Eminence Ensemble Announces 2019 Coast-To-Coast Summer Tour

first_imgOn Tuesday, Colorado’s own rock fusion outfit Eminence Ensemble announced an extensive 2019 coast-to-coast summer tour, which will begin with a performance at Chillicothe, IL’s Summer Camp Music Festival on May 26th and span through September 27th with a hometown blowout at Denver’s Cervantes’.In February, the six-piece band—comprised of Nick Baum (percussion, lead vocals), Justin Neely(guitar), Taylor Frederick (guitar), Zac Flynn (bass), Johnny Bosbyshell (keyboards), and Tanner Bardin (drums)—released their latest studio album, Real News. The 13 tracks of new studio material marks the band’s first studio release with Frederick and Bosbyshell.Eminence Ensemble Sets Out On Nationwide Tour In Support Of New Album, ‘Real News’Following Eminence Ensemble’s Summer Camp Music Festival appearance, the band will continue with stops at Breckenridge, CO’s Broken Compass Brewing (5/31); Frisco, CO’s Frisco BBQ Challenge (6/13); Houston, TX’s Last Concert Cafe (6/27); Austin, TX’s Empire Control Room (6/28); Dallas, TX’s Deep Ellum Art Co. (6/29); Carpenter, WY’s Compound Sound Music Festival (7/6); Milwaukee, WI’s Miramar Theater (7/17); Lansing, MI’s The Loft (7/19); Scranton, PA’s Camp Bisco (7/20); Lakewood, OH’s Winchester Music Tavern (7/24); Covington, KY’s Madison Live (7/25); and Indianapolis, IN’s The Mousetrap on July 26th.The band will regroup at Phoenix, AZ’s Last Exit Live on August 9th, followed by stops at San Diego, CA’s Winstons (8/10); Belden, CA’s Wave Spell Music Festival (8/15); Reno, NV’s Virginia Street Brewhouse (8/17); Silverton, CO’s Silverton Concert Series (9/20); Buena Vista, CO’s The Lariat (9/21);Head to Eminence Ensemble’s website for ticketing and more information.Eminence Ensemble 2019 Tour Dates:5/26 – Summer Camp Music Festival – Chillicothe, IL5/31 – Broken Compass Brewing – Breckenridge, CO6/13 – Frisco BBQ Challenge – Frisco, CO6/27 – Last Concert Cafe – Houston, TX6/28 – Empire Control Room – Austin, TX6/29 – Deep Ellum Art Co. – Dallas, TX7/6 – Compound Sound Music Festival – Carpenter, WY7/17 – The Miramar Theater – Milwaukee, WI7/19 – The Loft – Lansing, MI7/20 – Camp Bisco – Scranton, PA7/24 – Winchester Music Tavern – Lakewood, OH7/25 – Madison Live – Covington, KY7/26 – The Mousetrap – Indianapolis, IN8/9 – Last Exit Live – Phoenix, AZ8/10 – Winstons – San Diego, CA8/15 – Wave Spell Music Festival – Belden, CA8/17 – Virginia Street Brewhouse – Reno, NV9/20 – Silverton Concert Series – Silverton, CO9/21 – The Lariat – Buena Vista, CO9/27 – Cervantes’ – Denver, COView Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Women’s basketball gets expert advice — and they win

first_imgHarvard women’s basketball continued its impressive run Friday by overcoming a feisty Cornell squad in the final minutes 62-59, bringing in its 15th consecutive win of the season. Guard Sydney Skinner ’19 scored a career high 23 points, while teammate Taylor Rooks ’18 tallied 13 points, six rebounds, and two steals. Forward Jeannie Boehm ’20 pulled down 13 rebounds, while both she and Madeline Raster ’19 led the team in assists with four apiece. With solid contributions from multiple players, the victory was a complete team effort.To augment the win, honorary coaches Harvard President Drew Faust, Danoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana and his wife, Stephanie Khurana, the Faculty Deans for Cabot House, got bench seats for a close-up view.President Drew Faust (right) was joined by Dean Rakesh Khurana (left) and his wife Stephanie Khurana on the Harvard bench as honorary coaches for the game. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerWomen continue winning streak next nightThe following night the team won another nail-biter against Columbia, with Raster sinking the game-winning shot with 4.9 seconds to go for a 70-68 final score. Boehm and Katie Benzan ’20 led the scoring with 20 apiece, while Destiny Nunley ’17 led in rebounds with nine. This was the team’s 16th consecutive win, tying the program record, and gives them an early, 4-0 lead atop the Ivy League. Next up are back-to-back away games at Penn and Princeton next weekend, putting the spectacular start to a good test.SaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Forward thinking

first_img New technique tracks brain function 60 times faster than traditional fMRI Devices used in mice offer a more accurate way to study the brain, potential treatment for disease, damage, mental illness Seeing brain activity in ‘almost real time’ Sensors go undercover to outsmart the brain Related Researchers have made a major advance in the development of human brain “organoids” — miniature, 3D tissue cultures that model brains in a dish. The new method, published in Nature, consistently grows the same types of cells, in the same order, as the developing human cerebral cortex. The advance could change the way researchers study neuropsychiatric diseases and test the effectiveness of drugs.The genetics behind human neurological disease are complex, with large spans of the genome contributing to disease onset and progression. Studying neurological diseases in other animals provides limited opportunities for relevant discovery, as human brains are quite distinctive.Organoids — simplified, multicell replicas with some of the features of the organ they model, organoids allow scientists to see how cell types within a structure interact with one another — offer great promise for studying human disease directly. But so far, they have failed in one very important way: They’re inconsistent.“We might all use our brains differently, but each of us has the same collection of cell types and basic connections,” said senior author Paola Arlotta, the Golub Family Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology at Harvard and a member of the Broad’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research. “That consistency is crucial and, with very few exceptions, it is reproduced every time the human brain forms in the womb. There are only the smallest differences between us in terms of the cell types and structures in our brains.”So far, that has not been the case with organoids. While they do generate human brain cells, each one is unique. That means they cannot be used easily to compare differences between diseased and control brain tissues reliably.“Organoids have dramatically advanced our ability to study the human developing brain,” said Arlotta. “But until now, each one has been its own snowflake, making its own special mix of cell types in a way that could not have been predicted at the outset. We solved that problem.”Building on seminal work led by the late stem cell biologist Yoshiki Sasai, the team created organoids that are virtually indistinguishable from one another — even when grown for longer than six months in the laboratory.Furthermore, under specific culture conditions the organoids were healthy and able to develop long enough to produce a broad spectrum of the cell types normally found in the human cerebral cortex.These advances mean that brain organoids can now be used as viable experimental systems to study diseases in patient tissues directly, and to compare the effects of various drugs. “Human brain organoids create the opportunity to understand human brain development and provide a critical model, mediating between dispersed cell cultures and animals to study many devastating neurodevelopmental disorders,” said Steven Hyman, core institute member and director of the Stanley Center. “The utility of this model has been limited by its variability until now. The Arlotta lab has taken a giant step toward making brain organoids into much-needed models in which to study human brain disease.”,The same cells, the same wayThe researchers focused on organoids of the cerebral cortex — the part of the brain responsible for cognition, language, and sensation. The cerebral cortex plays a key role in neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia.“We made organoids from multiple stem cell lines, from both male and female origins — so their genetic backgrounds were different,” said lead author Silvia Velasco, a research scientist at Harvard and the Broad Institute.Human brain tissues grow very slowly. In this study, after six months the organoids had grown to three millimeters across. In the largest single-cell RNA sequencing experiment in brain organoids to date, the researchers grouped cells based on which genes were expressed at various stages. Using computational models for big data analysis, they compared each group to the cell types that develop in the embryonic cerebral cortex.“Despite the different genetic backgrounds, we saw that the same cell types were made in the same way, in the correct order and, most importantly, in each organoid,” said Velasco. “We were really excited that this model gave us such consistency.”A new way to investigate diseaseUsing the optimized method from this study, researchers could make organoids from stem cells derived from patients, or engineer cells containing mutations that are associated with specific diseases.Arlotta’s lab is currently exploring autism, using CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing techniques to develop brain organoids specific to the disorder.“It is now possible to compare ‘control’ organoids with ones we create with mutations we know to be associated with the disease. This will give us a lot more certainty about which differences are meaningful, which cells are affected, and which molecular pathways go awry,” said Arlotta. “Having reproducible organoids will help us move much more swiftly toward concrete interventions, because they will direct us to the specific genetic features that give rise to the disease. In the future, I envisage we will be able to ask far more precise questions about what goes wrong in the context of psychiatric illness.” “In a short time, we have gained a remarkable amount of knowledge about the many different cell types in the human brain,” said co-author Aviv Regev, who is a core institute member and chair of the Faculty at the Broad Institute, as well as co-chair of the Human Cell Atlas project. “That knowledge has given us a foundation for creating models of this incredibly complex organ. Overcoming the problem of reproducibility opens the doors to studying the human brain in ways that would have been thought impossible just a few years ago.”“Not only does this advance make it immediately possible to study brain diseases,” added Doug Melton, Xander University Professor at Harvard University and co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, “but the consistency and reproducibility is likely a first step in using organoids to begin to understand how brain functions develop — how sets of neurons ‘learn’ and ‘remember.’”This work was supported by grants from the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, the National Institutes of Health, the Klarman Cell Observatory, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.Source article: Velasco S., et al. (2019). Individual brain organoids reproducibly form cell diversity of the human cerebral cortex. Nature (in press).last_img read more

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Athletic director addresses alma mater policy

first_imgAt Wednesday night’s Student Senate meeting, Director of Athletics Jack Swarbrick addressed the group about the alma mater policy and the Campus Crossroads stadium expansion.Swarbrick explained the origin of the alma mater policy, by which the football team does not sing the song after home losses.“The decision actually occurred more than a full year before it manifested itself,” Swarbrick said. “We were fortunate to not have a home loss for quite a while, and we had a bunch of guys who hadn’t been around for the decision who didn’t know what to do.“The discussion was prompted after an away game. It was really an unhappy experience. … It was everything you’d expect — a lot of unfriendly gestures, a lot of stuff being thrown, a lot of foul language. It seemed totally inconsistent with singing the words of the alma mater. After that, we said to ourselves, ‘What is our rule?’”Swarbrick said the football team’s “student leaders” were behind the decision two years ago, not the University administration.“I was proud of the process, proud that students made the decision,” he said. “I was proud to support almost any conclusion they would have reached.”The policy will continue to be debated in the future, Swarbrick said.“Just as we posed the question two years ago, we will pose it again in the spring,” he said.Swarbrick also defended the new Campus Crossroads expansion project after O’Neill Hall senator Kyle McCaffery said students are concerned about the project possibly interfering with events, such as commencement.“The principle dynamic is the encroachment on parking,” Swarbrick said. “The construction fence will move out into the parking lot. However, parking will be made available during commencement and football games.”Swarbrick said he was excited about increased space for RecSports’s use and hospitality space.“For all the great things about this campus, there just aren’t a lot of spaces where you can have functions,” he said. “Whether it’s a small concert or a dance, we’re creating space for these things.”Other decisions about Notre Dame Stadium, such as whether turf or a video board will be installed, are still undetermined, Swarbrick said.Student body president Alex Coccia welcomed incoming president and vice president Lauren Vidal and Matt Devine, who will sit in on Senate meetings until their term officially begins April 1.last_img read more

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Wall, Bullard receive SBA honors

first_imgNews Release span.heading4{ text-align: left}p{ margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1px}body{ font-family: “Times New Roman”, serif; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal}Wall, Bullard receive SBA honorsJohn Wall, President, Wall/Goldfinger, Inc, Northfield, Vermont, has been named theU.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) 2006 Vermont Small Business Person ofthe Year. Nominated by Richard Angney, Executive Vice President, Central VermontEconomic Development Corporation, Wall was selected for outstanding leadership relatedto his company’s staying power, employee growth, increase in sales, innovative ingenuity,response to adversity and contributions to the community.Wall/Goldfinger designs and manufactures high-end board and conference room furniturefor Fortune 500 corporations and leading financial and academic institutions including theFederal Reserve, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations, the New York StockExchange, CBS, Bank of America and Pfizer. Many of the important decisions of our timeare made around Wall/Goldfinger boardroom tables equipped with state-of-the-artcommunication technology.John Wall’s leadership is a model of innovation, integrity and sustainability,” said KennethA. Silvia, SBA Vermont District Director. “When his company came to a virtual standstillduring the aftermath of September 11, John managed to retain his employees and,working with them as a team, made an outstanding come-back during the recoveryperiod.”Wall/Goldfinger began with four employees in 1976 and by 2006, the number had grown to40. The original shop, a rudimentary 2,000 square ft. facility, had expanded into a 52,000sq. foot factory accommodating state-of-the-art finish applications, computer-controlledrouting and sophisticated wood machining and sanding systems. With the help of an SBA-guaranteed loan through Northfield Savings Bank, John Wall purchased MichaelGoldfinger’s share of the company in 1993 and led the company to nearly $7 million insales in 2005. Since its inception in 1976, the company’s resilience has been tested a number of timesbut never to the degree produced by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.Immediately following the attacks, corporate business in Manhattan and Washington, DCcame to a standstill. In 2002, U.S. contract furniture industry sales dropped from $12billion to $8 billion. While much of the business world gradually returned to normal, thecustom furniture industry suffered a second and even more dramatic setback. Theplanning cycle for new business had been seriously disrupted by the 9/11 attacks. With anaverage gestation period of two years for new projects, an even more dire business “hole”emerged in 2003. Wall/Goldfinger found itself at a critical crossroads. The company faced huge losses thatcould be mitigated by a reduction in manpower. However, Wall and the management teamconsidered the company’s skilled work force its only trump card. Losing employees wouldhave provided instant relief, but at what cost to the company’s long-range success? Walland the management team decided to retain the work force as long as financially possible.In many cases, employees were put on non-revenue producing tasks. Sales dropped 8%in 2001, rebounded 35% in 2002, and dropped again by 26% in 2003. The cost was greatto Wall/Goldfinger’s bottom line, capital resources and Wall’s personal net worth. However, the company concentrated on product development and marketing anddeveloped an interactive relationship with their top 100 architectural clients. The gambleproved successful as the market turned around in early 2004. With an experienced workforce in place, the company was well-positioned to seize new opportunities, and seizethem it did. Wall/Goldfinger experienced record sales in 2004 (up 43%) and by 2005,sales topped out at nearly $7 million. Wall/Goldfinger, Inc. offers numerous employee benefits including matching 401kcontributions, payment of over 95% of the total health insurance premiums, one-on-oneconsultations with a financial planner and continued development of employee skillsthrough the Vermont Training Program. The company has made cash donations to morethan 80 local organizations and, over the last six years, donated over 10% of its profitsback to the community. Environmental responsibility is another Wall/Goldfinger strength. For their work inredesigning a new finishing facility, the company received the Vermont Governor’s Awardfor Pollution Prevention in 2001. Later in 2006, the company invested in a recyclingsystem that reduces both pollution and the cost of heating fuel. The system pulls dust andwood shavings away from employees and stores the waste outdoors to be recycled into areturning stream of clean, heated air. As Vermont’s Small Business Person of the Year, John Wall will compete for the nationaltitle at National Small Business Week ceremonies in Washington, D.C., April 12-13. Mr.Wall will be locally honored by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) at aceremony presented by Vermont Business Magazine, June 7th at Burlington’s WaterfrontPark, 4:00-7:00 p.m. SBA also salutes winners of the 2006 Vermont Small Business Champion Awards,including National Winner Janet Bullard, Vermont Commission on Women: Janet BullardVermont Commission on Women, MontpelierState, New England Regional and National Women in Business ChampionJim KeyesCitizens Bank, BurlingtonFinancial Services Champion of the YearRobert JohnsonOmega Optical, Inc., BrattleboroSmall Business Exporter of the YearMark JohnsonWDEV Radio, WaterburySmall Business Journalist of the YearLaurie HammondTriple Loop Skate and Dance, ColchesterVermont Microenterprise AwardJohn B.Durfee and Lang DurfeeBethel Mills, BethelFamily-Owned Business of the YearMargaret FergusonMicro Business Development Program,Central VT Community Action Council, BarreHome-Based Business Champion of the YearSteve BrochuVermont Department of Labor, St. JohnsburyVeteran Small Business Champion of the Year# # #last_img read more

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Iowa co-op announces plans for state’s largest solar project

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Radio Iowa:Central Iowa Power Cooperative (CIPCO) has announced plans to develop what would be the largest solar project in Iowa. CIPCO is partnering with Clenera of Boise, Idaho to develop the project.Jared McKee is Clenera’s director of business development. “It will be 100 megawatts AC. So that’s actually the amount of power that will be delivered to the transmission system. And it’s estimated to be roughly 200 megawatt hours annually,” McKee explains. The solar facility will be built on 800 acres of land in Louisa County near Wapello.McKee says they are still working on the details and won’t start putting up panels for at least the end of the coming year. He says construction is slated for the end of 2019 and the start of 2020. McKee says they are looking at the best types of solar panels to use at the facility.McKee says more solar is being built in Iowa as the costs continue to drop. “Technology is getting better, the efficiency is getting greater. We’re moving with our suppliers to have better technology and better processes to really drive down rates,” McKee says. This is the second major solar project announced by CIPCO and goes along with the 60-megawatt project to repower the Summit Lake Generating Station in Creston. The project includes demolition of its 70-year old steam plant and installation of efficient natural gas-fired reciprocating engines by late 2022.CIPCO says the increased use of solar power will help offset the nuclear power being lost by the closing of the Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC) in Palo in 2020. CIPCO is 20 percent owner of the nuclear plant and receives 20 percent of its generating capacity from that plant.More: Solar power project proposed for Louisa County Iowa co-op announces plans for state’s largest solar projectlast_img read more

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Dissenters file their own reports

first_imgThe membership of the Supreme Court Committee on Privacy and Court Records includes: • Chair Jon Mills, dean emeritus of the University of Florida Levin School of Law • Kristin Adamson, Tallahassee lawyer • Andrew Z. Adkins, director of Legal Technology Institute, UF, Gainesville • 15th Circuit Judge Edward Fine, West Palm Beach • University of Miami College of Law Professor A. Michael Froomkin, Coral Gables • Clerk of Court Lydia Gardner, Orlando • Supreme Court Clerk Thomas D. Hall • Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal Judge Jacqueline Griffin • Jon Kaney, Jr., Ormond Beach, lawyer representing First Amendment Foundation • 11th Circuit Judge Judith L. Kreeger • Clerk of Court Barbara T. Scott, Punta Gorda • First Circuit Judge Kim A. Skievask i, Pensacola • Bay County Judge Elijah Smiley, Panama City • 12th Circuit Court Administrator Walt Smith, Sarasota • Larry Turner, a former Gainesville judge now in private practice ( Justice R. Fred Lewis served as liaison to the Supreme Court) September 1, 2005 Senior Editor Regular News Dissenters file their own reportscenter_img Dissenters file their own reports Some fear online access, clerks worry about their independence Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Fifth District Court of Appeal Judge Jacqueline Griffin was the leader of the naysayers, warning that public Internet access to court records is a “misguided goal” that will provide criminals and terrorists with a “Sears catalogue of personal histories to chose from.”And two court clerk members of the Supreme Court Committee on Privacy and Court Records — Charlotte County Clerk of Court Barbara T. Scott and Orange County Clerk of Court Lydia Gardner — agreed access to court records is the right of the public, whether over the Internet or at the courthouse, but they could not support the majority report because of what they consider clerks’ compromised independence and added liability in their role to keep confidential information out of the public record.In her eight-page minority report, Judge Griffin — joined by 11th Circuit Judge Judith Kreeger, 12th Circuit Court Administrator Walt Smith, and Tallahassee lawyer Kristin Adamson — pointed out that no one on the committee argued the courts have a duty to post court records online, only that the public access is more convenient.“If public access is good, the theory goes, then the maximum possible public access must be the maximum public good. Why should citizens be required to go to the courthouse to examine court records when technology will permit them to examine them from the comforts of their own living room? The answer, we believe, is that once the constitutional requirement that the records be open to public inspection is met, the courts must weigh the benefits of more convenient access. If this is done, it is clear that remote electronic access to images of court records should not be allowed.”Obvious problems, Griffin said, are personal and financial information in personal injury and criminal cases available for anyone to see at any time.“Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of the majority report is that it discounts the peril in which court users are placed when the courts turn over this private information to ready access by the public,” Griffin wrote. “Identity theft is the fastest growing and most pervasive crime in the United States, and court records offer the most detailed, most organized, and most wide-ranging reservoir of personal facts imaginable.. . . “Criminals or terrorists seeking cover will have a virtual Sears catalogue of personal histories to choose from. This risk burdens still further the citizen’s use of the courts. Given the precautions individuals are already taking or urged to take to protect themselves from identify theft, it is obvious that some who might need or wish to use the court will simply not take the risk.”In the clerks’ 16-page minority report, Scott and Gardner wrote: “Clerks are in agreement with the Privacy Committee’s finding that remote electronic access to court records brings efficiencies to the court not before encountered and access should be a goal. However, based on the current state of the law, the clerks cannot come to terms with the position set forth by the committee that the Supreme Court has exclusive authority over all aspects of court records.. . . “We believe clerks cannot overemphasize the necessity of maintaining independence in our administrative and ministerial functions in order to protect the integrity of the court system.. . . Nonetheless, the clerk has complete responsibility for maintaining the confidentiality of confidential reports. More properly, if the Privacy Committee is to suggest that the Florida Supreme Court assumes complete control over all aspects of judicial records in the custody of the clerk, the committee should similarly consider a recommendation to extend immunity to the clerk, rather than articulating a specific basis of liability for the clerk.”Here’s who served on the panel last_img read more

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SBA inks NAFCU alliance

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: David MorrisonThe leaders of the SBA and NAFCU met Wednesday to advance the agency’s goal of helping more credit unions make small business loans to their members.SBA Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet and NAFCU President/CEO Dan Berger met at the $95 million Washington Gas Light Federal Credit Union in Springfield, Va., to sign a Memorandum of Understanding that emphasized the two organizations’ willingness to work together. continue reading »last_img

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The Masters: Dustin Johnson confident as Phil Mickelson aims to be in contention | Golf News

first_img“Obviously I’ve been in this situation enough times on Sundays in majors where I can feed off those experiences and kind of know what to expect. It was a lot of fun. I’ve had a couple of good finishes here the last couple of years.“As long as the game stays in good form, I think I’m hopefully going to be around here on Sunday and have a chance to win.” Dustin Johnson during his practice round ahead of The Masters at Augusta National on Tuesday Dustin Johnson during his practice round ahead of The Masters at Augusta National on Tuesday
Dustin Johnson during his practice round ahead of The Masters at Augusta National on Tuesday

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FSN Ohio Will Televise Lauren Hill College Debut

first_imgLawrenceburg graduate Lauren Hill.CINCINNATI – The first women’s basketball game of the season for Mount St. Joseph University will air on Fox Sports Ohio.The game has been moved ahead of schedule to accommodate the wishes of Lawrenceburg High School graduate Lauren Hill, 19, who is suffering from a terminal brain cancer.Her dream is to play in a college basketball game. The touching story has gained national attention and led to Xavier University offering their 10,000 seat Cintas Center for the game. Tickets went on sale last week and sold out within a half hour.Mount St. Joe will face Hiram College at 2 p.m. Sunday.Fox Sports Ohio will broadcast the game live and ETC customers can locate the network on channel 22. It is also channel 427 on Dish Network and channel 661 for DirecTV viewers.Hill has launched the #layupforlauren challenge which raises money for brain cancer research.last_img read more

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