This Big 10 Program Had The Most Fans Ejected From Games In 2017

first_imgWisconsin's stadium with snow on the field.MADISON, WI – NOVEMBER 15: Snow falls on the endzone during play between the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Wisconsin Badgers at Camp Randall Stadium on November 15, 2014 in Madison, Wisconsin. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)Madison, Wisc. is one of the best road trips a college football fan can make. Few campuses are better than Wisconsin’s on a fall Saturday when the Badgers are playing at home.It can get rowdy, though. Sometimes, it gets too rowdy.Eleven Warriors has obtained information on Big Ten programs’ stadium ejections, arrests and incidents for the 2017 season.Wisconsin leads the way in a number of categories.The Badgers had the most arrests, ejections and ejections/1,000 fans of any program in the Big Ten (three programs did not divulge information, though).Our annual look at arrests, ejections and other incidents from football stadiums around the Big Ten. https://t.co/GYhrPGpXuX— Eleven Warriors (@11W) June 4, 2018Here’s some more information on what happened at Wisconsin:Of the 137 people arrested at Wisconsin football games last season, 121 were cited for underage consumption of alcohol while 86 were Wisconsin students. Other citations issued at Camp Randall Stadium included five for obstructing/resisting arrest, four for disorderly conduct, three for trespassing, one for use of a fake ID, one for entering the playing surface, one for throwing hard objects, and one for drug possession.Of the 167 people ejected from Camp Randall Stadium last season, 74 were Wisconsin students. 58 people were ejected for intoxication, 34 people were ejected for seating issues in the student section, 33 were ejected for possession of alcohol, 30 were ejected for tobacco usage, 10 were ejected for disorderly conduct and two were ejected for disorderly conduct.You can view the full report here.last_img read more

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Alberta court ruling says pharmacist regulator can ban reward points for drugs

EDMONTON — A court ruling means Albertans will not be able to collect reward points for drug purchases or pharmacy services.The Alberta Court of Appeal on Friday overturned a 2016 ruling that said the body that regulates the province’s pharmacists did not have the legal power to impose a ban on consumer loyalty programs.The Alberta College of Pharmacists wanted the ban on pharmacists and pharmacies in 2014, but the Sobeys grocery chain challenged the plan.The college’s appeal argued that pharmacists are a key part of the health-care system and that it had the authority to ensure high ethical standards.A panel of Appeal Court judges, citing a similar case in British Columbia, ruled the Alberta college’s ban was reasonable.Greg Eberhart, registrar of the college, said consumer loyalty programs could disrupt professional relationships that should be focused on health care.He said some consumers were moving between different pharmacies to cash in on inducements.“In Alberta, pharmacists have what is among the broadest scopes of practice anywhere in the world,” he said. “They have the ability to assess and adapt prescriptions, prescribe medications, create care plans and administer vaccines by injection.“What’s most important to pharmacy professionals is the health of the individuals they serve.”Eberhart said the ban on loyalty programs in Alberta begins immediately.The college governs about 5,500 pharmacists in the province and 1,400 pharmacy technicians.Sobeys said it was disappointed with the ruling.“In addition to the professional services and trusted advice provided by Safeway, Sobeys and IGA pharmacists, we believe that we contribute to better patient care by offering rewards that help increase loyalty, adherence and ultimately improved health outcomes,” said Jedd Wood, vice-president of Sobeys National Pharmacy Group.“While this ruling has now taken away loyalty rewards from all Albertans, our pharmacists will continue to offer trusted professional advice and the best possible care to our patients.”The grocery giant said it continues to offer pharmacy pharmacy rewards in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.The Alberta judgment follows a unanimous British Columbia Court of Appeal ruling in January 2016 in favour of bylaws passed by B.C.’s pharmacist regulator that banned incentives for prescriptions or pharmacy services.An earlier B.C. court decision had struck down the ban.The College of Pharmacists of British Columbia said it considered incentives such as redeemable points to be unethical, unsafe and unprofessional.Sobeys Inc. has 1,500 stores in all 10 provinces under retail banners that include Sobeys, Safeway, IGA, Foodland, FreshCo, Price Chopper, Thrifty Foods and Lawtons Drugs.It is a subsidiary of Nova-Scotia-based Empire Company Ltd (TSX:EMP.A). read more

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