This Big 10 Program Had The Most Fans Ejected From Games In 2017

first_imgWisconsin's stadium with snow on the field.MADISON, WI – NOVEMBER 15: Snow falls on the endzone during play between the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Wisconsin Badgers at Camp Randall Stadium on November 15, 2014 in Madison, Wisconsin. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)Madison, Wisc. is one of the best road trips a college football fan can make. Few campuses are better than Wisconsin’s on a fall Saturday when the Badgers are playing at home.It can get rowdy, though. Sometimes, it gets too rowdy.Eleven Warriors has obtained information on Big Ten programs’ stadium ejections, arrests and incidents for the 2017 season.Wisconsin leads the way in a number of categories.The Badgers had the most arrests, ejections and ejections/1,000 fans of any program in the Big Ten (three programs did not divulge information, though).Our annual look at arrests, ejections and other incidents from football stadiums around the Big Ten. https://t.co/GYhrPGpXuX— Eleven Warriors (@11W) June 4, 2018Here’s some more information on what happened at Wisconsin:Of the 137 people arrested at Wisconsin football games last season, 121 were cited for underage consumption of alcohol while 86 were Wisconsin students. Other citations issued at Camp Randall Stadium included five for obstructing/resisting arrest, four for disorderly conduct, three for trespassing, one for use of a fake ID, one for entering the playing surface, one for throwing hard objects, and one for drug possession.Of the 167 people ejected from Camp Randall Stadium last season, 74 were Wisconsin students. 58 people were ejected for intoxication, 34 people were ejected for seating issues in the student section, 33 were ejected for possession of alcohol, 30 were ejected for tobacco usage, 10 were ejected for disorderly conduct and two were ejected for disorderly conduct.You can view the full report here.last_img read more

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Israel Appoint New IDF chief of Staff of Moroccan Origin

Rabat –  Israel Defense Forces’ (IDF) new chief of staff, Gadi Eisenkot, will be the first Israeli of Moroccan descent to attain the senior post within the Israeli Army hierarchy.According to Israeli daily Haaretz, Gadi Eisenkot’s parents were born in Morocco.However, the IDF’s new chief of Staff has an Ashkenazi sounding last name which prompted many Israeli newspapers, including the Yedioth Ahronoth, to ask how come a Moroccan by origin has a last name indicating that he is of European origin. Haaretz said that Eisenkot is derived from Azenkot and other variations on that spelling that are quite popular among the Jews of Tunisia and Morocco.The name Azenkot comes from the Berber languages, where azankad means ‘deer.’ It appears in names of several Berber tribes such as the Aza Izenkad tribe of the Tata oasis and the Old Izenkad tribe, both in south Morocco, highlighted the Israeli newspaper.Haaretz went on to add that Jews with names derived from this Berber word probably had an ancestor who had some kind of relationship with these or other Berber tribes, such as trading with them or living among them.The name is recorded among Sephardic Jews as early as the 17th. According to the same source, the first record of the name was in the person of Rabbi Saadia Azencot, who lived in the Netherlands at the time, where he was teacher of famous Swiss theologian Johann Heinrich Hottinger. read more

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