Cracking the egg

first_imgWhat does an engineer think about bird eggs? How about a computer scientist? Biologist Mary Caswell Stoddard wants to know.Stoddard, a junior fellow in Harvard’s Society of Fellows, is enlisting the expertise of those in other fields to expand her understanding of a structure that grows more remarkable the deeper she looks.Anyone who’s cracked one into a frying pan may wonder what secrets an egg could possibly hold, but Stoddard’s interest ranges widely, from composition to structure to appearance.“An egg is a remarkable package, unbreakable in some ways, until the right moment comes along,” Stoddard said. “Harvard has been an exceptionally dynamic place for me. I’ve been able to take advantage of the brain power here on Oxford Street.”James Weaver, a senior research scientist at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, has worked with Stoddard for the past two years examining the fine structural details of eggs: how their porosity and even pigmentation affect how they work.“We’re very interested in understanding how the architecture of eggs affects their mechanical properties,” he said.Researchers are interested not just in how structural details affect egg performance, Weaver said, but also in how these properties differ between birds with different nesting habits. A precise understanding of egg structure-function relationships could eventually yield applications for manmade materials, such as ceramics that break in predictable ways.Stoddard works out of the lab of Scott Edwards, a professor of organismic and evolutionary biology and curator of ornithology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology.“The most interesting thing to know about Cassie’s science is that it’s incredibly integrative in the true sense of the word,” Edwards said. “Although her interests are firmly in biology, she employs tools from engineering, chemistry, even genomics to get at the tough questions she is asking. She has broadened the study of avian diversity and behavior, specifically with her focus on eggs while at Harvard, to employ many diverse technical tools and software that have never before been used to ask questions in these areas. Her work is truly innovative because she is able to see connections between fields and tools that many biologists have not yet seen.”Stoddard has also collaborated with applied physicists at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and with computer scientists at Harvard and abroad. One project investigated how birds might perceive the color patterns of their own eggs.“It’s like face recognition for eggshells,” she said.Stoddard’s love of birds may be inherited. While growing up in Virginia, she was introduced to birding by her mother and grandmother, who share a passion for birds and wildlife. As an undergrad at Yale University, she was dazzled first by studies on bird color and plumage, and in particular by birds’ ability to see in ultraviolet wavelengths.Ultraviolet vision means that birds see one another differently than we do them. A white bird such as a gull, swan, or tern may not be entirely colorless when viewed by another bird, for example, a fact that offers opportunities for birds to communicate using colors invisible to humans.“There is a rich visual world beyond our imagination,” Stoddard said. “Birds might exploit certain channels for communication that would be invisible to predators, or they might evolve colors that are extraordinarily attractive or camouflaged. These ideas set the stage for my strong interest in coloration.”In grad work at the University of Cambridge, Stoddard explored nest parasitism, whereby certain birds — cuckoos in this case — lay their eggs in the nests of other birds, letting those other birds invest resources in raising the cuckoos’ young.To pull it off, cuckoo eggs must match the color and pattern of the host species, which have evolved highly individualistic egg patterns in an effort to foil the cuckoos’ strategy.“We found that birds targeted by cuckoos evolved egg patterns that were highly recognizable,” Stoddard said. “It’s a classic coevolutionary arms race.”Being a junior fellow at Harvard — a three-year appointment that ends in the fall — has nourished Stoddard’s interdisciplinary inclinations, she said. The fellowship includes regular dinners with the other 35 junior fellows and with Harvard faculty who are senior fellows. The meetings have introduced her to people working in a whole range of fields.“The very best part of the Society of Fellows is belonging to a community that is inherently interdisciplinary,” Stoddard said. “It’s opened my eyes to so many new kinds of scientific possibilities. … You really are given complete intellectual freedom. It allowed me to take risks in my research. That has meant the world to me.”Stoddard’s research recently received an additional boost from the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science program, which named her an International Rising Talent among female scientists. The award, the second she’s received through L’Oreal, recognized not just Stoddard’s science — it includes a grant for research — but also her mentoring of other women scientists.Mentoring is something Stoddard has been interested in since high school, when she turned her passion for the violin into skill she could share with middle-school musicians. As she matured into a scientist, she continued to work with younger students, in part out of recognition for those mentors who were important to her own career. At Harvard, she has met regularly for coffee or ice cream with two grad students, with the conversations touching on conference presentations, writer’s block, and any number of other topics.“It wasn’t long ago that I was a graduate student myself,” Stoddard said. “I feel it’s my responsibility to help others make those transitions.”Stoddard said that women have made a lot of progress toward equality in science-related fields, but gaps still exist.“I think that women are very important in scientific discovery, in all aspects of science. Staying engaged and active at all levels is very important.”last_img read more

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‘Frankenweek’ will take the measure of the monster

first_imgHe’s been a Hollywood favorite for decades.Inventor Thomas Edison helped bring him to life on film in 1910. Horror icon Boris Karloff gave the monster a jumble of reanimated body parts ready to wreak havoc, an indelible look and feel in 1931. Mel Brooks’ comic genius turned him into a debonair dandy in tails and top hat in 1974. Yet the range of screen interpretations only hints at how Mary Shelley envisioned her creation in her 1818 novel: as a creature struggling to comprehend his own existence who is desperate for companionship and acceptance.Frankenstein’s monster is 200, and in the coming days a series of Harvard events will shed some light on the lasting appeal of one of the greatest inventions in popular culture.In honor of the novel’s bicentennial, Harvard is sponsoring Frankenweek at Harvard, to include a public reading, a demonstration of some of the science experiments that sparked Shelley’s imagination, a Houghton Library display exploring the stage life of “Frankenstein,” and a symposium focused on film adaptations.One of the organizers of the celebration is Professor Deidre Lynch, a longtime “Frankenstein” fan who teaches “Modern Monsters in Literature and Film,” a course that works its way through 19th-century horror. Her students, Lynch said, are “really into it.” They have also been shocked to learn of the genre’s deep roots.“I think that they are just so surprised to find out that this tradition exists — in some ways that horror isn’t just a thing of the slasher films,” said Lynch, Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature. “They are interested in how much the literature depicts monsters as things that are created by humans. Monsters are made rather than monsters being born.”For Lynch, who on Friday will take part in the panel discussion “The Afterlives of Frankenstein: Extinction, Emergence, and the Haunted Screen,” the book was the perfect match for the screen.“Shelley’s novel in some ways is almost a recipe for film,” she said. “You have dead matter animated by the power of electricity, and filmmakers seem to recognize that it is almost allegorizing their own way of working.” “Shelley’s novel in some ways is almost a recipe for film. You have dead matter animated by the power of electricity, and filmmakers seem to recognize that it is almost allegorizing their own way of working.” — Deidre Lynch Shelley’s story can be traced to a geological disaster. In 1815, the massive eruption of Mount Tambora in the Dutch East Indies spewed ash and gas into the stratosphere, triggering low temperatures and fog and rain in much of the world for the next three years.Shelley and her husband, the English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, vacationed in Switzerland in the dark summer of 1816. While there, the couple befriended the poet Lord Byron and his traveling companion, a young physician named William Polidori. Often stuck inside due to the weather, the group turned to a volume of German ghost stories for entertainment. Soon, Byron suggested they write their own scary tales. Inspired by conversations between her husband and Byron about the “nature and principle of life,” and a waking dream in which she saw “the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together,” Shelley began work on her masterpiece. (Polidori would later pen “The Vampyre,” considered the first modern vampire story.)Published two years later, Shelley’s “Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus” was a hit, before long inspiring a London stage version. “It just becomes part of the 19th-century popular culture,” said Lynch.The professor thinks the 19th century’s extreme class divisions may have influenced how the work was received.“There certainly are ways in which in the 19th-century ‘Frankenstein’ is often read as a story about the revenge of the poor,” said Lynch. “We think of it as a story about science out of control and technology out of control, but I think for a 19th-century audience, they are very conscious that the bodies that are used by doctors in training, the bodies that are used by anatomists, are the bodies of the poor. And so this vengeful creature who’s composed of multiple body parts from multiple corpses seems in the 19th century like a figure for the unruly ungovernable energies of the mob, who have every reason to be angry with the governing class.”Shelley’s story endures, like other horror classics, because it continues to help people cope with their fears and everyday anxieties, Lynch said.“At the present moment in society there’s a kind of violence that is just so pervasive that we don’t know how to deal with it, whereas films, horror novels, give us some sort of narrative closure. And that might be consoling in some way.”last_img read more

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Telling the untold stories

first_img Harvard’s Dreamers have their say Ask the undocumented Related 4 Harvard College students recount their journeys and their hopes A plea to support DACA In testimony before Congress, Harvard graduate, chosen for a Rhodes, worries about being able to return to U.S. afterward center_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. When Mayra Sandoval was in Mexico on a Fulbright Scholarship in 2016, she volunteered with an organization helping U.S. deportees and returnees navigate their lives after arriving in Mexico. Hearing some of their tales — both struggles and successes — Sandoval had a clear thought: These are untold stories.In the U.S., she said, “I never really heard about what it was like when you are deported [or choose to return]. People just got forgotten.”Now a master’s candidate in her final semester at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Sandoval and her classmate Ariana Aparicio Aguilar want others to hear some of those untold stories, too. So they organized an event, “Return Migration: The Untold Stories,” that they hope will give attendees a sense of the hardships deportees and those who return voluntarily can encounter, along with the achievements they can attain.The event, slated for 5 p.m. Thursday at Askwith Hall, is part of a series looking at immigration organized by the UndocuAllies Initiative, a HGSE student group that focuses on issues facing undocumented immigrants and those with Temporary Protected Status. Aguilar and Sandoval are the group’s co-presidents.Return migration is one of the most pressing fears of the nation’s undocumented and temporarily protected immigrant populations, the pair said. And with political turmoil around immigration brewing in recent years, many of these immigrants have been forced to imagine the reality of that possibility.‘These are our friends, these are our family members’For both Aguilar and Sandoval, the issue is personal. Sandoval is part of a mixed-status family, while Aguilar is among the more than 700,000 young adults who receive protection under DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.“These are stories that we don’t really talk about here in the United States,” said Sandoval. “I know people who have gotten deported. These are our friends, these are our family members, someone’s dad or mom. A lot of the conversation is on DACA and students here. How can we help people here with immigration? But what about those people who don’t make it? What are those stories? Because they are still our family members, even though they are in different country.”,In fiscal year 2018, the U.S. deported more than 256,000 undocumented immigrants and the number is said to be rising, though it is still below that of the height of the Obama era. The number of undocumented immigrants who voluntarily returned to their home countries is largely unknown, though the Pew Research Center estimated that from 2009 to 2014 more Mexican immigrants returned to Mexico than arrived in the U.S. Family reunification was the top reason for voluntary returns.For the event, Sandoval and Aguilar, along with other members of the UndocuAllies leadership team, organized a three-member panel to delve into what happens when undocumented immigrants who have lived in the U.S. for an extended period return to a country they may no longer recognize as home.The panel — people who have researched the topic, worked in the field, or been personally affected — said that the experiences of returning from extended stays in the U.S. vary widely, with some finding fulfilling career and educational opportunities and others struggling to overcome significant cultural differences and even discrimination. They reflected that the experience for both the returnees and the families they left behind is difficult, but it does get easier.“After a while it can become so much more,” said Daniel Arenas, the co-founder of Dream in Mexico, which helps connect 17- to 35-year-old deportees and returnees who have lived in the U.S. for at least five years with educational and employment opportunities in Mexico. To date, the organization has helped more than 3,000 young adults go over their options in Mexico and get paperwork such as Mexican ID cards and passport applications in order, and even met them at the airport on their arrival.Culture shockArenas, who is the event’s keynote speaker, returned to Mexico in 2007 when he was 18 after living in the U.S. for 14 years. He has seen a number of deportees and others who have returned to Mexico start careers, earn degrees, and have strong economic stability either in Mexico or in other countries like Canada and Nicaragua.But about a half-million young Mexican adults fit Arenas’ demographic, and he has also seen people struggle with cultural expectations or the economic realities of the area they are in.Arenas said one man supported by Dream in Mexico felt disrespected after not being paid regularly for the work he did on his grandfather’s farm, where he also lived. The man didn’t understand that for many Mexican farmers, it’s normal not to pay workers until an animal is sold or crops are harvested. A young woman the organization worked with returned to live with her grandmother in a rural town. She became uncomfortable after her grandmother wanted her to adopt a more traditional female role in their culture and learn to cook and clean for the family. She eventually moved to a more contemporary-thinking city and worked in a call center, places where many English speakers find employment, Arenas said. “They could tell that I didn’t grow up there. My accent was different. My mannerisms were different. … I think that was the hardest part, realizing that I was not Mexican enough and not American because I lack this piece of paper.” — Ariana Aparicio Aguilar In Arenas’ experience, major urban centers like Mexico City, Monterrey, and Guadalajara are where jobs are easiest to find. “That’s where the industries are, that’s where the universities are, that’s where the companies are that will be able to hire them and allow them to speak English and use the fact that they’re bicultural,” he said.But being bicultural isn’t always to their advantage. There is often stigma placed on those seen as too Americanized, opening returnees to bullying, discrimination, and alienation.“At first [people] recognize you as the fact that you returned or were deported,” Arenas said. “They saw me and saw: ‘Oh, that’s the guy that doesn’t speak Spanish well, that’s the guy that doesn’t know about Mexican culture, that’s the guy that dresses a certain way or listens to a certain type of music.’”Aguilar had a similar experience on a 2016 trip to Mexico to visit her sick grandfather. It was her first time back in 16 years and she had to get special permission to go because of her DACA status.“They could tell that I didn’t grow up there,” she said. “My accent was different. My mannerisms were different. The way that I dressed was different. I stood out even without opening my mouth. I think that was the hardest part, realizing that I was not Mexican enough and not American because I lack this piece of paper.”Rebuilding a support systemIt does gets better, Arenas said, as it did for him after people in his new community learned more about him and he built a strong support system of people who helped him adjust, fit in, and reach his goals. Finding a network is now one of the first things Dream in Mexico encourages deportees and other returnees to do.“What we’ve seen is that the people who are able to have success, if you want to call it that, are the people who have a support system that’s willing to help them,” he said. “What we mean by support system is a group of people or an institution or organization that’s willing to help you in a genuine way.”The support system can include family still in the U.S.Kenia Alfaro ’17, M.Ed., who will be on the event’s panel, remembers when her father was deported to El Salvador in 2012 after having lived in the U.S. for 20 years. Alfaro, who helped establish UndocuAllies, said she and her family who stayed in the U.S. became a large part of her father’s support system, keeping in contact and telling him about their lives while hearing about his. She said they’ve had to make a big effort to learn more about each other so they can have deeper conversations.“We talk and share pictures,” Alfaro said, “and update each other when we can.” It isn’t easy, but, “We do the best we can.”As for her father’s new life in El Rosario, the municipality where he lives in El Salvador, Alfaro said he’s adjusted somewhat. He had to reintegrate himself with the community and his family there and find a new sense of purpose and ways to pass the time, so he took up hobbies such as fishing, and found a way to integrate his experience in construction, which was the work he did in the U.S.“He loves building things,” Alfaro said, “so he makes furniture for people and, every once in a while, he does remodeling on a space that needs it.” But in a country with a lot of economic disparity, she said, “He’s very open in talking about how difficult everything still is.”Difficult choicesThe challenges went both ways. Alfaro and her family in the U.S. had to adjust to life without him and deal with the lack of income caused by his deportation. Alfaro also regretted not having her father there to witness milestones in her life, like graduations or launching her career at the Welcome Project, where she is now a development coordinator.Those are fears Sandoval has always known.“The risk of deportation and of being separated has always been something my family has thought of ever since I was really little,” she said. “I think that’s the scariest part — being separated.”,The fear reflects the experiences HGSE Professor Roberto Gonzales, the third panel member, has encountered in more than 17 years studying undocumented young people and mixed-status families in the U.S.“Deportations, in particular, extend their reach into family life, impacting the structure, organization, and experiences of individuals and their families,” Gonzales said. “I’ve met spouses and children of deportees who were left to pick up the pieces after their loved one’s deportation and who were pressed to make very difficult decisions about either staying in the United States or joining their loved ones abroad.”Arenas said following family members who have been deported is among the many reasons people choose to return voluntarily to their home countries. One he’s come across more often, however, is undocumented people trying to achieve a goal they’ve been blocked from reaching in the U.S. Reasons vary from being unable to renew DACA because of a criminal record to being afraid of not finding work without documentation to exhaustion from living in constant fear because of their status. Arenas, for example, chose to return to Mexico to earn a university degree, knowing it would be difficult for him to do so in the U.S. without the proper papers.For reasons like that, he believes that migration — even return migration — “can be beautiful.”“For a long time, a lot of us were seeing returning to Mexico or being deported as going to a black hole,” he said. “At first when you come back, that’s the only thing you think about. Then, instead of just thinking, ‘I’m not living in the U.S.,’ you’re thinking about, ‘Wow, I was able to get into a university in Mexico’; ‘Wow, I’ve been able to travel to several parts of Mexico’; ‘Wow, I’ve been able to learn about my culture and other family members.’ … So it becomes deeper than that.”Aguilar believes hearing other returnees’ stories may help current undocumented or temporary immigrants see things in a more positive light, too. “My hope is that [this event and others sponsored by UndocuAllies] can provide a better understanding around the complexities of immigration in the U.S. and the intersectionality and nuances of undocumented people as they live in the shadows of American society,” she said. “My hope is that attendees can leave more knowledgeable and empowered to implement positive changes that will bring these communities out of the shadows.”“Undocumented & Black: Race & Justice in America” on April 1 looked at the experience of black undocumented immigrants. Professor Cornell West was the keynote speaker. “Jin Park at HGSE: The Bittersweetness of Selectivity & Belonging” on April 8 looks at the experience of Jin Park ’18, the first DACA recipient to receive a Rhodes Scholarship. Other events in UndocuAllies’ “Immigration Series: Narratives of Self-reliance & Solidarity” examines immigration through particular lenses. The series is in collaboration with the Office of Student Affairs at HGSE, the Black Student Union, and the Pan Asian Coalition for Education. Undocumented students explain nuances of their situation, fears for loved ones last_img read more

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Chinese civil rights advocate interprets contemporary injustice in home country

first_imgCourtesy of the Institute for Church Life Prominent civil rights advocate Chen Guangcheng discusses the current state of human rights in China. Chen reflected on his work as a lawyer and his persecution by the Chinese government.“As long as you remain true to your cause as an activist, the communist party will continue to persecute you,” Chen said through his translator. “There is really no moral limit.”Chen said although many Americans now visit China, they typically only stay in the modernized cities and avoid rural areas. This limited perspective, Chen said, can contribute to misconceptions about how the Chinese people actually live. He said that over 70 percent of the population lives in rural areas.“If you look at some of the official published statistics, you will get the impression that many of the farmers or poor peasants enjoy a relatively good life, but what I can tell you is that those data are not true,” Chen said.After conducting his own studies, Chen said the actual standard of living for the vast majority of the agrarian Chinese population is much lower than the figures the government issues publicly. Further compounding this poverty, Chen said, is the fact that local peasants receive virtually no monetary support from the government.“Right now it is undeniable that China’s new exercises are autocratic,” Chen said. “It is truly a one-party state.”Chen said he began his career as an activist by representing the disabled in rural areas who are entitled to benefits by Chinese law, but instead receive nothing and are even taxed. Their plight is compounded by a dearth of access to legal counsel caused by their lack of money and the general reluctance of lawyers to pursue cases that could be considered anti-government, Chen said.However, Chen said the issue of coercive family planning practice also drew his attention and deserved more scrutiny. According to Chen, government agents use physical violence to enforce reproductive policy and the one-child rule in particular.“Oftentimes, the way they do it is to not only punish the woman who is pregnant with her second child, but also to go beyond herself such as her immediate family, relatives, siblings, uncles and aunts,” Chen said.The abuses of the government in this regard include threats of violence, torture, and physically forcing women to undergo abortions, Chen said, as well as forging consent forms to use as legal cover. According to Chen’s estimates, there have been over 30,000 cases of forced abortions and overall 360 million Chinese women have gotten abortions. Chen said this has resulted in massive social problems in China, including a substantial gender gap in the population and unusually small families being unable to support older relatives.Chen said seeing these injustices made him dedicate his life to activism, and he has suffered repercussions, ranging from torture and physical abuse to financial bribery, because of it. However, he said he will persevere in this cause and continue to to help his fellow countrymen.“On the other side, for foreigners or people who have an interest in China, I hope you all will hold more of a long-term view and do not compromise, do not give in to the communist party,” Chen said. “I think the future is bright.”Editor’s Note: The original version of this article referred to Chen Guangcheng by his given name, Guangcheng, instead of his family name, Chen. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: activism, activist, Chen Guangcheng, China, Human Dignity Lecture, Law Prominent Chinese civil rights advocate and political dissident Chen Guangcheng delivered the University of Notre Dame 2015 Human Dignity Lecture, entitled “Interpreting Reform: Human Dignity and Human Rights in Contemporary China,” Tuesday evening in McKenna Hall. With the aid of a translator, the “barefoot lawyer” discussed his personal experiences as a legal counsel for poor rural Chinese citizens, the persecution he faced from the government and the state of civil rights in modern China.last_img read more

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4 things high-performance companies do better than you

first_imgWhat is it about high-performance companies that helps them operate at such a high level? Here are four things that set high-performance companies apart from their competitors…They’re mission focused: In general, credit unions seem to care a lot more about their members than those other financial institutions. Members love knowing that their credit union is there when they need them. That’s what sets credit unions apart. But what sets your credit union apart from other credit unions? Keep your team focused on your members and you’ll continue to have them.They provide for their staff: Whether it’s training, software or even facilities, high-performance companies provide their staff with the tools they need to succeed. Your staff can only do so much, so any thing you can provide that will give them an edge on the competition is a plus.They adapt to change: Sometimes change can feel like a punch in the mouth. Instead of fearing it, it’s time to embrace it. In this age of technology, change is everywhere. Use it as an opportunity to evolve and separate yourself from anyone who’s just getting by.They pay for talent: When hiring new employees, there’s only one way to get the best of the best. Give them a purpose. Show them the benefits of working for your credit union. And pay them. Make sure they know that they are the best and that you only want the best. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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UK marine industry commends tidal and wave energy report

first_imgCompanies and organizations active in the UK’s marine energy sector have welcomed ORE Catapult’s report which analyzed cost reduction and industrial benefits of tidal stream and wave energy in the UK.The report pointed out that tidal stream in the UK has the potential to significantly reduce costs from approximately £300 per MWh today to below £90 per MWh within 1GW deployment.The evidence-based assessment has also shown that tidal and wave energy could provide significant economic benefits in terms of exports and job creation in the next 20 years.Furthermore, ORE Catapult’s study stated that tidal stream requires an immediate route to market via revenue support to enable volume deployment, standardization and the application of existing innovation activity.Welcoming the report, the Chief Executive of tidal developer Scotrenewables Tidal Power – Andrew Scott – said: “The ORE Catapult study presents a hugely compelling case to implement structured commercial markets for tidal energy that will enable the investment required to build the tidal energy industry in the UK.“This is an industry with an existing supply chain which can grow substantially more if the right market framework is put in place. There is a massive opportunity to build the tidal sector in the UK and a global export industry, based around skills and technology. And let’s not forget that this industrial opportunity can be realized whilst capturing the environmental, economic and security benefits which come from a predictable renewable energy source.”Kepler Energy, which plans to deploy a 600MW tidal fence in the Bristol Channel, also welcomed the report but pointed out that ORE Catapult could have substantially under-estimated the total potential of tidal energy in UK waters.Kepler Energy tidal fence concept (Image: Kepler Energy)Peter Dixon, Kepler Energy’s Executive Chairman, said: “Kepler Energy welcomes and supports the ORE Catapult report and its conclusions. The good news is that the ORE Catapult may substantially under-estimate the total potential of tidal energy in UK waters, since it appears not to include the lower velocity/shallower tidal waters where other tidal technologies, such as our tidal fence, can be deployed.“Our tidal energy technology, akin to a water mill and which will use the very latest carbon composite technology, has a lower cost of energy that many other marine energy technologies. In addition, construction of our first tidal fence in the Bristol Channel will require several thousand tonnes per year of carbon fibre for a number of years which will catalyse the UK composites industry, supporting BEIS’s Industrial and Clean Growth Strategies.”Right government support conditional to fulfill ‘enormous’ tidal and wave potentialReacting to the report, Hannah Smith, Senior Policy Manager at Scottish Renewables – a member organization acting as the voice for Scottish renewable energy sector – said:“This landmark report clearly demonstrates the enormous potential of our wave and tidal energy industries – should they be able to access the right support from Government.“Marine renewable energy is not only a valuable source of clean electricity, helping us meet our carbon targets, but can bring diverse benefits to our wider economy too. This report shows that with even modest global deployment the sector could rapidly reduce its costs, drive economic growth in rural communities and export around the world.“We now need government and industry to work together to enable projects to come forward, capture learning from projects and deliver the benefits of wave and tidal technologies.”Sian Wilson, Senior Energy & Infrastructure Manager at Crown Estate Scotland, the public body that manages leasing of seabed to support offshore renewables, said:“With MeyGen Phase 1a now fully operational, the Scotrenewables turbine continuing to produce electricity and Nova Innovation going from strength-to-strength, the industry has achieved what was asked – the continuous production of MWh – proving the generation potential, reliability and predictability.“This new study shows that tidal has proven technology and can benefit consumers, communities and the climate, with real potential for new jobs and economic growth.”The study will now be passed to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, as well as the Scottish and Welsh Governments, where it is hoped it will pave the way for greater government support, including much needed revenue support in the future.last_img read more

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Covid-19 impacts Seabed Geosolutions’ activities

first_imgIn response, Seabed will implement rigorous cost and capex reduction measures. It may also result in an earlier than anticipated buy back of Manta nodes, pre-financed by the partner for the duration of the project. In the first quarter, a project was completed in the Gulf of Mexico, and another project is expected to be completed early May. Although the company is actively pursuing opportunities, backlog is currently limited. Therefore, Seabed is reducing its operational footprint. The Middle East project, which was planned to last until March 2021 has, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, been affected by a deteriorated operating environment and increasing operational complexities brought about by the pandemic. As a result, the client and Seabed’s local partner have decided to terminate the contract with immediate effect. This will trigger one off project related charges currently estimated at around EUR 20-30 million, to be recognised in the first quarter of 2020 with a related cash impact of around 50% of this range. Seabed believes that the contract termination was not in line with the contractual terms and Seabed will seek indemnification and/or compensation in order to protect its interest. A significant ongoing project in the Middle East has been cancelled and another project that was scheduled to start imminently in Brazil has been postponed. center_img Seabed Geosolutions is feeling the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on its activity. In addition, depending on market and backlog developments, an additional non-cash impairment might have to be recognised in the second quarter in relation to the valuation of Seabed Geosolutions.   A deep water project in Brazil, which was due to start shortly, was postponed by the client in relation to the COVID-19 situation. The commercial terms of the postponement have been mutually agreed.  SG&A expenses will be reduced by around 40%. The company will also apply for available governmental schemes in the countries in which it operates. In addition, capex is to be strongly reduced.last_img read more

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Winebarger first in Fast Friday feature

first_imgBy Ben DeatherageCOTTAGE GROVE, Ore. (Aug. 26) – Friday saw a full house at Cottage Grove Speedway as the ¼-mile clay oval hosted the final Fast Friday of 2016 and all fans through the front gate got in for free.Eric Ashley was quick out of the box in the Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified main event.Ashley paced the field until around lap 16 when he was passed for the lead. The driver to make it around him was Collen Winebarger.Winebarger led the rest of the way to score his fifth win of 2016 at CGS. Ashley was a second followed by John Campos in third. Craig Hanson was fourth while finishing fifth was Jeff Lovell.last_img

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Cricket News Vizag wicket was tough even for a world-class player like MS Dhoni: Glenn Maxwell

first_imgIndia lost the Vizag T20I against Australia by three wickets.Australia won a T20I against India in India for only the second time.MS Dhoni had a strike-rate of just 78 in his knock of 29. highlights New Delhi: The Vizag Twenty20 International resulted in a low-scoring thriller with India managing to score just 126/7 thanks to KL Rahul’s fifty. In response, Jasprit Bumrah’s 3/16 kept Virat Kohli’s side in the contest but Glenn Maxwell’s brilliant 56 and some calm batting from Jhye Richardson and Pat Cummins helped Australia secure a tense three-wicket win off the last ball. The loss was not an ideal start for India as they aim to build momentum for the World Cup. Two people were criticised immensely for the loss in Vizag. Umesh Yadav was targeted for not defending 14 runs in the final over while MS Dhoni was criticised for his extremely slow batting in the first innings when he hit 29 off 37 balls at a strike-rate of 78. However, Maxwell has a different take on Dhoni’s batting.“It (the slow strike rate) was probably fair enough. With the way the wicket was behaving, it was difficult to score for any batter, let alone a guy who is not known for his power-hitting in Chahal. MS is obviously a world-class finisher and even he was finding it hard to hit the middle of the bat. So, I think it was right of him to try and farm the strike. He hit a six in the last over and I think that showed how difficult it was. If you are holding MS to one boundary in the last few overs, it’s a pretty good effort and also a sign of the conditions as well,” Maxwell commented. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Dhoni came to bat when Rishabh Pant was run-out for 3. India lost two wickets in the 13th over with Nathan Coulter-Nile getting rid of the well-set KL Rahul for 50 and Dinesh Karthik for 1. Dhoni struggled to get going and momentum was with Australia. The former Indian skipper shielded Yuzvendra Chahal at the other end and managed to hit a six off Coulter-Nile over extra cover. That was the only six in the last 10 overs as India managed just 46 runs.In response, Australia were boosted by a solid partnership between D’Arcy Short and Maxwell, with the right-hander tackling the spinners well and hitting a glorious fifty. But, Maxwell admitted that Bumrah and Krunal Pandya were the most difficult to face on this sluggish wicket. “Bumrah and Krunal Pandya were the toughest guys to face on that wicket because they are capable of extracting a low sort of bounce and didn’t give you much width to work,” Maxwell said.India will take on Australia in the final Twenty20 International in Bengaluru on February 27.last_img read more

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Man Utd, Arsenal Shoulder English Hopes as Group Stage Begins

first_imgEUROPA LEAGUEManchester United and last year’s finalists Arsenal headline an English trio that also features Europa League newcomers Wolves while record five-time champions Sevilla figure to be among the primary contenders as the group stage begins tonight.Scottish rivals Celtic and Rangers face testing paths to the knockout rounds as bitter foes Roma and Lazio bid to end Italy’s two-decade wait for the title. Porto, PSV Eindhoven and Feyenoord are the other former European Cup winners in a competition that will welcome the eight third-place finishers from the Champions League groups for the knockout phase.United, Europa League winners in 2017, will host Astana in Group L as Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side face opponents from Kazakhstan for the first time in club history.They will expected to progress with relative ease from a group that also includes Partizan Belgrade and former finalists AZ Alkmaar of the Netherlands.Unai Emery’s Arsenal return to the competition after last season’s 4-1 defeat by Chelsea in the final in Baku saw the Blues pip them to Champions League qualification.The Gunners visit Eintracht Frankfurt to kick off their campaign, with 10-time Belgian champions Standard Liege and Portugal’s Vitoria Guimaraes also in Group F.Wolves, in their first European campaign since 1980, will meet Portuguese club Braga in their opening game at Molineux.Nuno Espirito Santo’s team came through three ties just to reach the group stage. They beat Torino 5-3 on aggregate in the play-offs.“I think any team in the Europa League are a good team who we will respect going up against them. We will give everything, try to play and try to beat any team,” said Wolves winger Adama Traore.“Any player wants to play in Europe, but the Europa League is exciting, it is a new thing for us and it’s a good thing.”Scottish champions Celtic travel to French Cup holders Rennes in Group E, with Italian Cup holders Lazio and CFR Cluj, the Romanian side to whom they lost in Champions League qualifying, completing a tricky section.Steven Gerrard’s Rangers are at home to Jaap Stam’s Feyenoord on Thursday and will do well to navigate a group with Porto and Swiss champions Young Boys.Roma will take on Istanbul Basaksehir in their first game while Moenchengladbach host Austria’s Wolfsberg – not to be confused with German outfit Wolfsburg.Austria boast two representatives with LASK Linz among the six debutants – alongside Espanyol, Wolves, Wolfsberg, Olexandriya and Ferencvaros – in the tournament.UEFA will distribute 560 million euros to clubs competing in this season’s Europa League, just over a quarter of the 1.95 billion euros allocated to those participating in the Champions League.Each of the 48 clubs in the group stage will receive a base of 2.92 million euros, with lifting the trophy worth just under 18 million euros in basic prize money.Teams will net 570 000 euros per win and 190 000 for a draw with additional revenue coming through television markets and money depending on each team’s UEFA ranking.By comparison, the Champions League winners stand to take home around 75 million euros before considerable sums are tacked based on the market pool and coefficient ranking.The final will be held in the Polish city of Gdansk on May 27, 2020.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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