COVERAGETyus Battle scores career-high 21 points in Syracuse’s 76-53 win over Boston CollegeSyracuse holds Boston College’s Ky Bowman to 3 points in 76-53 winWhat we learned from Syracuse’s 76-53 win over Boston CollegeThe Final Word: Beat writers discuss Syracuse’s 76-53 victory last_img read more

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