USA: Chief of Naval Operations Visits Ingalls Shipyard and PCU

first_img View post tag: usa View post tag: Ingalls USA: Chief of Naval Operations Visits Ingalls Shipyard and PCU View post tag: of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert was hosted by Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. leadership during a visit to Ingalls Shipyard​ and Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) San Diego (LPD 22), Oct. 25.U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker accompanied CNO during the visit which was led by Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon. Additionally, during the tour of PCU San Diego, the Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joe Haydel, shared with CNO updated capabilities the ship will have and progress being made.“I was impressed with the ships being built here, particularly the San Diego,” said Greenert. “The kind of multimission, multi-capability, cutting edge technology built here in the shipyard will serve ships for 30 to 40 years.”While aboard LPD 22 Greenert and Wicker saw firsthand by walking the decks and ladders where Sailors and Marines will eat, sleep and fight. From the engineering spaces to medical spaces to top decks, Greenert and Wickers saw a capable ship that will soon be accepted by the Navy.During a media availability following the visit, CNO talked about Ingalls Shipyard and the vital role it plays in the nation’s investment in the Navy and Marine Corps.“An amphibious ship brings a small footprint and great capability,” said Greenert. “It brings you persistence and as necessary, a lethal force with a credible power source.”Additionally, Greenert highlighted the importance of amphibious transport docks (LPD) and the role they play to providing the President and nation off-shore options.PCU San Diego successfully completed builder’s sea trials, and Ignalls Shipyard is currently preparing the ship for Navy acceptance trials in November. It is scheduled for commissioning in its namesake city in the spring of 2012.[mappress]Source: navy, October 27, 2011 View post tag: and View post tag: Operations October 27, 2011 View post tag: visitscenter_img View post tag: shipyard View post tag: Naval View post tag: chief View post tag: PCU Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Chief of Naval Operations Visits Ingalls Shipyard and PCU Share this articlelast_img read more

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COA Rejects Ex-Teacher’s Appeal For Lighter Sentence For Seduction Of Student

first_imgCOA Rejects Ex-Teacher’s Appeal For Lighter Sentence For Seduction Of StudentOlivia Covington for www.theindianalawyer.comA former Indiana teacher and coach convicted of child seduction with a student cannot have his sentence reduced after the Indiana Court of Appeals decided Wednesday that his character and the nature of his offense do not warrant a lighter sentence.In the case of Jakob Robinson v. State of Indiana, 79A02-1603-CR-522, Jakob Robinson, a former teacher and coach at McCutcheon High School in Tippecanoe County, pleaded guilty to five counts of Level 5 felony child seduction in September 2015.Robinson’s plea came after K.F., his student, informed the Tippecanoe County Sheriff’s Department that she had a sexual relationship with Robinson. K.F. reported that between October 2014 and January 2015, Robinson engaged her in numerous sexual encounters both during and after school hours, bought her clothing and jewelry, met with her in public in the presence of his two minor daughters and confided in her about the problems in his marriage.After his plea, the Tippecanoe Superior Court sentenced Robinson to eight years, with five years executed and three years suspended to probation.The former teacher appealed his sentence, saying it was inappropriate in light of the nature of the offenses and his character. All of the offenses he was convicted of occurred with the same student in a short period of time, Robinson said, so his sentence should have been lighter.Further, Robinson argued that the trial court improperly considered his position of trust with K.F. as an aggravator because the facts related to his position over K.F. “did not exceed that necessary to prove an element of the offense of child seduction.”But in its Wednesday opinion, the Court of Appeals wrote that it easily rejected Robinson’s arguments.“The fact that Robinson, over several months, repeatedly victimized a minor who trusted him does not mitigate his sentence,” the court wrote. “And Robinson’s suggestion that his obvious position of trust over K.F. was nothing more than that necessary to establish an element of the offense of child seduction is not supported by cogent reasoning.”The appellate court also wrote that Robinson’s character did not warrant a lighter sentence, saying instead that his guilty plea, his lack of criminal history and his support within the community were the reasons he only received an eight-year sentence when the maximum sentence was 30 years.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Equally aggressive action against property owners who ignores snow removal and…

first_imgDear Editor:Kudos to Mayor Zimmer for advocating an increase in fines for property owners who ignore sidewalk snow removal ordinances, and for the practice of issuing summons every 24 hours when sidewalks remain uncleared (“Does the City need Legislation to Deal with Unshoveled Properties?”). Let’s urge the Mayor and Council to require equally aggressive action against property owners who allow dog droppings to accumulate in their yards – a clear violation of the health code. Currently, property owners can allow dog droppings to accumulate while a summons for a single violation moves through the municipal court system at a glacial pace.Increasing fines and standardizing practices so that the Health Dept., too, issues a summons every 24 hours for dog droppings would ensure equitable law enforcement.Revising Health Dept. practices would signal that City officials are just as concerned about the well-being and rights of those forced to tolerate conditions like icy sidewalks and unhealthy dog droppings as they are about the rights of negligent property owners.Barbara Gombach Weinsteinlast_img read more

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In Short

first_imgFox’s plants to stayFears that Northern Foods planned to close its three Fox’s Biscuits factories in favour of a single ’super factory’ have been allayed by the company’s new owner Ranjit Boparan of the 2 Sisters Food Group. A £26.5m investment over the last 18 months means the plants will stay open.Foo.go revampGreencore has revamped its Foo.go food-to-go brand with new packaging, improved recipes and several new seasonal lines, including an Italian chicken sandwich and a Thai prawn wrap.Starbucks flies aheadStarbucks is to enter Finland for the first time next year, with two stores operated by food and travel retail specialist SSP at Helsinki airport. Last month, Starbucks and SSP announced plans to open a store in Gardermoen Airport in Oslo, Norway, in early 2012. SSP entered into a partnership with Starbucks in June 2008 and has since opened 29 stores in several European countries.Kingsmill margin hitPromotional discounting has result in some margin erosion in Associated British Food’s Kingsmill business, according to its interim management statement for the 16 weeks to 25 June 2011.last_img read more

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Learning to understand their own DNA

first_imgOn the fourth floor of Harvard’s Science Center, high school biology students from Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (CRLS) put on safety goggles and gloves, and step up to lab tables conveniently set up with pipettes, centrifuges, and other implements.Then they get to work isolating their own DNA.“This is real-life science, the stuff that people who work in biotech are actually doing in their labs, and the fact that kids get to do this at the high school level is amazing,” said Janira Arocho, a biology teacher at CRLS. “I didn’t get to do this type of stuff until I was in college.”Teaching younger students the tools of modern science is the goal of the Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE,) a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) program that opens the field of biotechnology to high schoolers and their teachers, while at the same time teaching them how to approach science as critical thinkers and innovators — and a lot about who they are.“It’s normally really, really challenging to give them a good sense of what happens just by lecturing about it,” said Tara Bennett Bristow, site director of the Massachusetts ABE. “The ABE program is not only helping to increase their scientific literacy in biotechnology, it’s exposing them in a hands-on fashion, which generates enthusiasm.”In its sixth year in Massachusetts, the local branch of the program is a partnership between the Harvard and the Amgen Foundation. A foundation grant through the University’s Life Sciences Outreach Program provides the kits of materials and equipment for students to do labs that mirror the process of therapeutic research and development, and Massachusetts teachers participating in the program complete summer training workshops at Harvard.Arocho, who has participated in the program for several years, said with the training, “I was able to learn everything my students would be doing ahead of time, as opposed to learning along with them in my own classroom.”More than 80,000 students around the world — 6,000 of them from Massachusetts high schools, along with 100 of their teachers — participated in ABE last year. At Harvard, which in July received another three-year grant to continue ABE programming, about 500 CRLS students are able to use the undergraduate biology teaching laboratories, where their own teacher leads the lab and graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are on site for assistance.,In one lab in December, the CRLS students isolated their own DNA (their results were sent out for sequencing, and reports returned to them several days later for analysis). In another, the students produced a red fluorescent protein — used in the field for in vivo imaging — with common biotech tools.Alia Qatarneh, the site coordinator of the ABE program at Harvard, leads teacher ABE workshops, training, and student labs. Qatarneh said she is particularly excited that the program was just implemented at her alma mater, Boston Latin School, where she was able to teach an ABE lab to four advanced placement biology classes last fall.“It was amazing to go back to Boston Latin and think of my own experience as a high school student. I was so into science and loved hands-on things, but didn’t take AP biology because I was scared,” she said. “If I were a high school student and I had a chance to hold pipettes, to change the genetic makeup of bacteria to make it glow in the dark, how cool would that be?”An assessment by the nonprofit research firm WestEd found that the ABE program substantially adds to students’ knowledge of biotechnology, and increases their interest and confidence in their scientific abilities. The program is open and for free participating high school biology students, including those with learning disabilities, and even those without an interest in science.“Students may say, ‘Wow biotech, I didn’t know that this field existed. I thought that if I liked science I had to be a doctor, and now I have this whole different path in front of me,’” Qatarneh said.Arocho said her students love going to Harvard, seeing what the labs look like, and doing their work there. “Alia always starts by telling them that this is the exact same lab that the Harvard freshman are doing, and the exact same place, so they do get excited about that,” she said.CRLS junior Peter Fulweiler, one of Arocho’s students, said the best part is taking what he learned in the classroom and putting it all together in the lab.“I love the hands-on part of this. It’s really interesting, because it’s not like we are reading instructions; we are making an attempt to actually understand what we are learning by doing it,” he said. “The bonus is that we get to find out where we are from on our mothers’ side.”Science teacher Lawrence Spezzano is one of 10 instructors at Boston Latin now implementing the ABE program. He said it allows for flexibility and differentiation, and enhances learning opportunities as well as classroom logistics.“The program was perfect. As an AP biology teacher struggling to fit more labs and biotechnology into a time-constrained curriculum, the mapped-out process is creative and engaging to both me and my students,” Spezzano said.Kerri Sands, a junior at CRLS, said she has always dreamed of being a geneticist. She wants to eventually change the future of medicine, and now feels like she can.“I just love the science of this, the lab is like my home. I love the whole experience of everything from the micro pipetting to the centrifuging. I love it all,” she said. “This has made my passion for science even stronger.”last_img read more

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New minor emphasizes interdisciplinary aspect of real estate

first_imgThe Fitzgerald Institute for Real Estate recently launched an interdisciplinary minor in real estate, which is open to all undergraduate students.“The minor is 15 credits, with an introductory course, three electives of three credits each in a variety of different areas … and the last three credits of the minor are these industry engaging colloquia,” Eugenio Acosta, program director of the Institute for Real Estate, said.The colloquia are one-credit seminars that bring in people from the industry to talk about their work. The first being offered is Real Estate Finance and Investment this fall.“It brings in experts on the business and law side to talk to students about real cases, real issues and connect students with what they would be doing out in the real world, with the kind of jobs that are out there and the experiences they will have,” Acosta said.Students and alumni from Notre Dame have long been interested in real estate, but until now there was no way to quantify the courses they had been taking.“For years, we’ve had faculty and courses in real estate but no real way to capture a student’s interest,” Acosta said. “But now students who take those courses can get a minor, so this is a way to help them better prepare for industry, with jobs and internships, by giving them credit for what they do — but also enhance the opportunities and create new courses.”Since the minor applications were opened this semester, 53 students have applied for the minor. However, due to the course requirements only current freshman and sophomores will be able to complete it in time for graduation.“There has been almost double the demand at what we thought there would be for the minor so far,” Jason Arnold, managing director of the Institute for Real Estate, said.The nature of the minor is interdisciplinary, Acosta said. He said this reflects the multifaceted nature of the real estate industry, offering classes in three different colleges —  the School of Architecture, the College of Engineering and Mendoza College of Business.“I’m excited that it’s going to be a very diverse group, and truly interdisciplinary. If you look at the numbers, a quarter of our students are going to be Arts and Letters, and 8 percent are STEM,” Acosta said. “Mixing engineers with some science folks and some arts and letters and putting them together with the business students is going to be a great learning experience.”Acosta said it is important to have an background stemming from multiple areas when going into real estate.“Real estate is a very applied field and very interdisciplinary,” he said. “You can come in on it from the finance side, the architecture side or the engineering side. So it’s great to have a base academic discipline and to enhance it with a minor on the applied side.”Through the requirement to take at least one elective course outside the student’s academic home, the minor’s interdisciplinary nature is shown.“I’m excited that students are going to take more real estate classes and that there is an outlet for that,” Arnold said. “They’re going to be pushed to take things outside of their own discipline to learn about what makes up real estate at large.”Tags: College of Engineering, Fitzgerald Institute for Real Estate, mendoza college of business, Real Estate minor, School of Architecturelast_img read more

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Rabbit Hole, Starring Downton’s Joanne Froggatt, Postponed in London’s West End

first_imgThe previously announced West End production of David Lindsay-Abaire’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play Rabbit Hole, starring Downton Abbey’s Joanne Froggatt, has been postponed. The production, directed by Nigel Harman, had been scheduled for a limited engagement at the Vaudeville Theatre September 11 through November 22. The producers said in a statement that the change was “due to a late shift in schedules.” Forbidden Broadway will now run at the theater instead. The Tony nominated Rabbit Hole follows the story of Becca and Howie Corbett, parents who have all that a family could wish for, until one day their world is suddenly turned upside down. Eight months following that life-shattering incident the young couple find themselves drifting perilously apart. Rabbit Hole charts their search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day. Rabbit Hole was first produced on Broadway in 2006, with Cynthia Nixon playing Becca. Nixon received the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for her performance. Lindsay-Abaire later adapted his stage play into a film starring Nicole Kidman. View Comments Froggatt’s stage credits include The Knowledge/Little Platoons, All About My Mother, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Playhouse Creatures and Be My Baby. In addition to her role on Downton, her screen credits include The Secrets, True Love, The Royle Family, Identity, Moving On, Murder in the Outback, The Street, Missing, Dinner Ladies and Coronation Street, Still Life, Filth, U Want Me 2 Kill Him?, In Our Name, Echoes, Outside Inn and Miranda.last_img read more

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Why you might need an overlap letter to expand

first_imgWhen considering a field of membership expansion, you may run into an overlap with another credit union’s field of membership. Depending upon your charter type, you may need to submit an overlap letter to the NCUA.Overlaps are permitted when the expansion’s beneficial impact on the convenience and needs of the proposed group outweighs any adverse effect on the overlapped credit union.The NCUA rules vary for different charter types and bonds. See how an overlap letter might affect your specific charter type:Community Charter: If you are a community credit union you are in luck! The NCUA  permits community credit unions to overlap any other charters without performing an overlap analysis. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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US wants to end BSE-linked ban on older Canadian cattle

first_img USDA risk assessment concerning proposal to allow importation of older Canadian cattle Transcript of Jan 4 news conference Jan 5, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) yesterday proposed to reopen the US border to older Canadian cattle and beef for the first time since bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) cropped up in Canada in 2003. “For all commodities considered under the current proposal, the risk of BSE infectivity is negligible and the disease will not become established in the United States,” said Dr. John Clifford, the USDA’s chief veterinary officer, at a press conference. “This is true even if Canada identifies additional cases of BSE and even if an infected animal were to be imported into the United States.” In the USDA’s estimation, the March 1999 date marks the start of effective enforcement of Canada’s ban on putting cattle protein into cattle feed, a practice that is believed to spread the BSE agent, if present. Canada and the United States both imposed similar feed bans in August 1997. Clifford said the March 1999 date was picked to allow 6 months for implementation of the ban, plus another year for potentially contaminated feed to have passed through the system. Dec 30, 2004, CIDRAP News story “US to lift BSE-related ban on Canadian cattle” The USDA’s proposed rule will be published Jan 9 in the Federal Register, and the agency will then take comments on it until Mar 12. Clifford said he couldn’t predict how long it would take to digest the comments and implement the rule. See also: The USDA said it followed World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) guidelines in assessing the possible risks of lifting the ban on older Canadian cattle and meat. Clifford said officials estimated the prevalence of BSE in Canada to be 6.8 cases per 10 million adult cattle. The agency examined the risk in relation to all the BSE safeguards in place in Canada and the United States, including the ban on putting higher-risk cattle parts (specified risk materials, or SRM) into the food supply, he said. Besides ending the ban on older cattle and beef, the USDA is proposing to allow importation of Canadian cattle blood and blood products and part of the small intestine of cattle.center_img Clifford said the risk assessment recognized that 3 of the 8 BSE-infected cattle found in Canada so far were born after March 1999, when the feed ban is considered to have been fully enforced. “These cases are not unexpected,” and they don’t change the USDA’s conclusion about the enforcement date, he said. The USDA reopened the border to live Canadian cattle under 30 months of age in 2005, but the ban remained on older cattle and beef. BSE, or mad cow disease, is considered very unlikely to be found in cattle younger than 30 months because of its long incubation period. The USDA risk assessment focused mainly on animal health, but one model was used to consider possible effects on human health, Clifford reported. “The results of this model indicated that these potential impacts are extremely low,” he said. “Public health in the United States is protected through slaughter practices, including the removal of specified risk materials and the feed ban.” Agency officials said a formal risk assessment indicates that if the prevalence of BSE in Canada declines or—considered less likely—stays the same over the next 20 years, the risk that BSE would enter and spread within the United States is negligible. Canada has had 8 BSE cases since May 2003, including 5 in 2006. Jan 4 USDA news release Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns commented in a news release, “We previously recognized Canada’s comprehensive set of safeguards and we have now completed a risk assessment confirming that additional animals and products can be safely traded. Our approach is consistent with science-based international guidelines.” The rule would allow importation of live cattle born on or after Mar 1, 1999, effectively permitting cattle much older than 30 months. Meat from cattle of all ages would also be permitted, ending the current ban on meat from cattle older than 30 months, Clifford said. Feb 10, 2005, CIDRAP News story “US to keep ban on meat from older Canadian cattle”last_img read more

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How far should protests be taken?

first_imgI watched the news showcasing these students who walked out of school because they want a change. Their goal is gun control, but to what extent? I retired as a teacher 14 years ago. We were aware of school shootings then. The thing that worries me now is the increase in student suicides since then. It’s a definite result of bullying. The thing that has changed since then is Facebook. It allows someone to belittle and terrorize someone unseen. You can even abuse students states away. If these students are sincere, they should get off Facebook. I know their response would be to ask why penalize the vast majority for the actions of a demented few. Yet isn’t that what you’re doing with gun control?  I can’t believe all gun owners are potential murderers.While I’m at it, I’d like to comment about the Starbucks problem. The CEO of Starbucks said it isn’t a company policy to deny bathroom usage to anyone in need. Buying something isn’t necessary. I hope you’re aware of this next winter when those cold days come around. I see this as an invitation to any homeless persons who need to get out of the cold. I realize some people will feel uncomfortable drinking coffee and eating baked goods while a needy person is watching. I realize this is a case of putting humanity before profit. Isn’t that what America is all about? Just look at the drug manufacturers and oil companies.Pete PidgeonScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff… Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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