One Technology Provider for All Your Media Pro Needs

first_imgNAB Show 2018: Dell EMC Storage Helps Media Professionals Keep Pace with Digital Content DemandsThousands of global media and entertainment organizations, including content creators, television broadcasters, and content delivery providers rely on solutions from Dell Technologies.We are thrilled to be able to showcase our end-to-end infrastructure and technology solutions at the 2018 NAB Show in Las Vegas, spanning Dell EMC storage, servers and networking, VMware virtualization solutions, and high-performance Dell Precision workstations and displays.At the 2018 NAB Show, Dell EMC and our established partner ecosystem will demonstrate the latest solutions that help media professionals keep pace with increasing demands for content creation, playout across multiple platforms, and active archives for content monetization in Dell EMC’s booth #SL9111 in the Las Vegas Convention Center.For BroadcastersFor broadcasters, we will be showing the latest generation of our Isilon scale-out NAS storage solution. This range of file storage products sets the benchmark for high-performance and high-efficiency storage for content production, management and delivery. With a proven ability to deliver consistent high-concurrency, Isilon is designed to provide a low total cost of ownership (TCO).We will also showcase the Dell EMC Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS) object storage platform that offers media and entertainment organizations a true active archive that can be more cost-effective and more dynamic than public cloud or tape-based alternatives.Speaking of ECS, Dell EMC is collaborating with leading media asset management (MAM) solution providers Dalet and Vizrt for in-booth demonstrations on ECS.  Dalet has certified the ECS object storage platform for interoperability with Dalet Galaxy, a leading MAM and orchestration platform. The combination of Dalet Galaxy and ECS enables broadcasters to simplify data management, lower the total cost of ownership for infrastructure, and enable new types of operations. Vizrt will demonstrate integration of its MAM solution with ECS, moving files seamlessly to object storage and highlighting features such as partial restore.Dell EMC has also integrated our ECS object storage platform with Oracle’s DIVA content storage management solution. In today’s evolving media landscape, a wide variety of new delivery mediums are providing broadcasters an unprecedented opportunity to monetize their content. The combination of Oracle Front Porch Digital, Isilon and ECS enables media organizations to unify their media assets in a centralized, immediately accessible archive, providing the foundation for a cost-effective, multi-format distribution model.For Content CreatorsFor content creators, Dell EMC will be showing the Isilon F800 All-Flash scale-out NAS supporting industry-leading creative applications. The Isilon All-Flash array gives visual effects (VFX) artists and editors the power to work with multiple streams of uncompressed, full-aperture 4K material, enabling collaborative, global post- and VFX pipelines for episodic and feature projects. For the first time, content creators can get a true scale-out architecture with high concurrency and super-fast All-Flash network-attached storage with consistently low latency to turbo-charge both high-throughput and random access workloads.In our booth at NAB, we will be demonstrating how easy it is for users of Adobe Premier to perform 4K editing of uncompressed DPX files on a shared Isilon F800 All-Flash array. Similarly, we will show how Isilon F800 has the All-Flash horsepower to support demanding uncompressed 4K and UHD workflows for users of Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve.Many of our leading animation and VFX customers have already adopted the Isilon F800, eliminating the requirement for “performance silos” in customer environments to help them accelerate their projects and dramatically reduce render wall-clock times.For Pay-TV, Telco, and Over-the-Top OperatorsFor pay-TV, telco, and over-the-top (OTT) operators, Isilon provides a choice in how organizations scale. Isilon F800 All-Flash performance storage nodes accelerate live and catchup workflows, together with high capacity H500 storage nodes for video on demand (VOD) or cloud digital video recording (CDVR) Origin storage. Dell EMC continues to simplify the way that content providers create and manage high definition (HD), ultra-high definition (UHD) and high dynamic range (HDR) programming while enabling content delivery to any device, anywhere, at any time.For System AdministratorsFor system administrators, Isilon brings the inherent simplicity of network-attached storage, enhanced by the simple to use management tools of the OneFS operating system, and powerful monitoring utility of SyncIQ – freeing valuable system administrator time and resources.We take great pride in our work with customers and partners from all corners of the media and entertainment industry – including organizations in post-production, animation, visual effects, broadcast, pay TV and subscription video on demand – who rely on Dell Technologies’ comprehensive technology portfolio to assist with content creation, management and delivery.We’re looking forward to connecting at the 2018 NAB Show – let’s discuss how Dell Technologies can help your organization enable next-gen media workflows with high-performance solutions ranging from storage, networking switches, servers, workstations and displays.last_img read more

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SAO hosts virtual Activities Fair after rescheduling in-person event

first_imgEvery year, thousands of students attend the Student Activities Office (SAO) Activities Night to sign up and learn about the different clubs, organizations and campus partners that are present at Notre Dame.With the ongoing pandemic making social distancing a necessity, the event — rebranded as Activities Fair — looked a little different. Instead of storming to the booths, with just one click students were able to enter the participating groups’ Zoom calls and talk with representatives Sunday from 2 to 6 p.m.According to assistant director of student clubs Erin Riordan, SAO had initially sought to host the event in-person. However, logistical concerns and professional feedback prompted the group to organize the event virtually instead.“Last year we received 3,000 to 4,000 students,” Riordan said. “Our concern was if we have it outside, how do we properly manage the lines and waiting areas if such a large capacity of students come? We asked students, talked to our campus partners, talked to Risk & Management to pose them a full list of pros and cons.”Even though, students were not able to attend in-person, Riordan said holding the event in this manner allowed for greater accessibility and efficiency.“I think what’s really cool about having [the event] virtually is that students have been able to look at all the clubs at once, fill out the interest sheets they want to fill out but not actually go into the Zoom meetings, which makes it more accessible than an in-person fair,” she said.Senior Mariana Ferré, who attended the event, echoed Riordan in acknowledging the virtual format’s benefits.“I liked that I could see everything. I feel that sometimes when we’re in the stadium it’s so packed I might miss a table accidentally. So it’s nice to have everything in one place,” Ferré saidFor senior Jessica Igiede, the president of on-campus dance group Project Fresh, the virtual fair was an opportunity to have students become acquainted with the club. However, Igiede said there were some shortcomings.“Usually in person, people are just able to see us dancing and having fun, so you’re able to see our vibe,” she said. “Here, we hope that people are kind of getting that from the slide.”The groups’ presentations were divided into time blocks. From 2 to 3 p.m., campus offices, student organizations and graduate student groups engaged with students. From 3 to 4 p.m., academic and athletic clubs had their pitch. From 4 to 5 p.m., cultural and performing arts clubs were up. Finally, from 5 to 6 p.m., the different social service and special interest clubs talked about their work.From Mariachi bands to juggling clubs, the approximately 300 clubs, organizations and campus partners strived to spark the interest of students.“We’re happy to be here to engage more students and just say that you don’t have to have experience juggling. We have so many people who come back who have never juggled before. So don’t be intimidated, don’t let that be a factor in why you don’t come to Juggling Club,” said junior Tanner Waltz, vice-president of Juggling Club.Even though the Puerto Rican Student Association’s (PRSAND) mission is to foster a greater community within the University’s Puerto Rican students, junior Diego Silva, PRSAND’s outreach coordinator, said the club also aims to shed light on the island’s culture — something the event enabled him to do.“We really want to raise awareness about Puerto Rico’s culture and identity,” Silva said. “Coming to the Activities Fair is a good starting point to elevate our club.”Riordan said the event was all about embracing the new ways in which people can connect amid a health crisis.“There has been such a focus on what people and students can’t do. We want to be the office that helps people recognize what they can do,” Riordan said. “There’s still opportunity to find a community here. I know connection is difficult right now, but there’s so many clubs, people and offices that want to support students from the tri-campus community.”Tags: activities fair, Project Fresh, Student Activities Officelast_img read more

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Properly Developed.

first_imgPick your own apples or grapes. Dump a load of cotton. Pack some peaches or peppers. Herd some calves. Go shrimping. Or just walk in a peanut field.A new statewide initiative wants farmers, landowners and land managers to think of ways to combine the top two industries of Georgia, agriculture and tourism, into sustainable moneymaking ventures.In July 2001, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences partnered with the Georgia Department of Industry, Trade and Tourism to develop a statewide agricultural and ecological tourism program.Officials estimate that properly developed farm-related tourism could exceed $1 billion in Georgia.”It’s a combined effort with education and marketing help from the state,” said Gulcin Brown, CAES agri-eco tourism coordinator. “This is an organized effort to establish agri-eco-tourism in Georgia.”With the future of farming facing many challenges, she said, opportunities like this can help farmers diversify their operations and ride out downturns in commodity prices.Market and developSome Georgia farmers, large and small, already offer seasonal tours.”Our objective is to cooperate with landowners,” Brown said. “If they have an ongoing tourism business, we can help them get the word out. If they have an idea they’d like to pursue, we can help them develop it. We can coordinate their efforts in hopes of bringing them more visibility and marketing.””Some big landowners are converting lands to eco-based tourism, such as hunting, fishing, bird watching and hiking trails,” she said. “These landowners have land they actively farm. Part of the tour could be to look at the fields and plants. This ties the two: nature and agricultural tourism.”There’s agri-interest. Tour companies already call Georgia visitors’ centers and ask about on-farm tours. “Those calls get directed to us,” Brown said. “We give information on who is offering farm tours.”Region by regionThe initiative is now organizing groups to explore specific regions of the state for potential tourist attractions.”We want to learn about the region and bring back ideas and thoughts to support the development of a sustainable agri-eco tourism program for the area,” she said.A tour of southwest Georgia counties took place Sept. 5-6. The tour was in support of previous research by Golden Triangle Resource Conservation and Development Area, Inc., in Blakely, Ga. Other tours will look at north and coastal Georgia.”We want to explore the regions,” she said, “and bring back ideas and thoughts to support the development of a sustainable agri-eco-tourism for the state.”For more information, call Gulcin Brown at (229) 386-3800 or the GDITT at (800) 847-4842. Or e-mail Brown at [email protected]last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for April 1, 2013

first_imgHaving resisted the temptation to make this an April Fool’s edition of Daily Dirt, I do have some longer reads for you today as some regional events and issues have been making it into some very prestigious national publications. All the outdoor news that’s fit to digitize for April 1, 2013:Chattanooga Continues to Do What it DoThere is a huge reason why Chattanooga, Tennessee is getting so much press lately. They have completely transformed themselves from industry dumping ground to outdoor recreation nirvana in what seems almost overnight. They were the winner of our Mountain City poll and have garnered praise from a bevy of other outdoor publications. Of course, national praise from all sides is never enough for Chattanooga; now they want to become part of the Great Eastern Trail (the GET is a north/south long distance trail that parallels the A.T.). Noog would be considered a “Trail Town” and their application seems like a slam dunk considering all the cool stuff they have going on. Read more about the process at dochattanooga.com.Go Home Math, You’re DrunkIn a piece called Drunk Math, the Atlantic is calling out small batch beer brewers for lobbying Congress for tax breaks. In response to a New York Times piece (elite journalism cat fight!) Jordan Weissmann makes the case that craft brewers do not deserve, nor should they get, a tax break on the barrels of beer they produce. He makes a compelling case against any IRS benefits, citing the growth of the industry versus the craft movement and sales, yadda yadda economics. One of the main takeaways is that the Small BREW Act would also cut taxes for Boston Brewing Company (Sam Adams), who hardly needs it, and the numbers appear to be inflated. So there’s that, plus some good arguments in the comments as well. The Southeast, with its small brew hotbeds could be affected either why the chips fall in in Congress. One thing is for certain though if craft beer prices stay the same, we’ll still buy it.Crazy Race Gets Serious CoverageSpeaking of the New York Times, they continue to impress with their outdoor sports coverage. Following great profiles of snowboarder Jeremy Jones and endurance athlete Kilian Jornet Burgada, comes an expose on one of the region’s great, eccentric foot races, the Barkley Marathons. This is one of the most brutal races in the country, made even more ghastly by the psychological warfare waged by its race organizer against…wait for it…the racers. We’ve covered the race before, but this article does a great job capturing the utter helplessness of the participants and the draconian silliness of Race Founder Gary Contrell.last_img read more

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Trail Mix | Town Mountain/Larry Keel Benefit Bash at Isis Music Hall

first_img‘Tis the season for giving.Asheville bluegrassers Town Mountain have taken that notion to heart and on Saturday, December 19th, will be will be hosting their fourth annual bluegrass bash at Isis Music Hall to benefit the MANNA FoodBank.Since its inception, this annual benefit concert has raised upwards of $7,500 in donations and has provided food for over 22,000 meals.Joining Town Mountain on the bill will be long time Asheville favorites The Larry Keel Experience.I recently caught up with Jesse Langlais of Town Mountain to discuss the benefit show and the band’s latest release of Grateful Dead tunes.BRO – What was the inspiration behind starting your annual benefit show?JL – Well, if you spend time downtown, you’ll realize that we have a very high homeless population. These folks are a part of the community and need to be treated that way. The best place to start what that idea is by providing a hot meal. However, hunger issues do not end there. There are plenty of families here in Western North Carolina that struggle to pay rent or pay for heating oil or to provide those three meals a day. Those families need help, too. A healthy community starts with a healthy life and healthy life starts with a hot meal.BRO – Could you have a better partner in this than Isis Music Hall?JL – We are very happy to have the Isis Music Hall as the location for this event. The Woodys and crew have always been very helpful.BRO – And speaking of great partners, music fans have to be excited that Larry Keel is on the bill.JL – Yes, Larry’s bands have always had strong ties to Western North Carolina. We love the music that Larry, Jenny, and Will make. They are dear friends of ours and our musical heroes, too. Neither band has played Asheville this year, so we hope that the acoustic music community and beyond will be excited for both bands as we make our 2015 Asheville debuts.BRO – Along with the benefit show, you are celebrating the release of Town Mountain: The Dead Session. What’s your favorite Dead tune?JL – We just released the Dead Sesssion this month. It’s been doing very well for us. I don’t have a favorite Dead tune – there’s just too many that are so great. I will say that The Grateful Dead embody the term “Americana” and Town Mountain can relate to that well.BRO – If you could have gotten one of the members of The Grateful Dead into the studio with the band, who would it have been and what track would you have cut?JL – Good question! Well, the obvious choice would be Jerry Garcia. He is a musical icon in American history. So, Jerry and Town Mountain recording “Althea” would be cool. The more realistic answer would be getting Bill Kreutzmann in on a tour with us. Who knows?The benefit bash at Isis Music Hall starts at 9:00 P.M. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased in advance through the venue’s website.Town Mountain and Trail Mix would like to give you a chance to win free tickets to the show! Take a shot at the trivia question below and email your answers to [email protected] A winner of two passes to the show will be chosen from all of the correct responses received by noon tomorrow (Thursday, December 17th).Good luck!!Question – What IBMA lauded bass player produced Town Mountain’s Steady Operator  and Leave The Bottle records? Photo by Sandlin Gaither.last_img read more

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Trail Mix | The Yawpers

first_imgSending a host of questions via email to a musician can be a bit of a crap shoot.I have been pretty lucky. The overwhelmingly majority of the responses I have gotten from my interviewees have been astute and interesting. Thankfully, it is only the rarest occasion where I got responses that are difficult to work with.And then I got my responses from Nate Cook, front man for Denver rock outfit The Yawpers. He sent me a short story, in six parts, as his answers to my questions.And I didn’t know what to do with it. The story was great, but it wasn’t what I was looking for or expecting. I figured we would chat about the new record, the song featured on Trail Mix this month, and maybe some clever asides.Whoops.This month, The Yawpers released a very cool project involving a rock and roll concept record with a companion comic book written by J.D. Wilkes. Set during World War I, the album and comic chronicle the story – via the brash rockabilly, thrash, punk bombast The Yawpers are known for –  of a woman abandoning her newborn child.Boy In A Well, the new record,  is both an inventive and ambitious audio and visual adventure, and I wanted to chat with someone about it.Thankfully, drummer Nate Shomberg took care of my questions for me, chatting up the new record, it’s companion comic book, and his manhood.And if you are interested in Nate Cook’s short story, scroll on down when you finish the Q&A.BRO – What drove the decision to release this album with an accompanying comic book?NS – We had the pleasure of touring with The Legendary Shack Shakers in the winter of 2016 and fell in love with J.D. Wilkes’ artwork, specifically his comic books. When Nate conjured up the idea of our next album being a concept record, it seemed like a no brainer to get Wilkes on board to assign a visual aspect to the story.BRO – Speaking of comics, are you a fan?NS – Currently I am not much of a comic book fan. I’m more of a comic strip guy. When I was younger, I got into the standard Marvel and DC stuff, and that’s just about where it ended.BRO – How was it working with Tommy Stinson?NS – We loved workign with Tommy. He’s not too bad of a roommate, either. Tommy helped reign in our ideas, break up fights, and keep the flow of the day moving forward.BRO – We are featuring “Mon Dieu” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?NS – This was one of the first songs we wrote as a band for the new record and one of the first we recorded. The story was conceived many years ago in my adolescence. My French grandmother and I always had a rocky relationship. While growing up, I would often profess that I wanted to be a rock and roller and she would often profess that I was wasting my time and should focus on a “real” career like accounting or, if I was to pursue pursue, I should play classical. You know, something respectable. I’ll never forget her calling out the phrase “mon dieu” over and over again in disappointment and frustration as she would talk to me about my life and future.BRO – How mighty is your yawp?NS – About ten inches. Yours?Yeah, well, I might call shenanigans on that . . . The Yawpers are currently on tour out west, with dates in California, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon slated for the next week or so. For more information on these and other dates, as well as how you can grab a copy of the new record, please visit the band’s website.And, because it was so good, here’s that short story from Nate Cook I mentioned up above. It was too interesting to leave out.I done told that ol’ dog to hunt, but he’d stopped listening. Like Pa after GM folded in town. He was just talking when no one was around. Like Boone hadn’t passed, and they were jawing at the VFW. Until his brain stroked, of course. Then there was nothing at all.I can’t really recall, to be honest, the moment it happened. I saw the ash hit the straw in the barn, and all of a sudden, Jim was yelling, “Run! Run you damn fool!” And I kept screaming for Pa. But there weren’t time.It was beautiful. Like God finger painting on chalkboard. The moon was behind the big storm heads, like the ones Pearl and I used to watch off the porch before the consumption took her, and the flames licked the place where the stars used to be. Like there were reaching to God. Like I used to.But Ma couldn’t let go like that, what with all the screaming. She ran in, black as a dust bunny held to the sun. I felt my face was all wet, and Jim held me in his arms. He shushed me like the school teachers, but softer. I could see his face was wet, too.The stones weren’t much bigger than a brick The men from the institution had driven me down to see them. Side by side. My face weren’t wet no more. It was dry. Just like the morning.last_img read more

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Barnett says lawyers must keep pace with changing times

first_img July 15, 2000 Associate Editor Regular News Barnett says lawyers must keep pace with changing times Mark D. Killian Associate Editor The legal profession is in transition and if lawyers ignore the inevitable changes ahead, they run the risk of sacrificing the profession’s core values. “It is no secret that we are in the midst of a sea change the likes of which the business world — and most especially the legal profession — has never seen before,” ABA President-elect Martha Barnett told those gathered at the 50-year member luncheon at the Bar’s Annual Meeting in Boca Raton. The current debate about multi-diciplinary practices — now prohibited to the extent they involve fee splitting and nonlawyer partnerships — is a good illustration of one of the significant challenges lawyers have in dealing with the dramatic changes facing the profession, said Tallahassee’s Barnett. “The law firm of the future might be a virtual one without walls, or an accounting firm, or a professional services firm,” Barnett said, adding that she expects MDPs to become common. Barnett said as early as the 1920s, the Canons of Ethics prohibited MDPs and cautioned lawyers against being “controlled or exploited by any lay agency, personal or corporate, which intervenes between client and lawyer.” Those prohibitions have been codified in the Model Code of Professional Responsibility and Rule 5.4 (which embodies the prohibitions on fee splitting and partnerships) has been adopted in some version by almost every jurisdiction except the District of Columbia. In the 1980s, Barnett said, a special ABA commission examining the Code of Professional Responsibility recommended the restrictions be lifted, finding that relationships between lawyers and nonlawyers would not adversely affect a lawyer’s independent judgment or vigorous representation of his or her clients. When it was presented to the ABA House of Delegates, however, it was soundly defeated, she said. But the MDP debate has been renewed with at least 40 states and local bars now having commissions evaluating the impact of any changes. “The Florida Bar is one of the states that oppose MDPs,” Barnett said. “Others support relaxing the rules. Most are still studying.” Barnett said the same concerns that characterized the MDP debate in the 1920s, 1960s, and 1980s are present today — the impact on the core values of the profession — independence, confidentiality, loyalty, competence, and public service. “They are legitimate and no less valid or important,” Barnett said. “But things have changed. The world has changed.” Those changes, Barnett said, include: Similar changes in other professions such as banking, insurance and financial firms combining or communications companies bringing TV, radio, the Internet and other services together. Globalization of the economy. Client demands for efficiency and one-stop shopping. center_img Lawyer demands for efficiency one-stop delivery mechanics. “I believe those changes will impact the ultimate resolution of the issue, although they may not effect the outcome of the immediate debate in the profession,” Barnett said, noting the Conference of Chief Justices will take up MDPs at its fall meeting and four proposals — including one to abolish the ABA special MDP commission — have been filed for consideration at the ABA Annual Meeting. Barnett says lawyers must keep pace with changing times “We should ask if some of the opposition is the natural resistance to change, whether we are using our concept of core values as a shield or an excuse,” Barnett said. “Are we afraid of losing something more than the core values? Perhaps the status quo?” She said lawyers now have the chance to seize the future by using their expertise and commitment to the profession’s core values to shape the future. “Or, we can ignore the inevitable changes that are taking place and run the risk of losing something very important,” Barnett said. She said she recently came across an analogy that captured her concerns for the profession. It compared the legal profession to the Titanic. “Thought to be the most secure of human creations, both its builders and those who sailed it saw it as unsinkable,” Barnett said. “Indeed, books and films about the Titanic’s voyage suggest that the principal focus of both passengers and crew was upon what happened aboard the ship itself — who was entitled to eat with the first class passengers, what the dress was to be for a given evening, which persons were entitled to the captain’s time.” The drama of the Titanic story, Barnett warned, is while those on the ship were focused inward, important events were happening in the environment around them. “The significant reality took the form of an iceberg whose impact might well have been predicted if only those in charge had been paying attention,” Barnett said, wondering if the legal profession is in the position of the Titanic. “While it is not going to sink in the next 12 hours, for too long I believe we have focused our attention on our history, our traditions, and our interests — as noble as they may be — and have ignored what is happening around us,” she said. “Our friends in the accounting profession have actually done us a big favor with their competitive intrusions in the practice of law,” Barnett said. “I think they have woken a sleeping giant. I hope so.” The challenge for the profession is to preserve the values and time-honored principles that have always distinguished lawyers. She said values such as service to clients, to the public and to the poor must continue to guide the profession. “Principles, such as the independence of the judiciary and just as important, the independence of the lawyer, must be honored and protected,” Barnett said. “It is our responsibility to make the constitutional promise of access to justice a reality. As we settle into this new century and get comfortable with the new millennium, it is more important than ever.” Barnett also said the profession is increasingly under attack by those who want to deliver legal services but don’t want to get a law degree, and now by elected officials. “Similar things are happening around the country,” Barnett said. “Judge bashing has become all too common. It is one thing to criticize a particular decision on the merits; it is quite another to `label’ the judge and threaten impeachment.” Barnett said lawyers must find ways to ensure the profession remains a profession and does not become just another lucrative business opportunity. “In order to preserve our cherished core values, they must continue to have relevance, not just to lawyers, but to the public and to our clients,” she said.last_img
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Skelos Corruption Trial: D’Amato, Walker Offer Key Testimony

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Ex-U.S. Sen. Al D’Amato (R-NY) and Chief Deputy Nassau County Executive Rob Walker gave bombshell testimony Friday during the corruption trial against New York State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) and Skelos’ son, Adam.Walker testified at Manhattan federal court that Senator Skelos pressed Walker’s boss, Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano, for the county to pay AbTech Industries—which hired Adam Skelos at Sen. Skelos’ urging—while the senator, Walker and Mangano attended a New York City police officer’s funeral. And D’Amato said lobbyists at his company, Park Strategies, were “forcefully” opposed to working with Adam, who D’Amato warned may need to be a registered lobbyist to perform some of the activities that he did for his clients.“The appearance of impropriety was such that we could not work together,” testified D’Amato, who said he gave Adam advice after D’Amato’s staff became concerned that Adam was employed—and not showing up—at Physicians’ Reciprocal Insurers (PRI), which hired Park Strategies to lobby Skelos in Albany.Roslyn-based PRI and Arizona-based AbTech are two of the three companies that the former state Senate Majority Leader allegedly coerced $300,000 in bribes from in the form of no-show jobs that his son was unqualified for in exchange for illegally manipulating legislation. Both men deny the accusations.Walker also testified that he’s under federal investigation for steering contracts to campaign donors. He was given immunity for his testimony at Skelos’ trial but not in the other case. That probe is being conducted by federal investigators on Long Island, not by the Manhattan-based prosecutors who charged Skelos, Walker explained.After Skelos’s son first contacted Walker about AbTech, the two had a meeting about it in 2012. Later, Mangano followed up with Walker to ask the status of a Request for Proposals that the county eventually issued for storm-water-outfall pipe filters such as those AbTech manufactured—even though the county’s recovery from Sandy was the top priority at the time.“I knew it was important to the county executive he had been contacted by the senator,” Walker testified. “If [the senator] is not happy with the actions of the county…it could potentially be a problem.”Once AbTech eventually secured the contract, concerns arose that the company was not getting paid. Walker said he regularly fields requests from outside contractors complaining about the cash-strapped county’s being late paying its bills. While attending an NYPD funeral in January, Sen. Skelos asked Mangano about AbTech’s payments, Walker testified.“He was asking if they were getting paid anytime soon,” Walker recalled overhearing Skelos talking to Mangano. Then Walker himself called the county Department of Public Works to relay the question, and passed along word to Skelos and Mangano that AbTech “would be getting paid very soon.”Judge Kimba Wood gave the jury off Monday, when defense attorneys and prosecutors are expected to conference on jury instructions since the case is nearing the closing arguments. The case is scheduled to resume Tuesday.last_img read more

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Local high school students partner to clean city of Roseau

first_img Sharing is caring! EducationLocalNewsSecondary Local high school students partner to clean city of Roseau by: – January 23, 2012 Share Tweet 368 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Share (L-R) Teachers Mrs. Natasha Jervier-Maxwell and Vershanti Raymond with students of the St. Martin’s Secondary School.Students of four high schools within the city of Roseau partnered with Junior Minister of Tourism Kitwani Carbon to clean the City.On Saturday, students of the Convent High School, the Dominica Grammar School, St. Martin’s Secondary School, the St. Mary’s Academy and the Wesley High School.Natasha Jervier-Maxwell and Vershanti Raymond teachers of the St. Martin’s High School told Dominica Vibes News that the clean up was the Junior Tourism Minister’s way of encouraging young people to get involved in doing positive things to help develop the country.“This is a collaboration among the St. Martin’s Secondary School, the SMA, the Convent High School, the Dominica Grammar School, the Wesley High School and the whole program was initiated by the Junior Minister of Tourism Kitwani Carbon of the Convent High School and her intention was to do something positive so she thought of getting the youth to clean Roseau and of course we know that the youth are part of all the litter that is going on.”Second group of St. Martin’s Secondary School students at Saturday’s clean up.According to Natasha Jervier-Maxwell the initiative has taught the students the importance of not littering as they experienced firsthand the level of work involved in keeping the city clean.“The initiative created positive influence on them; the children figured that they can never dirty Roseau again because they had to pass and clean and they saw how much work it involved and what it entailed and they quite enjoyed themselves.”Maxwell praised Carbon for the initiative and believes that it should be repeated by the students after the carnival holiday scheduled for February 20th and 21st. Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Norman County, Red River Valley Speedway add IMCA Stock Cars to 2017 lineups

first_imgADA, Minn. ­– IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars will be new to weekly race programs at Norman County Raceway and at Red River Valley Speedway in 2017.Norman County is a Thursday venue located in Ada, Minn.; Red River Valley Speedway is in West Fargo, N.D., 50 miles to the south and west, and hosts weekly races on Friday.“We have had drivers asking about sanctioning Stock Cars with IMCA. We feel the division is a good fit for both tracks and felt we needed a class that was close wheeled and a step up from the Hobby Stocks,” said Jake Bitker, promoter at Norman County and co-promoter at Red River Valley Speedway. “We have 10 guys who have already bought cars and are 100 percent committed.”2017 schedules for both tracks are to be announced in mid-October.Sanctioned Stock Cars join Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds and Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods on weekly programs at both tracks. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks also run weekly at Red River Valley Speedway and on alternating weeks at Norman County.“I’ve watched IMCA Stock Cars race at Boone and at other tracks. They’re a neat class and fun to watch,” Bitker said. “They’ll be able to race Thursday and Friday nights for IMCA national, regional and state points as well as track points.”Both Norman County Raceway and Red River Valley Speedway will be part of IMCA’s EQ Cylinder Heads Northern Region.The annual King Pin Klash presented by The Bowler of Fargo, N.D., will now be a two-day IMCA Stock Car Special starting in 2017. It will begin at the Norman County Raceway on a Thursday and end on a Friday at Red River Valley Speedway.last_img read more

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